Provided by: scamper_20181219-1_amd64 bug

NAME

     sc_filterpolicy — scamper driver to test systems for congruent filtering policy

SYNOPSIS

     sc_filterpolicy [-D] [-a input-file] [-l log-file] [-o output-file] [-O options]
                     [-p scamper-port] [-t host-type] [-T test] [-U scamper-unix]

     sc_filterpolicy [-r data-file]

DESCRIPTION

     The sc_filterpolicy utility provides the ability to connect to a running scamper(1) instance
     and use that instance to test systems for congruent filtering policy.  The utility tests
     each system specified in the input file by probing for application reachability with ICMP,
     UDP, and TCP probes, using both IPv4 and IPv6 where applicable.  Each system in the input
     file should have multiple IP addresses specified; the driver probes each IP address on each
     system one at a time to avoid causing the remote system to rate-limit responses.
     sc_filterpolicy obtains speed by probing systems in parallel, though it may appear to
     operate slowly because no progress is reported until all addresses belonging to a device
     have been tested one at a time.

     The applications supported by sc_filterpolicy to test filtering policy are:
       -  ICMP: test responsiveness to ICMP echo request packets.  We classify the IP address as
          responsive to ICMP echo requests if it sends an ICMP echo reply.
       -  NetBIOS: test responsiveness to TCP SYN packets sent to port 139 (the NetBIOS port).
          We classify the IP address as responsive if it sends a SYN/ACK.
       -  MSSQL: test responsiveness to TCP SYN packets sent to port 1433 (the Microsoft SQL
          server default port).  We classify the IP address as responsive if it sends a SYN/ACK.
       -  FTP: test responsiveness to TCP SYN packets sent to port 21 (the default port for FTP
          control connections).  We classify the IP address as responsive if it sends a SYN/ACK.
       -  SSH: test responsiveness to TCP SYN packets sent to port 22 (the default port for SSH).
          We classify the IP address as responsive if it sends a SYN/ACK.
       -  Telnet: test responsiveness to TCP SYN packets sent to port 23 (the default port for
          telnet).  We classify the IP address as responsive if it sends a SYN/ACK.
       -  MySQL: test responsiveness to TCP SYN packets sent to port 3306 (the default port for
          MySQL).  We classify the IP address as responsive if it sends a SYN/ACK.
       -  RDP: test responsiveness to TCP SYN packets sent to port 3389 (the default port for
          RDP).  We classify the IP address as responsive if it sends a SYN/ACK.
       -  HTTPS: test responsiveness to TCP SYN packets sent to port 443 (the default port for
          HTTPS).  We classify the IP address as responsive if it sends a SYN/ACK.
       -  SMB: test responsiveness to TCP SYN packets sent to port 445 (the default port for
          SMB).  We classify the IP address as responsive if it sends a SYN/ACK.
       -  HTTP: test responsiveness to TCP SYN packets sent to port 80 (the default port for
          HTTP).  We classify the IP address as responsive if it sends a SYN/ACK.
       -  BGP: test responsiveness to TCP SYN packets sent to port 179 (the default port for
          BGP).  We classify the IP address as responsive if it sends a SYN/ACK.
       -  NTP: test responsiveness to UDP packets sent to port 123 (the default port for NTP)
          with an NTP version request payload.  We classify the IP address as responsive if it
          sends a UDP response.
       -  DNS: test responsiveness to UDP packets sent to port 53 (the default port for DNS) with
          a query for www.google.com.  We classify the IP address as responsive if it sends a UDP
          response.
       -  SNMP: test responsiveness to UDP packets sent to port 161 (the default port for SNMP)
          with a get for sysDescr via the public community using the SNMPv2c protocol.  We
          classify the IP address as responsive if it sends a UDP response.
       -  VNC: test responsiveness to TCP SYN packets sent to port 5900 (the default port for
          VNC).  We classify the IP address as responsive if it sends a SYN/ACK.

     The options supported by sc_filterpolicy are as follows:

     -?      prints a list of command line options and a synopsis of each.

     -a input-file
             specifies the name of the input file which consists of a sequence of systems to
             test.  See the examples section for input-file formatting examples.

     -D      with this option set, sc_filterpolicy will detach and become a daemon.

     -l log-file
             specifies the name of a file to log progress output from sc_filterpolicy generated
             at run time.

     -o output-file
             specifies the name of the file to be written.  The output file will use the warts(5)
             format.

     -O options
             allows the behavior of sc_filterpolicy to be further tailored.  The current choices
             for this option are:
               -  impatient: order the systems found in the input-file so that those with the
                  most addresses are probed first, so that probing will complete as fast as
                  possible.
               -  incongruent: only report systems which are inferred to have an incongruent
                  filtering policy.
               -  trace: probe the addresses found in the input-file using traceroute, rather
                  than ping.
               -  tuples: signals that the input-file is formatted as tuples, rather than rows.
                  See the examples section for more information.

     -p scamper-port
             specifies the port on the local host where scamper(1) is accepting control socket
             connections.

     -r data-file
             specifies the name of a previously collected filter policy data file, in warts(5)
             format, to read and analyse.

     -t probe-class
             specifies the class of probes to send for each IP address in the input file.  The
             current choices for this option are:
               -  router: test ICMP, SSH, Telnet, HTTPS, HTTP, BGP, NTP, DNS, and SNMP.
               -  server: test ICMP, FTP, SSH, Telnet, MySQL, RDP, HTTPS, SMB, HTTP, NTP, DNS,
                  and SNMP.
               -  all: test ICMP, NetBIOS, MSSQL, FTP, SSH, Telnet, MySQL, RDP, HTTPS, SMB, VNC,
                  HTTP, BGP, NTP, DNS, and SNMP.

     -T test
             specifies adjustments to the test schedule from the supported application types.
             Prefacing an application with + causes the application type to be added to the test
             schedule, and prefacing an application with - causes the application type to be
             removed from the test schedule.

     -U scamper-unix
             specifies the unix domain socket on the local host where scamper(1) is accepting
             control socket connections.

EXAMPLES

     sc_filterpolicy requires a scamper(1) instance listening on a port or unix domain socket for
     commands in order to collect data:

        scamper -P 31337

     will start a scamper(1) instance listening on port 31337 on the loopback interface.  To use
     sc_filterpolicy to test the filtering policy of a set of routers specified in a file named
     routers.txt and formatted as rows as follows:

        foo.example.com 192.0.2.1 2001:DB8::1
        bar.example.com 192.0.2.2 2001:DB8::2

     the following command will test these routers for responsiveness to ICMP, SSH, Telnet,
     HTTPS, HTTP, BGP, NTP, DNS, and SNMP probes, recording raw data into example-routers.warts:

        sc_filterpolicy -p 31337 -a routers.txt -t router -o example-routers.warts

     Including the name of each device in the input file is optional.

     The following command will only test the routers for responsiveness to SSH:

        sc_filterpolicy -p 31337 -a routers.txt -T +ssh -o example-ssh.warts

     To use sc_filterpolicy to test the filtering policy of a set of servers specified in a file
     named servers.txt and formatted as tuples as follows:

        db.example.com 192.0.2.3
        db.example.com 2001::DB8::3
        corp.example.com 192.0.2.4
        corp.example.com 2001::DB8::4

     the following command will test these servers for responsiveness to ICMP, FTP, SSH, Telnet,
     MySQL, RDP, HTTPS, SMB, HTTP, NTP, DNS, and SNMP probes, recording raw data into example-
     servers.warts:

        sc_filterpolicy -p 31337 -a servers.txt -t server -o example-servers.warts -O tuples

     In an input file formatted as tuples, the name (or an identifier) for each device is
     mandatory, and is used to ensure only one probe is sent to any one device at a time, and to
     collate responses from different addresses to the same device for reporting.

     Once raw data has been collected, sc_filterpolicy can be used to analyse the collected data.
     For the example-routers.warts file, the following command dumps a summary of the data
     collected for each router:

        sc_filterpolicy -r example-routers.warts

                    :        T
                    :        e  H
                    :  I     l  T  H           S
                    :  C  S  n  T  T  B  N  D  N
                    :  M  S  e  P  T  G  T  N  M
                    :  P  H  t  S  P  P  P  S  P
        ========================================
        192.0.2.1   :  O  O        O        O  O
        2001:DB8::1 :  O  O        O        O  O

        192.0.2.2   :  O  X
        2001:DB8::2 :  O  O

     The first router is responsive (O) for ICMP, SSH, HTTP, DNS, and SNMP probes on all
     addresses.  The second router is responsive (O) to ICMP probes on both addresses is
     unresponsive (X) to SSH on the IPv4 address, but is responsive (O) to SSH on the IPv6
     address and possibly represents a filtering policy that is incongruent and requires
     attention.  Note that the empty cells in the table represent a router that was unresponsive
     (X) to that protocol for all addresses tested; the cells are left empty to allow the user to
     focus on open and incongruent application services.

     The command:

        sc_filterpolicy -O incongruent -r example-routers.warts

     will only show routers with an incongruent filtering policy.

SEE ALSO

     J. Czyz, M. Luckie, M. Allman, and M. Bailey, Don't Forget to Lock the Back Door! A
     Characterization of IPv6 Network Security Policy, Proc. Network and Distributed Systems
     Security (NDSS) Conference 2016.  scamper(1), sc_wartsdump(1), sc_warts2json(1), warts(5)

AUTHORS

     sc_filterpolicy was written by Matthew Luckie <mjl@luckie.org.nz> and Jakub Czyz.