Provided by: gmt-common_5.4.5+dfsg-1_all bug

NAME

       psbasemap - Plot PostScript base maps

SYNOPSIS

       psbasemap  -Jparameters
        -Rwest/east/south/north[/zmin/zmax][+r]  [  -B[p|s]parameters ] [  -A[file] ] [  -Dinsert
       box ] [  -Fbox ] [  -K ] [  -Jz|Zparameters ] [  -Lscalebar ] [  -O ] [  -P ] [  -U[stamp]
       ] [  -Trose ] [  -Tmag_rose ] [  -V[level] ] [  -Xx_offset ] [  -Yy_offset ] [ -fflags ] [
       -pflags ] [ -ttransp ]

       Note: No space is allowed between the option flag and the associated arguments.

DESCRIPTION

       psbasemap creates PostScript code that will produce a basemap.   Several  map  projections
       are  available,  and  the  user  may  specify  separate  tick-mark  intervals for boundary
       annotation, ticking, and [optionally] gridlines. A simple map scale  or  directional  rose
       may also be plotted.  At least one of the options -B, -L, or -T must be specified.

REQUIRED ARGUMENTS

       -Jparameters (more ...)
              Select map projection.

       -Rxmin/xmax/ymin/ymax[+r][+uunit] (more ...)
              Specify the region of interest.

       For perspective view p, optionally append /zmin/zmax. (more ...)

OPTIONAL ARGUMENTS

       -A[file]
              No  plotting  is  performed.  Instead, we determine the geographical coordinates of
              the polygon outline for the (possibly oblique) rectangular map  domain.   The  plot
              domain  must  be  given  via -R and -J, with no other options allowed. The sampling
              interval is controlled via MAP_LINE_STEP parameter. The coordinates are written  to
              file or to standard output if no file is specified.

       -B[p|s]parameters (more ...)
              Set map boundary frame and axes attributes.

       -D[unit]xmin/xmax/ymin/ymax[r][+sfile][+t]                                               |
       -D[g|j|J|n|x]refpoint+wwidth[/height][+jjustify][+odx[/dy]][+sfile][+t]
              Draw a simple map insert box on the map.  Requires -F.  Specify the box in  one  of
              three  ways:  (a)  Give  west/east/south/north  of  geographic rectangle bounded by
              parallels and meridians; append r if the coordinates instead are the lower left and
              upper  right  corners  of  the  desired rectangle. (b) Give uxmin/xmax/ymin/ymax of
              bounding rectangle in projected coordinates (here, u is the coordinate unit).   (c)
              Give  the  reference  point  on the map for the insert using one of four coordinate
              systems: (1) Use -Dg for map (user) coordinates, (2) use -Dj  or  -DJ  for  setting
              refpoint  via a 2-char justification code that refers to the (invisible) map domain
              rectangle, (3) use -Dn for normalized (0-1) coordinates, or (4) use  -Dx  for  plot
              coordinates  (inches,  cm, etc.).  Append +wwidth[/height] of bounding rectangle or
              box in plot coordinates (inches, cm, etc.).  By default, the anchor  point  on  the
              scale  is  assumed  to  be  the bottom left corner (BL), but this can be changed by
              appending +j followed by a 2-char justification code justify (see  pstext).   Note:
              If  -Dj  is used then justify defaults to the same as refpoint, if -DJ is used then
              justify defaults to the mirror opposite of refpoint.  Add +o to  offset  the  inset
              fig  by  dx/dy away from the refpoint point in the direction implied by justify (or
              the direction implied by -Dj or -DJ).  If you need access to the placement  of  the
              lower left corner of the map insert and its dimensions in the current map unit, use
              +sfile to write this information to file.  Alternatively,  you  may  append  +t  to
              translate  the  plot  origin  to  the lower left corner of the map insert.  Specify
              insert box attributes via the -F option [outline only].

       -F[d|l|t][+cclearances][+gfill][+i[[gap/]pen]][+p[pen]][+r[radius]][+s[[dx/dy/][shade]]]
              Without further options, draws a rectangular border around any map insert (-D), map
              scale  (-L)  or  map  rose  (-T)  using MAP_FRAME_PEN; specify a different pen with
              +ppen.  Add +gfill to fill the  logo  box  [no  fill].   Append  +cclearance  where
              clearance  is  either  gap, xgap/ygap, or lgap/rgap/bgap/tgap where these items are
              uniform, separate in x- and y-direction, or individual side spacings  between  logo
              and  border.  Append +i to draw a secondary, inner border as well. We use a uniform
              gap between  borders  of  2p  and  the  MAP_DEFAULT_PEN  unless  other  values  are
              specified.  Append +r to draw rounded rectangular borders instead, with a 6p corner
              radius. You can override this radius by appending another value. Finally, append +s
              to  draw  an  offset  background  shaded  region.  Here,  dx/dy indicates the shift
              relative to the foreground frame [4p/-4p] and shade sets the fill style to use  for
              shading  [gray50].   Used  in  combination  with  -D, -L or -T. To specify separate
              parameters for the various map features, append   d|l|t  to  -F  to  specify  panel
              parameters  for  just  that  panel  [Default uses the same panel parameters for all
              selected map features].

       -Jz|Zparameters (more ...)
              Set z-axis scaling; same syntax as -Jx.

       -K (more ...)
              Do not finalize the PostScript plot.

       -L[g|j|J|n|x]refpoint+c[slon/]slat+wlength[e|f|k|M|n|u][+aalign][+f][+jjustify][+l[label]][+odx[/dy]][+u]
              Draws  a  simple  map  scale centered on the reference point specified using one of
              four coordinate systems: (1) Use -Lg for map (user) coordinates, (2) use -Lj or -LJ
              for setting refpoint via a 2-char justification code that refers to the (invisible)
              map domain rectangle, (3) use -Ln for normalized (0-1) coordinates, or (4) use  -Lx
              for  plot  coordinates  (inches,  cm, etc.).  Scale is calculated for latitude slat
              (optionally supply longitude slon  for  oblique  projections  [Default  is  central
              meridian]),  length  is  in  km, or append unit from e|f|k|M|n|u.  Change the label
              alignment with +aalign (choose among l(eft), r(ight), t(op), and b(ottom)).  Append
              +f  to get a "fancy" scale [Default is plain].  By default, the anchor point on the
              map scale is assumed to be the center of the scale (MC), but this can be changed by
              appending  +j  followed by a 2-char justification code justify (see pstext for list
              and explanation of codes).  Append +l to select the default label, which equals the
              distance  unit  (meter,  foot,  km,  mile,  nautical  mile,  US survey foot) and is
              justified on top of the scale [t]. Change this by giving  your  own  label  (append
              +llabel).   Add  +o  to offset the map scale by dx/dy away from the refpoint in the
              direction implied by justify (or the direction implied by -Dj or -DJ).   Select  +u
              to  append  the  unit  to  all  distance annotations along the scale (for the plain
              scale, +u will instead select the unit to be  appended  to  the  distance  length).
              Note:  Use FONT_LABEL to change the label font and FONT_ANNOT_PRIMARY to change the
              annotation font.  The height of the map scale is  controlled  by  MAP_SCALE_HEIGHT,
              and  the  pen  thickness  is set by MAP_TICK_PEN_PRIMARY.  See -F on how to place a
              panel behind the scale.

       -O (more ...)
              Append to existing PostScript plot.

       -P (more ...)
              Select "Portrait" plot orientation.

       -Td[g|j|J|n|x]refpoint+wwidth[+f[level]][+jjustify][+lw,e,s,n][+odx[/dy]]
              -Td draws a map directional rose  on  the  map  at  the  location  defined  by  the
              reference and anchor points: Give the reference point on the map for the rose using
              one of four coordinate systems: (1) Use g for map (user) coordinates, (2) use j for
              setting refpoint via a 2-char justification code that refers to the (invisible) map
              domain rectangle, (3) use n for normalized (0-1) coordinates, or (4) use x for plot
              coordinates  (inches,  cm,  etc.) [Default].  You can offset the reference point by
              dx/dy in the direction implied by justify.  By default, the  anchor  point  on  the
              scale  is  assumed  to  be  the center of the rose (MC), but this can be changed by
              appending +j followed by a 2-char justification code justify (see pstext  for  list
              and  explanation of codes).  Note: If -Dj is used then justify defaults to the same
              as refpoint, if -DJ is used  then  justify  defaults  to  the  mirror  opposite  of
              refpoint.   Add +o to offset the color scale by dx/dy away from the refpoint in the
              direction implied by justify (or the direction implied  by  -Dj  or  -DJ).   Append
              +wwidth  to  set  the  width  of  the  rose  in plot coordinates (in inches, cm, or
              points).  Add +f to get a "fancy" rose, and specify in level what you  want  drawn.
              The  default  [1]  draws  the  two  principal E-W, N-S orientations, 2 adds the two
              intermediate  NW-SE  and  NE-SW  orientations,  while  3  adds  the   eight   minor
              orientations  WNW-ESE,  NNW-SSE,  NNE-SSW,  and ENE-WSW.  Label the cardinal points
              W,E,S,N by adding +l and append your own four comma-separated strings  to  override
              the default.  Skip a specific label by leaving it blank.  See Placing-dir-map-roses
              and -F on how to place a panel behind the scale.

       -Tm[g|j|J|n|x]refpoint+wwidth[+ddec[/dlabel]]][+ipen][+jjustify][+lw,e,s,n][+ppen][+tints][+odx[/dy]]
          -Tm  draws  a map magnetic rose on the map at the location defined by the reference and
          anchor points: Give the reference point on the map for  the  rose  using  one  of  four
          coordinate  systems:  (1)  Use  g  for  map  (user)  coordinates, (2) use j for setting
          refpoint via a 2-char justification code that refers  to  the  (invisible)  map  domain
          rectangle,  (3)  use  n  for  normalized  (0-1)  coordinates,  or  (4)  use  x for plot
          coordinates (inches, cm, etc.) [Default]. You can offset the reference point  by  dx/dy
          in  the  direction  implied  by  justify.  By default, the anchor point on the scale is
          assumed to be the center of the rose (MC), but this can  be  changed  by  appending  +j
          followed by a 2-char justification code justify (see pstext for list and explanation of
          codes).  Note: If -Dj is used then justify defaults to the same as refpoint, if -DJ  is
          used  then  justify  defaults to the mirror opposite of refpoint.  Add +o to offset the
          color scale by dx/dy away from the refpoint in the direction implied by justify (or the
          direction  implied by -Dj or -DJ).  Append +wwidth to set the width of the rose in plot
          coordinates (in inches, cm, or points).  Use +d to assign the magnetic declination  and
          set  dlabel,  which is a label for the magnetic compass needle (Leave empty to format a
          label from dec, or give - to bypass labeling). With +d, both directions  to  geographic
          and  magnetic  north  are plotted [Default is geographic only]. If the north label is *
          then a north star is plotted instead of the north label. Annotation and two  levels  of
          tick  intervals  for both geographic and magnetic directions default to 30/5/1 degrees;
          override these settings by appending +tints, and append six  slash-separated  intervals
          to  set  both  the geographic (first three) and magnetic (last three) intervals.  Label
          the cardinal points W,E,S,N by adding +l  and  append  your  own  four  comma-separated
          strings  to  override  the default.  Skip a specific label by leaving it blank.  Number
          GMT default parameters control pens, fonts, and color.  See  Placing-dir-map-roses  and
          -F on how to place a panel behind the scale.

       -U[[just]/dx/dy/][c|label] (more ...)
              Draw GMT time stamp logo on plot.

       -V[level] (more ...)
              Select verbosity level [c].

       -X[a|c|f|r][x-shift[u]]

       -Y[a|c|f|r][y-shift[u]] (more ...)
              Shift plot origin.

       -f[i|o]colinfo (more ...)
              Specify  data  types  of  input  and/or  output  columns.  This applies only to the
              coordinates specified in the -R option.

       -p[x|y|z]azim[/elev[/zlevel]][+wlon0/lat0[/z0]][+vx0/y0] (more ...)
              Select perspective view.

       -t[transp] (more ...)
              Set PDF transparency level in percent.

       -^ or just -
              Print a short message about the syntax of the command, then exits (NOTE: on Windows
              just use -).

       -+ or just +
              Print  an  extensive  usage  (help)  message,  including  the  explanation  of  any
              module-specific option (but not the GMT common options), then exits.

       -? or no arguments
              Print a complete usage (help) message, including the explanation  of  all  options,
              then exits.

EXAMPLES

       The  following  section illustrates the use of the options by giving some examples for the
       available map projections. Note  how  scales  may  be  given  in  several  different  ways
       depending  on the projection. Also note the use of upper case letters to specify map width
       instead of map scale.

NON-GEOGRAPHICAL PROJECTIONS

   Linear x-y plot
       To make a linear x/y frame with all axes, but with only left and  bottom  axes  annotated,
       using xscale = yscale = 1.0, ticking every 1 unit and annotating every 2, and using xlabel
       = "Distance" and ylabel = "No of samples", use

              gmt psbasemap -R0/9/0/5 -Jx1 -Bf1a2 -Bx+lDistance -By+l"No of samples" -BWeSn > linear.ps

   Log-log plot
       To make a log-log frame with only the left and bottom axes, where the x-axis is 25 cm  and
       annotated  every  1-2-5  and  the  y-axis is 15 cm and annotated every power of 10 but has
       tick-marks every 0.1, run

              gmt psbasemap -R1/10000/1e20/1e25 -JX25cl/15cl -Bx2+lWavelength -Bya1pf3+lPower -BWS > loglog.ps

   Power axes
       To design an axis system to be used for a depth-sqrt(age) plot with depth  positive  down,
       ticked and annotated every 500m, and ages annotated at 1 my, 4 my, 9 my etc, use

              gmt psbasemap -R0/100/0/5000 -Jx1p0.5/-0.001 -Bx1p+l"Crustal age" -By500+lDepth > power.ps

   Polar (theta,r) plot
       For  a  base  map  for  use with polar coordinates, where the radius from 0 to 1000 should
       correspond to 3 inch and with gridlines and ticks intervals automatically determined, use

              gmt psbasemap -R0/360/0/1000 -JP6i -Bafg > polar.ps

CYLINDRICAL MAP PROJECTIONS

   Cassini
       A 10-cm-wide basemap using the Cassini projection may be obtained by

              gmt psbasemap -R20/50/20/35 -JC35/28/10c -P -Bafg -B+tCassini > cassini.ps

   Mercator [conformal]
       A Mercator map with scale 0.025 inch/degree along equator, and showing the length of  5000
       km along the equator (centered on 1/1 inch), may be plotted as

              gmt psbasemap -R90/180/-50/50 -Jm0.025i -Bafg -B+tMercator -Lx1i/1i+c0+w5000k > mercator.ps

   Miller
       A global Miller cylindrical map with scale 1:200,000,000 may be plotted as

              gmt psbasemap -Rg -Jj180/1:200000000 -Bafg -B+tMiller > miller.ps

   Oblique Mercator [conformal]
       To create a page-size global oblique Mercator basemap for a pole at (90,30) with gridlines
       every 30 degrees, run

              gmt psbasemap -R0/360/-70/70 -Joc0/0/90/30/0.064cd -B30g30 -B+t"Oblique Mercator" > oblmerc.ps

   Transverse Mercator [conformal]
       A regular Transverse Mercator basemap for some region may look like

              gmt psbasemap -R69:30/71:45/-17/-15:15 -Jt70/1:1000000 -Bafg -B+t"Survey area" -P > transmerc.ps

   Equidistant Cylindrical Projection
       This projection only needs the central meridian and scale. A 25  cm  wide  global  basemap
       centered on the 130E meridian is made by

              gmt psbasemap -R-50/310/-90/90 -JQ130/25c -Bafg -B+t"Equidistant Cylindrical" > cyl_eqdist.ps

   Universal Transverse Mercator [conformal]
       To  use  this  projection  you  must  know  the UTM zone number, which defines the central
       meridian. A UTM basemap for Indo-China can be plotted as

              gmt psbasemap -R95/5/108/20r -Ju46/1:10000000 -Bafg -B+tUTM > utm.ps

   Cylindrical Equal-Area
       First select which of the cylindrical equal-area projections you want by deciding  on  the
       standard  parallel.  Here we will use 45 degrees which gives the Gall projection. A 9 inch
       wide global basemap centered on the Pacific is made by

              gmt psbasemap -Rg -JY180/45/9i -Bafg -B+tGall > gall.ps

CONIC MAP PROJECTIONS

   Albers [equal-area]
       A basemap for middle Europe may be created by

              gmt psbasemap -R0/90/25/55 -Jb45/20/32/45/0.25c -Bafg -B+t"Albers Equal-area" > albers.ps

   Lambert [conformal]
       Another basemap for middle Europe may be created by

              gmt psbasemap -R0/90/25/55 -Jl45/20/32/45/0.1i -Bafg -B+t"Lambert Conformal Conic" > lambertc.ps

   Equidistant
       Yet another basemap of width 6 inch for middle Europe may be created by

              gmt psbasemap -R0/90/25/55 -JD45/20/32/45/6i -Bafg -B+t"Equidistant conic" > econic.ps

   Polyconic
       A basemap for north America may be created by

              gmt psbasemap -R-180/-20/0/90 -JPoly/4i -Bafg -B+tPolyconic > polyconic.ps

AZIMUTHAL MAP PROJECTIONS

   Lambert [equal-area]
       A 15-cm-wide global view of the world  from  the  vantage  point  -80/-30  will  give  the
       following basemap:

              gmt psbasemap -Rg -JA-80/-30/15c -Bafg -B+t"Lambert Azimuthal" > lamberta.ps

       Follow  the  instructions  for  stereographic projection if you want to impose rectangular
       boundaries on the azimuthal equal-area map but substitute -Ja for -Js.

   Equidistant
       A 15-cm-wide global map in which distances from the center (here 125/10) to any  point  is
       true can be obtained by:

              gmt psbasemap -Rg -JE125/10/15c -Bafg -B+tEquidistant > equi.ps

   Gnomonic
       A view of the world from the vantage point -100/40 out to a horizon of 60 degrees from the
       center can be made using the Gnomonic projection:

              gmt psbasemap -Rg -JF-100/40/60/6i -Bafg -B+tGnomonic > gnomonic.ps

   Orthographic
       A global perspective (from infinite distance) view of the world  from  the  vantage  point
       125/10 will give the following 6-inch-wide basemap:

              gmt psbasemap -Rg -JG125/10/6i -Bafg -B+tOrthographic > ortho.ps

   General Perspective
       The  -JG  option  can  be  used  in a more generalized form, specifying altitude above the
       surface, width and height of the view point, and twist and tilt. A view from 160 km  above
       -74/41.5  with  a  tilt of 55 and azimuth of 210 degrees, and limiting the viewpoint to 30
       degrees width and height will product a 6-inch-wide basemap:

              gmt psbasemap -Rg -JG-74/41.5/160/210/55/30/30/6i -Bafg -B+t"General Perspective" > genper.ps

   Stereographic [conformal]
       To make a polar stereographic projection basemap  with  radius  =  12  cm  to  -60  degree
       latitude,  with  plot  title  "Salinity  measurements",  using  5  degrees annotation/tick
       interval and 1 degree gridlines, run

              gmt psbasemap -R-45/45/-90/-60 -Js0/-90/12c/-60 -B5g1 -B+t"Salinity measurements" > stereo1.ps

       To make a 12-cm-wide stereographic basemap for Australia from an arbitrary view point (not
       the  poles),  and use a rectangular boundary, we must give the pole for the new projection
       and use the -R option to indicate the lower left and upper right corners (in lon/lat) that
       will  define  our rectangle. We choose a pole at 130/-30 and use 100/-45 and 160/-5 as our
       corners. The command becomes

              gmt psbasemap -R100/-45/160/-5r -JS130/-30/12c -Bafg -B+t"General Stereographic View" > stereo2.ps

MISCELLANEOUS MAP PROJECTIONS

   Hammer [equal-area]
       The Hammer projection is mostly used for global maps and thus the spherical form is  used.
       To get a world map centered on Greenwich at a scale of 1:200000000, use

              gmt psbasemap -Rd -Jh0/1:200000000 -Bafg -B+tHammer > hammer.ps

   Sinusoidal [equal-area]
       To  make  a  sinusoidal world map centered on Greenwich, with a scale along the equator of
       0.02 inch/degree, use

              gmt psbasemap -Rd -Ji0/0.02i -Bafg -B+tSinusoidal > sinus1.ps

       To make an interrupted sinusoidal world map with breaks at 160W,  20W,  and  60E,  with  a
       scale along the equator of 0.02 inch/degree, run the following sequence of commands:

              gmt psbasemap -R-160/-20/-90/90 -Ji-90/0.02i -Bx30g30 -By15g15 -BWesn -K > sinus_i.ps
              gmt psbasemap -R-20/60/-90/90 -Ji20/0.02i -Bx30g30 -By15g15 -Bwesn -O -K -X2.8i >> sinus_i.ps
              gmt psbasemap -R60/200/-90/90 -Ji130/0.02i -Bx30g30 -By15g15 -BwEsn -O -X1.6i >> sinus_i.ps

   Eckert IV [equal-area]
       Pseudo-cylindrical  projection  typically  used  for  global  maps  only.  Set the central
       longitude and scale, e.g.,

              gmt psbasemap -Rg -Jkf180/0.064c -Bafg -B+t"Eckert IV" > eckert4.ps

   Eckert VI [equal-area]
       Another pseudo-cylindrical projection typically used for global maps only. Set the central
       longitude and scale, e.g.,

              gmt psbasemap -Rg -Jks180/0.064c -Bafg -B+t"Eckert VI" > eckert6.ps

   Robinson
       Projection designed to make global maps "look right". Set the central longitude and width,
       e.g.,

              gmt psbasemap -Rd -JN0/8i -Bafg -B+tRobinson > robinson.ps

   Winkel Tripel
       Yet another projection typically used for global  maps  only.  You  can  set  the  central
       longitude, e.g.,

              gmt psbasemap -R90/450/-90/90 -JR270/25c -Bafg -B+t"Winkel Tripel" > winkel.ps

   Mollweide [equal-area]
       The  Mollweide  projection is also mostly used for global maps and thus the spherical form
       is used. To get a 25-cm-wide world map centered on the Dateline:

              psbasemap -Rg -JW180/25c -Bafg -B+tMollweide > mollweide.ps

   Van der Grinten
       The Van der Grinten projection is also mostly used for global maps and thus the  spherical
       form is used. To get a 18-cm-wide world map centered on the Dateline:

              gmt psbasemap -Rg -JV180/18c -Bafg -B+t"Van der Grinten" > grinten.ps

   Arbitrary rotation
       If  you  need  to  plot  a  map  but have it rotated about a vertical axis then use the -p
       option.  For instance, the rotate the basemap below 90 degrees about an axis  centered  on
       the map, try

              gmt psbasemap -R10/40/10/40 -JM10c -P -Bafg -B+t"I am rotated" -p90+w25/25 -Xc > rotated.ps

CUSTOM LABELS OR INTERVALS

       The  -B  option  sets up a regular annotation interval and the annotations derive from the
       corresponding x, y, or z coordinates.  However, some applications requires special control
       on  which  annotations  to plot and even replace the annotation with other labels. This is
       achieved by using cintfile in the -B option, where intfile contains  all  the  information
       about  annotations,  ticks,  and  even  gridlines.  Each  record is of the form coord type
       [label], where coord is the coordinate for this annotation (or tick or gridline), type  is
       one  or  more  letters  from  a  (annotation),  i  interval  annotation, f tickmark, and g
       gridline. Note that a and i are mutually exclusive and cannot  both  appear  in  the  same
       intfile. Both a and i requires you to supply a label which is used as the plot annotation.
       If not given then a regular formatted annotation based on the coordinate will occur.

RESTRICTIONS

       For some projections, a spherical earth is implicitly assumed. A warning will  notify  the
       user if -V is set.

BUGS

       The  -B  option  is somewhat complicated to explain and comprehend.  However, it is fairly
       simple for most applications (see examples).

SEE ALSO

       gmt, gmt.conf, gmtcolors

COPYRIGHT

       2019, P. Wessel, W. H. F. Smith, R. Scharroo, J. Luis, and F. Wobbe