Provided by: nvram-wakeup_0.97-10_i386 bug

NAME

       nvram-wakeup  -  a  (small)  program that can read and write the WakeUp
       time in the BIOS.

SYNOPSIS

       nvram-wakeup [-l|--syslog] [-D|--debug] [-A|--directisa] [-N|--nowrite]
       [-d|--disable]    [-s|--settime    time]   [-C|--configfile   filename]
       [-I|--iwname string] [-v|--version] [-h|--help]

DESCRIPTION

       nvram-wakeup is a (small) program that can read and  write  the  WakeUp
       time  in  the  BIOS (via /dev/nvram on kernels >= 2.4.6 or using direct
       I/O).   On  this  WakeUp  time  the  computer  will   be   powered   on
       automatically from the soft-off state.

OPTIONS

       If  run  without  options,  nvram-wakeup  will  read the current wakeup
       settings from the NVRAM and print them on stdout.

       -l, --syslog
              This option will let nvram-wakeup log all output via syslogd  to
              the  system  log  instead  of stdout/stderr.  This option should
              always be the first one.

       -D, --debug
              This option enables printing debug messages.

       -A, --directisa
              Use direct I/O port  access  to  access  the  nvram  instead  of
              /dev/nvram.   This  option  must  be  used  if the configuration
              option upper_method is set. The device /dev/rtc is still used.

              WARNING: If you  use  the  option  --directisa  and  some  other
              programm  tries to access nvram and/or rtc at the same time, you
              might screw up all your nvram (i.e. all CMOS settings).

       -N, --nowrite
              This option disables writing into the nvram and rtc devices. But
              all the values for the bytes are calculated. Write them down and
              go set the same date/time via BIOS Setup, run  nvram-wakeup  and
              see  if  the values  you written down  correspond to  the values
              set by the BIOS.

       -s time, --settime=time
              Specify the time on which the computer should be up and running.
              The time is specified as a time_t value, i.e., number of seconds
              since epoch (Jan 1 1970, 00:00:00).

              See EXAMPLES below on how to set a "human readable" wakeup time.

              Set time to 0 to disable the wakeup feature.

              You  can  specify  multiple  -s|--settime options on the command
              line, as far as they all have the same time value. See  EXAMPLES
              below.

       -d, --disable
              A synonym for --settime=0

       -C filename, --configfile=filename
              Read mainboard configuration from configuration file filename.

              See  nvram-wakeup.conf(5)  for  information on the syntax of the
              file.

              See BOARD CONFIGURATION below for general information on getting
              board configurations.

       -I name, --iwname=name
              If the DMI entries of your mainboard are broken, you may specify
              a DMI infowriter name  here.  (it’s  the  name  of  one  of  the
              functions from nvram-wakeup-mb.c)

              If you specify --configfile as well as the --iwname option, then
              --iwname is ignored.

              See BOARD CONFIGURATION below for general information on getting
              board configurations.

       -w minutes, --wakeupbefore=minutes
              Specify  how  many  minutes before the programmed wakeuptime the
              computer should wake up.

              The default is to start 5 minutes before the  programmed  wakeup
              time.

       -h, --help
              Print a help message and exit.

       -v, --version
              Display version and author information.

BOARD CONFIGURATION

       By  default,  the  mainboard is autodetected by reading DMI information
       from the BIOS.  If the DMI entries are broken, you can specify the name
       of  the infowriter to be used with the --iwname option. This only works
       if the board configuration is aleready compiled into the program.   The
       list of existing infowriters can be found in the source.

       Example:  On  my  Biostar  M6VCG the whole DMI entry is broken (maybe a
       BIOS update would help, but I never tried it), but the configuration of
       the  board  is known, so only the autodetection doesn’t work. Thus look
       up (in nvram-wakeup-mb.c) the name of the infowriter to  beused,  which
       is ’bio_m6vcg’ and call

              nvram-wakeup --iwname bio_m6vcg

       If nvram-wakeup doesn’t know anything about your board, you can put the
       board configuration into  a  file  and  pass  the  file  name  via  the
       --configfile  option  to  nvram-wakeup.   Look nvram-wakeup.conf(5) for
       more information on the configuration file syntax.

       If you specify --configfile  as  well  as  the  --iwname  option,  then
       --iwname is ignored.

EXAMPLES

       You  can  specify  multiple  -d or -s options at the command line,  but
       they must specify the same time, e.g.

              nvram-wakeup --settime=0 -s0 -s 0 -d -ddds0  # is O.K.
              nvram-wakeup -s1002722247 -s1002722247       # is O.K.
              nvram-wakeup -s1002722247 -s1002722248       # is not O.K.
              nvram-wakeup -s1002722247 --disable          # is not O.K.

       If you want the machine to be up and running in 20 minutes, call

              nvram-wakeup -s $((‘date +%s‘ + 20 * 60))

       If you want the machine to be up and running at 18:30 today, call

              nvram-wakeup -s ‘date +%s -d "18:30"‘

       Note that this is really "today" so if you run this  after  18:30,  the
       time will be in the past.

       If  you want the machine to be up and running on a particular day, at a
       particular time, say at 18:30 on Apr. 23rd, call

              nvram-wakeup -s ‘date +%s -d "Apr 23 18:30"‘

       For "tomorrow" you can use something like that:

              nvram-wakeup -s $((‘date +%s -d "18:30"‘ + 60*60*24))

EXIT STATUS

       0      Successful program execution. The new date  and  time  were  set
              successfully.

       1      Successful  program execution. The computer must be rebooted for
              the changes to take effect.

       2      An error occured. Something went wrong.

FILES

       /dev/nvram
              NVRAM character device. This one is used for reading/writing the
              nvram values if the command line option --directisa is not used.

       /dev/rtc
              RTC character device. This one is used to determine if  the  RTC
              clock   is  running  localtime  or  UTC/GMT.  Furthermore,  some
              motherboards use the RTC alarm time for the wakeup feature.

       /dev/mem
              Memory character device. This one is used to get DMI information
              for board autodetection.

       nvram-wakeup.conf
              Configuration file for a mainboard not supported out-of-the-box.
              See nvram-wakeup.conf(5) for information on the  syntax  of  the
              file.

SEE ALSO

       nvram-wakeup.conf(5)

HOMEPAGE

       http://sf.net/projects/nvram-wakeup/

AUTHOR

       Written by Sergei Haller <Sergei.Haller@math.uni-giessen.de>.

REPORTING BUGS

       Report bugs at the bug tracking system (see HOMEPAGE) or on the mailing
       list nvram-wakeup-devel@lists.sourceforge.net

COPYRIGHT

       Copyright © 2001-2004 Sergei Haller.

       This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it
       under  the  terms of the GNU General Public License as published by the
       Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of the License, or (at  your
       option) any later version.

       This  program  is  distributed  in the hope that it will be useful, but
       WITHOUT  ANY  WARRANTY;  without   even   the   implied   warranty   of
       MERCHANTABILITY  or  FITNESS  FOR  A  PARTICULAR  PURPOSE.  See the GNU
       General Public License for more details.

       You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License along
       with this program; if not, write to the Free Software Foundation, Inc.,
       59 Temple Place, Suite 330, Boston, MA  02111-1307  USA