Provided by: libdata-streamserializer-perl_0.07-1build9_amd64 bug

NAME

       Data::StreamSerializer - non-blocking serializer.

SYNOPSIS

         use Data::StreamSerializer;

         my $sr = new Data::StreamSerializer('You data');

         while(defined(my $part = $sr->next)) {
             print $socket $part;
         }

DESCRIPTION

       Sometimes You need to serialize a lot of data. If You use 'Dumper' it can take You for
       much time. If Your code is executed in event machine it can be inadmissible. So using the
       module You can serialize Your data progressively and do something between serialization
       itearions.

       This module works slower than Data::Dumper, but it can serialize object progressively and
       You can do something else between serialization iterations.

   Recognized types.
       HASH

       ARRAY

       REF

       Regexp

       SCALAR

METHODS

   new
       Constructor. All arguments will be serialized.

   next
       Returns next part of serialized string or undef if all data were serialized.

   block_size
       Block size for one iteration. Too small value allows You to spend less time for each
       iteration, but in this case total serialization time will grow.  Nod bad choice to set the
       value between 200 - 2000 bytes (default value is 512). See BENCHMARKS to make a decision.

   recursion_depth
       If serialized object has recursive references, they will be replaced by empty objects. But
       if this value is higher than 1 recursion will be reserialized until the value is reached.

       Example:

           my $t = { a => 'b' };
           $t->{c} = $t;

       This example will be serialized into string:

           {"c",{"c",{},"a","b"},"a","b"}

       and if You increment recursion_depth, this example will be serialized into string:
           {"c",{"c",{"c",{},"a","b"},"a","b"},"a","b"}

       etc.

   recursion_detected
       Returns TRUE if a recursion was detected.

   is_eof
       Returns TRUE if eof is reached. If it is TRUE the following next will return undef.

SEE ALSO

       Data::StreamDeserializer.

BENCHMARKS

       You can try a few scripts in benchmark/ directory. There are a few test arrays in this
       directory.

       Here are a few test results of my system.

   Array which contains 100 hashes:
           $ perl benchmark/vs_dumper.pl -n 1000 -b 512 benchmark/tests/01_100x10
           38296 bytes were read
           First serializing by eval... done
           First serializing by Data::StreamSerializer... done
           Starting 1000 iterations for Dumper... done (40.376 seconds)
           Starting 1000 iterations for Data::StreamSerializer... done (137.960 seconds)

           Dumper statistic:
                   1000 iterations were done
                   maximum serialization time: 0.0867 seconds
                   minimum serialization time: 0.0396 seconds
                   average serialization time: 0.0404 seconds

           Data::StreamSerializer statistic:
                   1000 iterations were done
                   58000 SUBiterations were done
                   maximum serialization time: 0.1585 seconds
                   minimum serialization time: 0.1356 seconds
                   average serialization time: 0.1380 seconds
                   average subiteration  time: 0.00238 seconds

   Array which contains 1000 hashes:
           $  perl benchmark/vs_dumper.pl -n 1000 -b 512 benchmark/tests/02_1000x10
           355623 bytes were read
           First serializing by eval... done
           First serializing by Data::StreamSerializer... done
           Starting 1000 iterations for Dumper... done (405.334 seconds)
           Starting 1000 iterations for Data::StreamSerializer... done (1407.899 seconds)

           Dumper statistic:
                   1000 iterations were done
                   maximum serialization time: 0.4564 seconds
                   minimum serialization time: 0.4018 seconds
                   average serialization time: 0.4053 seconds

           Data::StreamSerializer statistic:
                   1000 iterations were done
                   520000 SUBiterations were done
                   maximum serialization time: 2.0050 seconds
                   minimum serialization time: 1.3862 seconds
                   average serialization time: 1.4079 seconds
                   average subiteration  time: 0.00271 seconds

       You can see that in any cases one iteration gets the same time.

AUTHOR

       Dmitry E. Oboukhov, <unera@debian.org>

COPYRIGHT AND LICENSE

       Copyright (C) 2011 by Dmitry E. Oboukhov

       This library is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the same
       terms as Perl itself, either Perl version 5.10.1 or, at your option, any later version of
       Perl 5 you may have available.

VCS

       The project is placed in my git repo. See here:
       <http://git.uvw.ru/?p=data-stream-serializer;a=summary>