Provided by: libexcel-writer-xlsx-perl_0.99-1_all bug

NAME

       Examples - Excel::Writer::XLSX example programs.

DESCRIPTION

       This is a documentation only module showing the examples that are included in the
       Excel::Writer::XLSX distribution.

       This file was auto-generated via the gen_examples_pod.pl program that is also included in
       the examples directory.

Example programs

       The following is a list of the 87 example programs that are included in the
       Excel::Writer::XLSX distribution.

       ·   "Example: a_simple.pl" A simple demo of some of the features.

       ·   "Example: bug_report.pl" A template for submitting bug reports.

       ·   "Example: demo.pl" A demo of some of the available features.

       ·   "Example: formats.pl" All the available formatting on several worksheets.

       ·   "Example: regions.pl" A simple example of multiple worksheets.

       ·   "Example: stats.pl" Basic formulas and functions.

       ·   "Example: autofilter.pl" Examples of worksheet autofilters.

       ·   "Example: array_formula.pl" Examples of how to write array formulas.

       ·   "Example: cgi.pl" A simple CGI program.

       ·   "Example: chart_area.pl" A demo of area style charts.

       ·   "Example: chart_bar.pl" A demo of bar (vertical histogram) style charts.

       ·   "Example: chart_column.pl" A demo of column (histogram) style charts.

       ·   "Example: chart_line.pl" A demo of line style charts.

       ·   "Example: chart_pie.pl" A demo of pie style charts.

       ·   "Example: chart_doughnut.pl" A demo of dougnut style charts.

       ·   "Example: chart_radar.pl" A demo of radar style charts.

       ·   "Example: chart_scatter.pl" A demo of scatter style charts.

       ·   "Example: chart_secondary_axis.pl" A demo of a line chart with a secondary axis.

       ·   "Example: chart_combined.pl" A demo of a combined column and line chart.

       ·   "Example: chart_pareto.pl" A demo of a combined Pareto chart.

       ·   "Example: chart_stock.pl" A demo of stock style charts.

       ·   "Example: chart_data_table.pl" A demo of a chart with a data table on the axis.

       ·   "Example: chart_data_tools.pl" A demo of charts with data highlighting options.

       ·   "Example: chart_clustered.pl" A demo of a chart with a clustered axis.

       ·   "Example: chart_styles.pl" A demo of the available chart styles.

       ·   "Example: colors.pl" A demo of the colour palette and named colours.

       ·   "Example: comments1.pl" Add comments to worksheet cells.

       ·   "Example: comments2.pl" Add comments with advanced options.

       ·   "Example: conditional_format.pl" Add conditional formats to a range of cells.

       ·   "Example: data_validate.pl" An example of data validation and dropdown lists.

       ·   "Example: date_time.pl" Write dates and times with write_date_time().

       ·   "Example: defined_name.pl" Example of how to create defined names.

       ·   "Example: diag_border.pl" A simple example of diagonal cell borders.

       ·   "Example: filehandle.pl" Examples of working with filehandles.

       ·   "Example: headers.pl" Examples of worksheet headers and footers.

       ·   "Example: hide_row_col.pl" Example of hiding rows and columns.

       ·   "Example: hide_sheet.pl" Simple example of hiding a worksheet.

       ·   "Example: hyperlink1.pl" Shows how to create web hyperlinks.

       ·   "Example: hyperlink2.pl" Examples of internal and external hyperlinks.

       ·   "Example: indent.pl" An example of cell indentation.

       ·   "Example: macros.pl" An example of adding macros from an existing file.

       ·   "Example: merge1.pl" A simple example of cell merging.

       ·   "Example: merge2.pl" A simple example of cell merging with formatting.

       ·   "Example: merge3.pl" Add hyperlinks to merged cells.

       ·   "Example: merge4.pl" An advanced example of merging with formatting.

       ·   "Example: merge5.pl" An advanced example of merging with formatting.

       ·   "Example: merge6.pl" An example of merging with Unicode strings.

       ·   "Example: mod_perl1.pl" A simple mod_perl 1 program.

       ·   "Example: mod_perl2.pl" A simple mod_perl 2 program.

       ·   "Example: outline.pl" An example of outlines and grouping.

       ·   "Example: outline_collapsed.pl" An example of collapsed outlines.

       ·   "Example: panes.pl" An example of how to create panes.

       ·   "Example: properties.pl" Add document properties to a workbook.

       ·   "Example: protection.pl" Example of cell locking and formula hiding.

       ·   "Example: rich_strings.pl" Example of strings with multiple formats.

       ·   "Example: right_to_left.pl" Change default sheet direction to right to left.

       ·   "Example: sales.pl" An example of a simple sales spreadsheet.

       ·   "Example: shape1.pl" Insert shapes in worksheet.

       ·   "Example: shape2.pl" Insert shapes in worksheet. With properties.

       ·   "Example: shape3.pl" Insert shapes in worksheet. Scaled.

       ·   "Example: shape4.pl" Insert shapes in worksheet. With modification.

       ·   "Example: shape5.pl" Insert shapes in worksheet. With connections.

       ·   "Example: shape6.pl" Insert shapes in worksheet. With connections.

       ·   "Example: shape7.pl" Insert shapes in worksheet. One to many connections.

       ·   "Example: shape8.pl" Insert shapes in worksheet. One to many connections.

       ·   "Example: shape_all.pl" Demo of all the available shape and connector types.

       ·   "Example: sparklines1.pl" Simple sparklines demo.

       ·   "Example: sparklines2.pl" Sparklines demo showing formatting options.

       ·   "Example: stats_ext.pl" Same as stats.pl with external references.

       ·   "Example: stocks.pl" Demonstrates conditional formatting.

       ·   "Example: tab_colors.pl" Example of how to set worksheet tab colours.

       ·   "Example: tables.pl" Add Excel tables to a worksheet.

       ·   "Example: write_handler1.pl" Example of extending the write() method. Step 1.

       ·   "Example: write_handler2.pl" Example of extending the write() method. Step 2.

       ·   "Example: write_handler3.pl" Example of extending the write() method. Step 3.

       ·   "Example: write_handler4.pl" Example of extending the write() method. Step 4.

       ·   "Example: write_to_scalar.pl" Example of writing an Excel file to a Perl scalar.

       ·   "Example: unicode_2022_jp.pl" Japanese: ISO-2022-JP.

       ·   "Example: unicode_8859_11.pl" Thai:     ISO-8859_11.

       ·   "Example: unicode_8859_7.pl" Greek:    ISO-8859_7.

       ·   "Example: unicode_big5.pl" Chinese:  BIG5.

       ·   "Example: unicode_cp1251.pl" Russian:  CP1251.

       ·   "Example: unicode_cp1256.pl" Arabic:   CP1256.

       ·   "Example: unicode_cyrillic.pl" Russian:  Cyrillic.

       ·   "Example: unicode_koi8r.pl" Russian:  KOI8-R.

       ·   "Example: unicode_polish_utf8.pl" Polish :  UTF8.

       ·   "Example: unicode_shift_jis.pl" Japanese: Shift JIS.

   Example: a_simple.pl
       A simple example of how to use the Excel::Writer::XLSX module to write text and numbers to
       an Excel xlsx file.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl -w

           #######################################################################
           #
           # A simple example of how to use the Excel::Writer::XLSX module to
           # write text and numbers to an Excel xlsx file.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), March 2001, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           # Create a new workbook called simple.xls and add a worksheet
           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'a_simple.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();

           # The general syntax is write($row, $column, $token). Note that row and
           # column are zero indexed
           #

           # Write some text
           $worksheet->write( 0, 0, "Hi Excel!" );

           # Write some numbers
           $worksheet->write( 2, 0, 3 );          # Writes 3
           $worksheet->write( 3, 0, 3.00000 );    # Writes 3
           $worksheet->write( 4, 0, 3.00001 );    # Writes 3.00001
           $worksheet->write( 5, 0, 3.14159 );    # TeX revision no.?

           # Write some formulas
           $worksheet->write( 7, 0, '=A3 + A6' );
           $worksheet->write( 8, 0, '=IF(A5>3,"Yes", "No")' );

           # Write a hyperlink
           $worksheet->write( 10, 0, 'http://www.perl.com/' );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/a_simple.pl>

   Example: bug_report.pl
       A template for submitting a bug report.

       Run this program and read the output from the command line.

           #!/usr/bin/perl -w

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # A template for submitting a bug report.
           #
           # Run this program and read the output from the command line.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), March 2004, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;

           print << 'HINTS_1';

           REPORTING A BUG OR ASKING A QUESTION

               Feel free to report bugs or ask questions. However, to save time
               consider the following steps first:

               Read the documentation:

                   The Excel::Writer::XLSX documentation has been refined in
                   response to user questions. Therefore, if you have a question it is
                   possible that someone else has asked it before you and that it is
                   already addressed in the documentation. Since there is a lot of
                   documentation to get through you should at least read the table of
                   contents and search for keywords that you are interested in.

               Look at the example programs:

                   There are over 80 example programs shipped with the standard
                   Excel::Writer::XLSX distribution. Many of these were created
                   in response to user questions. Try to identify an example program
                   that corresponds to your query and adapt it to your needs.

           HINTS_1
           print "Press enter ..."; <STDIN>;

           print << 'HINTS_2';

               If you submit a bug report here are some pointers.

               1.  Put "Excel::Writer::XLSX:" at the beginning of the subject line.
                   This helps to filter genuine messages from spam.

               2.  Describe the problems as clearly and as concisely as possible.

               3.  Send a sample program. It is often easier to describe a problem in
                   code than in written prose.

               4.  The sample program should be as small as possible to demonstrate the
                   problem. Don't copy and past large sections of your program. The
                   program should also be self contained and working.

               A sample bug report is generated below. If you use this format then it
               will help to analyse your question and respond to it more quickly.

               Please don't send patches without contacting the author first.

           HINTS_2
           print "Press enter ..."; <STDIN>;

           print << 'EMAIL';

           =======================================================================

           To:      John McNamara <jmcnamara@cpan.org>
           Subject: Excel::Writer::XLSX: Problem with something.

           Hi John,

           I am using Excel::Writer::XLSX and I have encountered a problem. I
           want it to do SOMETHING but the module appears to do SOMETHING_ELSE.

           Here is some code that demonstrates the problem.

               #!/usr/bin/perl -w

               use strict;
               use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

               my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new("reload.xls");
               my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();

               $worksheet->write(0, 0, "Hi Excel!");

               $workbook->close();

               __END__

           My automatically generated system details are as follows:
           EMAIL

           print "\n    Perl version   : $]";
           print "\n    OS name        : $^O";
           print "\n    Module versions: (not all are required)\n";

           my @modules = qw(
                             Excel::Writer::XLSX
                             Spreadsheet::WriteExcel
                             Archive::Zip
                             XML::Writer
                             IO::File
                             File::Temp
                           );

           for my $module (@modules) {
               my $version;
               eval "require $module";

               if (not $@) {
                   $version = $module->VERSION;
                   $version = '(unknown)' if not defined $version;
               }
               else {
                   $version = '(not installed)';
               }

               printf "%21s%-24s\t%s\n", "", $module, $version;
           }

           print << "BYE";
           Yours etc.,

           A. Person
           --

           BYE

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/bug_report.pl>

   Example: demo.pl
       A simple demo of some of the features of Excel::Writer::XLSX.

       This program is used to create the project screenshot for Freshmeat:
       <http://freshmeat.net/projects/writeexcel/>

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl -w

           #######################################################################
           #
           # A simple demo of some of the features of Excel::Writer::XLSX.
           #
           # This program is used to create the project screenshot for Freshmeat:
           # L<http://freshmeat.net/projects/writeexcel/>
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), October 2001, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook   = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'demo.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet  = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'Demo' );
           my $worksheet2 = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'Another sheet' );
           my $worksheet3 = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'And another' );

           my $bold = $workbook->add_format( bold => 1 );

           #######################################################################
           #
           # Write a general heading
           #
           $worksheet->set_column( 'A:A', 36, $bold );
           $worksheet->set_column( 'B:B', 20 );
           $worksheet->set_row( 0, 40 );

           my $heading = $workbook->add_format(
               bold  => 1,
               color => 'blue',
               size  => 16,
               merge => 1,
               align => 'vcenter',
           );

           my @headings = ( 'Features of Excel::Writer::XLSX', '' );
           $worksheet->write_row( 'A1', \@headings, $heading );

           #######################################################################
           #
           # Some text examples
           #
           my $text_format = $workbook->add_format(
               bold   => 1,
               italic => 1,
               color  => 'red',
               size   => 18,
               font   => 'Lucida Calligraphy'
           );

           $worksheet->write( 'A2', "Text" );
           $worksheet->write( 'B2', "Hello Excel" );
           $worksheet->write( 'A3', "Formatted text" );
           $worksheet->write( 'B3', "Hello Excel", $text_format );
           $worksheet->write( 'A4', "Unicode text" );
           $worksheet->write( 'B4', "\x{0410} \x{0411} \x{0412} \x{0413} \x{0414}" );

           #######################################################################
           #
           # Some numeric examples
           #
           my $num1_format = $workbook->add_format( num_format => '$#,##0.00' );
           my $num2_format = $workbook->add_format( num_format => ' d mmmm yyy' );

           $worksheet->write( 'A5', "Numbers" );
           $worksheet->write( 'B5', 1234.56 );
           $worksheet->write( 'A6', "Formatted numbers" );
           $worksheet->write( 'B6', 1234.56, $num1_format );
           $worksheet->write( 'A7', "Formatted numbers" );
           $worksheet->write( 'B7', 37257, $num2_format );

           #######################################################################
           #
           # Formulae
           #
           $worksheet->set_selection( 'B8' );
           $worksheet->write( 'A8', 'Formulas and functions, "=SIN(PI()/4)"' );
           $worksheet->write( 'B8', '=SIN(PI()/4)' );

           #######################################################################
           #
           # Hyperlinks
           #
           $worksheet->write( 'A9', "Hyperlinks" );
           $worksheet->write( 'B9', 'http://www.perl.com/' );

           #######################################################################
           #
           # Images
           #
           $worksheet->write( 'A10', "Images" );
           $worksheet->insert_image( 'B10', 'republic.png', 16, 8 );

           #######################################################################
           #
           # Misc
           #
           $worksheet->write( 'A18', "Page/printer setup" );
           $worksheet->write( 'A19', "Multiple worksheets" );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/demo.pl>

   Example: formats.pl
       Examples of formatting using the Excel::Writer::XLSX module.

       This program demonstrates almost all possible formatting options. It is worth running this
       program and viewing the output Excel file if you are interested in the various formatting
       possibilities.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl -w

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Examples of formatting using the Excel::Writer::XLSX module.
           #
           # This program demonstrates almost all possible formatting options. It is worth
           # running this program and viewing the output Excel file if you are interested
           # in the various formatting possibilities.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), September 2002, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'formats.xlsx' );

           # Some common formats
           my $center = $workbook->add_format( align => 'center' );
           my $heading = $workbook->add_format( align => 'center', bold => 1 );

           # The named colors
           my %colors = (
               0x08, 'black',
               0x0C, 'blue',
               0x10, 'brown',
               0x0F, 'cyan',
               0x17, 'gray',
               0x11, 'green',
               0x0B, 'lime',
               0x0E, 'magenta',
               0x12, 'navy',
               0x35, 'orange',
               0x21, 'pink',
               0x14, 'purple',
               0x0A, 'red',
               0x16, 'silver',
               0x09, 'white',
               0x0D, 'yellow',

           );

           # Call these subroutines to demonstrate different formatting options
           intro();
           fonts();
           named_colors();
           standard_colors();
           numeric_formats();
           borders();
           patterns();
           alignment();
           misc();

           # Note: this is required
           $workbook->close();

           ######################################################################
           #
           # Intro.
           #
           sub intro {

               my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'Introduction' );

               $worksheet->set_column( 0, 0, 60 );

               my $format = $workbook->add_format();
               $format->set_bold();
               $format->set_size( 14 );
               $format->set_color( 'blue' );
               $format->set_align( 'center' );

               my $format2 = $workbook->add_format();
               $format2->set_bold();
               $format2->set_color( 'blue' );

               my $format3 = $workbook->add_format(
                   color     => 'blue',
                   underline => 1,
               );

               $worksheet->write( 2, 0, 'This workbook demonstrates some of', $format );
               $worksheet->write( 3, 0, 'the formatting options provided by', $format );
               $worksheet->write( 4, 0, 'the Excel::Writer::XLSX module.',    $format );
               $worksheet->write( 'A7', 'Sections:', $format2 );

               $worksheet->write( 'A8', "internal:Fonts!A1", 'Fonts', $format3 );

               $worksheet->write( 'A9', "internal:'Named colors'!A1",
                   'Named colors', $format3 );

               $worksheet->write(
                   'A10',
                   "internal:'Standard colors'!A1",
                   'Standard colors', $format3
               );

               $worksheet->write(
                   'A11',
                   "internal:'Numeric formats'!A1",
                   'Numeric formats', $format3
               );

               $worksheet->write( 'A12', "internal:Borders!A1", 'Borders', $format3 );
               $worksheet->write( 'A13', "internal:Patterns!A1", 'Patterns', $format3 );
               $worksheet->write( 'A14', "internal:Alignment!A1", 'Alignment', $format3 );
               $worksheet->write( 'A15', "internal:Miscellaneous!A1", 'Miscellaneous',
                   $format3 );

           }

           ######################################################################
           #
           # Demonstrate the named colors.
           #
           sub named_colors {

               my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'Named colors' );

               $worksheet->set_column( 0, 3, 15 );

               $worksheet->write( 0, 0, "Index", $heading );
               $worksheet->write( 0, 1, "Index", $heading );
               $worksheet->write( 0, 2, "Name",  $heading );
               $worksheet->write( 0, 3, "Color", $heading );

               my $i = 1;

               while ( my ( $index, $color ) = each %colors ) {
                   my $format = $workbook->add_format(
                       bg_color => $color,
                       pattern  => 1,
                       border   => 1
                   );

                   $worksheet->write( $i + 1, 0, $index, $center );
                   $worksheet->write( $i + 1, 1, sprintf( "0x%02X", $index ), $center );
                   $worksheet->write( $i + 1, 2, $color, $center );
                   $worksheet->write( $i + 1, 3, '',     $format );
                   $i++;
               }
           }

           ######################################################################
           #
           # Demonstrate the standard Excel colors in the range 8..63.
           #
           sub standard_colors {

               my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'Standard colors' );

               $worksheet->set_column( 0, 3, 15 );

               $worksheet->write( 0, 0, "Index", $heading );
               $worksheet->write( 0, 1, "Index", $heading );
               $worksheet->write( 0, 2, "Color", $heading );
               $worksheet->write( 0, 3, "Name",  $heading );

               for my $i ( 8 .. 63 ) {
                   my $format = $workbook->add_format(
                       bg_color => $i,
                       pattern  => 1,
                       border   => 1
                   );

                   $worksheet->write( ( $i - 7 ), 0, $i, $center );
                   $worksheet->write( ( $i - 7 ), 1, sprintf( "0x%02X", $i ), $center );
                   $worksheet->write( ( $i - 7 ), 2, '', $format );

                   # Add the  color names
                   if ( exists $colors{$i} ) {
                       $worksheet->write( ( $i - 7 ), 3, $colors{$i}, $center );

                   }
               }
           }

           ######################################################################
           #
           # Demonstrate the standard numeric formats.
           #
           sub numeric_formats {

               my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'Numeric formats' );

               $worksheet->set_column( 0, 4, 15 );
               $worksheet->set_column( 5, 5, 45 );

               $worksheet->write( 0, 0, "Index",       $heading );
               $worksheet->write( 0, 1, "Index",       $heading );
               $worksheet->write( 0, 2, "Unformatted", $heading );
               $worksheet->write( 0, 3, "Formatted",   $heading );
               $worksheet->write( 0, 4, "Negative",    $heading );
               $worksheet->write( 0, 5, "Format",      $heading );

               #<<<
               my @formats;
               push @formats, [ 0x00, 1234.567,   0,         'General' ];
               push @formats, [ 0x01, 1234.567,   0,         '0' ];
               push @formats, [ 0x02, 1234.567,   0,         '0.00' ];
               push @formats, [ 0x03, 1234.567,   0,         '#,##0' ];
               push @formats, [ 0x04, 1234.567,   0,         '#,##0.00' ];
               push @formats, [ 0x05, 1234.567,   -1234.567, '($#,##0_);($#,##0)' ];
               push @formats, [ 0x06, 1234.567,   -1234.567, '($#,##0_);[Red]($#,##0)' ];
               push @formats, [ 0x07, 1234.567,   -1234.567, '($#,##0.00_);($#,##0.00)' ];
               push @formats, [ 0x08, 1234.567,   -1234.567, '($#,##0.00_);[Red]($#,##0.00)' ];
               push @formats, [ 0x09, 0.567,      0,         '0%' ];
               push @formats, [ 0x0a, 0.567,      0,         '0.00%' ];
               push @formats, [ 0x0b, 1234.567,   0,         '0.00E+00' ];
               push @formats, [ 0x0c, 0.75,       0,         '# ?/?' ];
               push @formats, [ 0x0d, 0.3125,     0,         '# ??/??' ];
               push @formats, [ 0x0e, 36892.521,  0,         'm/d/yy' ];
               push @formats, [ 0x0f, 36892.521,  0,         'd-mmm-yy' ];
               push @formats, [ 0x10, 36892.521,  0,         'd-mmm' ];
               push @formats, [ 0x11, 36892.521,  0,         'mmm-yy' ];
               push @formats, [ 0x12, 36892.521,  0,         'h:mm AM/PM' ];
               push @formats, [ 0x13, 36892.521,  0,         'h:mm:ss AM/PM' ];
               push @formats, [ 0x14, 36892.521,  0,         'h:mm' ];
               push @formats, [ 0x15, 36892.521,  0,         'h:mm:ss' ];
               push @formats, [ 0x16, 36892.521,  0,         'm/d/yy h:mm' ];
               push @formats, [ 0x25, 1234.567,   -1234.567, '(#,##0_);(#,##0)' ];
               push @formats, [ 0x26, 1234.567,   -1234.567, '(#,##0_);[Red](#,##0)' ];
               push @formats, [ 0x27, 1234.567,   -1234.567, '(#,##0.00_);(#,##0.00)' ];
               push @formats, [ 0x28, 1234.567,   -1234.567, '(#,##0.00_);[Red](#,##0.00)' ];
               push @formats, [ 0x29, 1234.567,   -1234.567, '_(* #,##0_);_(* (#,##0);_(* "-"_);_(@_)' ];
               push @formats, [ 0x2a, 1234.567,   -1234.567, '_($* #,##0_);_($* (#,##0);_($* "-"_);_(@_)' ];
               push @formats, [ 0x2b, 1234.567,   -1234.567, '_(* #,##0.00_);_(* (#,##0.00);_(* "-"??_);_(@_)' ];
               push @formats, [ 0x2c, 1234.567,   -1234.567, '_($* #,##0.00_);_($* (#,##0.00);_($* "-"??_);_(@_)' ];
               push @formats, [ 0x2d, 36892.521,  0,         'mm:ss' ];
               push @formats, [ 0x2e, 3.0153,     0,         '[h]:mm:ss' ];
               push @formats, [ 0x2f, 36892.521,  0,         'mm:ss.0' ];
               push @formats, [ 0x30, 1234.567,   0,         '##0.0E+0' ];
               push @formats, [ 0x31, 1234.567,   0,         '@' ];
               #>>>

               my $i;
               foreach my $format ( @formats ) {
                   my $style = $workbook->add_format();
                   $style->set_num_format( $format->[0] );

                   $i++;
                   $worksheet->write( $i, 0, $format->[0], $center );
                   $worksheet->write( $i, 1, sprintf( "0x%02X", $format->[0] ), $center );
                   $worksheet->write( $i, 2, $format->[1], $center );
                   $worksheet->write( $i, 3, $format->[1], $style );

                   if ( $format->[2] ) {
                       $worksheet->write( $i, 4, $format->[2], $style );
                   }

                   $worksheet->write_string( $i, 5, $format->[3] );
               }
           }

           ######################################################################
           #
           # Demonstrate the font options.
           #
           sub fonts {

               my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'Fonts' );

               $worksheet->set_column( 0, 0, 30 );
               $worksheet->set_column( 1, 1, 10 );

               $worksheet->write( 0, 0, "Font name", $heading );
               $worksheet->write( 0, 1, "Font size", $heading );

               my @fonts;
               push @fonts, [ 10, 'Arial' ];
               push @fonts, [ 12, 'Arial' ];
               push @fonts, [ 14, 'Arial' ];
               push @fonts, [ 12, 'Arial Black' ];
               push @fonts, [ 12, 'Arial Narrow' ];
               push @fonts, [ 12, 'Century Schoolbook' ];
               push @fonts, [ 12, 'Courier' ];
               push @fonts, [ 12, 'Courier New' ];
               push @fonts, [ 12, 'Garamond' ];
               push @fonts, [ 12, 'Impact' ];
               push @fonts, [ 12, 'Lucida Handwriting' ];
               push @fonts, [ 12, 'Times New Roman' ];
               push @fonts, [ 12, 'Symbol' ];
               push @fonts, [ 12, 'Wingdings' ];
               push @fonts, [ 12, 'A font that doesn\'t exist' ];

               my $i;
               foreach my $font ( @fonts ) {
                   my $format = $workbook->add_format();

                   $format->set_size( $font->[0] );
                   $format->set_font( $font->[1] );

                   $i++;
                   $worksheet->write( $i, 0, $font->[1], $format );
                   $worksheet->write( $i, 1, $font->[0], $format );
               }

           }

           ######################################################################
           #
           # Demonstrate the standard Excel border styles.
           #
           sub borders {

               my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'Borders' );

               $worksheet->set_column( 0, 4, 10 );
               $worksheet->set_column( 5, 5, 40 );

               $worksheet->write( 0, 0, "Index",                                $heading );
               $worksheet->write( 0, 1, "Index",                                $heading );
               $worksheet->write( 0, 3, "Style",                                $heading );
               $worksheet->write( 0, 5, "The style is highlighted in red for ", $heading );
               $worksheet->write( 1, 5, "emphasis, the default color is black.",
                   $heading );

               for my $i ( 0 .. 13 ) {
                   my $format = $workbook->add_format();
                   $format->set_border( $i );
                   $format->set_border_color( 'red' );
                   $format->set_align( 'center' );

                   $worksheet->write( ( 2 * ( $i + 1 ) ), 0, $i, $center );
                   $worksheet->write( ( 2 * ( $i + 1 ) ),
                       1, sprintf( "0x%02X", $i ), $center );

                   $worksheet->write( ( 2 * ( $i + 1 ) ), 3, "Border", $format );
               }

               $worksheet->write( 30, 0, "Diag type",             $heading );
               $worksheet->write( 30, 1, "Index",                 $heading );
               $worksheet->write( 30, 3, "Style",                 $heading );
               $worksheet->write( 30, 5, "Diagonal Boder styles", $heading );

               for my $i ( 1 .. 3 ) {
                   my $format = $workbook->add_format();
                   $format->set_diag_type( $i );
                   $format->set_diag_border( 1 );
                   $format->set_diag_color( 'red' );
                   $format->set_align( 'center' );

                   $worksheet->write( ( 2 * ( $i + 15 ) ), 0, $i, $center );
                   $worksheet->write( ( 2 * ( $i + 15 ) ),
                       1, sprintf( "0x%02X", $i ), $center );

                   $worksheet->write( ( 2 * ( $i + 15 ) ), 3, "Border", $format );
               }
           }

           ######################################################################
           #
           # Demonstrate the standard Excel cell patterns.
           #
           sub patterns {

               my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'Patterns' );

               $worksheet->set_column( 0, 4, 10 );
               $worksheet->set_column( 5, 5, 50 );

               $worksheet->write( 0, 0, "Index",   $heading );
               $worksheet->write( 0, 1, "Index",   $heading );
               $worksheet->write( 0, 3, "Pattern", $heading );

               $worksheet->write( 0, 5, "The background colour has been set to silver.",
                   $heading );
               $worksheet->write( 1, 5, "The foreground colour has been set to green.",
                   $heading );

               for my $i ( 0 .. 18 ) {
                   my $format = $workbook->add_format();

                   $format->set_pattern( $i );
                   $format->set_bg_color( 'silver' );
                   $format->set_fg_color( 'green' );
                   $format->set_align( 'center' );

                   $worksheet->write( ( 2 * ( $i + 1 ) ), 0, $i, $center );
                   $worksheet->write( ( 2 * ( $i + 1 ) ),
                       1, sprintf( "0x%02X", $i ), $center );

                   $worksheet->write( ( 2 * ( $i + 1 ) ), 3, "Pattern", $format );

                   if ( $i == 1 ) {
                       $worksheet->write( ( 2 * ( $i + 1 ) ),
                           5, "This is solid colour, the most useful pattern.", $heading );
                   }
               }
           }

           ######################################################################
           #
           # Demonstrate the standard Excel cell alignments.
           #
           sub alignment {

               my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'Alignment' );

               $worksheet->set_column( 0, 7, 12 );
               $worksheet->set_row( 0, 40 );
               $worksheet->set_selection( 7, 0 );

               my $format01 = $workbook->add_format();
               my $format02 = $workbook->add_format();
               my $format03 = $workbook->add_format();
               my $format04 = $workbook->add_format();
               my $format05 = $workbook->add_format();
               my $format06 = $workbook->add_format();
               my $format07 = $workbook->add_format();
               my $format08 = $workbook->add_format();
               my $format09 = $workbook->add_format();
               my $format10 = $workbook->add_format();
               my $format11 = $workbook->add_format();
               my $format12 = $workbook->add_format();
               my $format13 = $workbook->add_format();
               my $format14 = $workbook->add_format();
               my $format15 = $workbook->add_format();
               my $format16 = $workbook->add_format();
               my $format17 = $workbook->add_format();

               $format02->set_align( 'top' );
               $format03->set_align( 'bottom' );
               $format04->set_align( 'vcenter' );
               $format05->set_align( 'vjustify' );
               $format06->set_text_wrap();

               $format07->set_align( 'left' );
               $format08->set_align( 'right' );
               $format09->set_align( 'center' );
               $format10->set_align( 'fill' );
               $format11->set_align( 'justify' );
               $format12->set_merge();

               $format13->set_rotation( 45 );
               $format14->set_rotation( -45 );
               $format15->set_rotation( 270 );

               $format16->set_shrink();
               $format17->set_indent( 1 );

               $worksheet->write( 0, 0, 'Vertical',   $heading );
               $worksheet->write( 0, 1, 'top',        $format02 );
               $worksheet->write( 0, 2, 'bottom',     $format03 );
               $worksheet->write( 0, 3, 'vcenter',    $format04 );
               $worksheet->write( 0, 4, 'vjustify',   $format05 );
               $worksheet->write( 0, 5, "text\nwrap", $format06 );

               $worksheet->write( 2, 0, 'Horizontal', $heading );
               $worksheet->write( 2, 1, 'left',       $format07 );
               $worksheet->write( 2, 2, 'right',      $format08 );
               $worksheet->write( 2, 3, 'center',     $format09 );
               $worksheet->write( 2, 4, 'fill',       $format10 );
               $worksheet->write( 2, 5, 'justify',    $format11 );

               $worksheet->write( 3, 1, 'merge', $format12 );
               $worksheet->write( 3, 2, '',      $format12 );

               $worksheet->write( 3, 3, 'Shrink ' x 3, $format16 );
               $worksheet->write( 3, 4, 'Indent',      $format17 );

               $worksheet->write( 5, 0, 'Rotation',   $heading );
               $worksheet->write( 5, 1, 'Rotate 45',  $format13 );
               $worksheet->write( 6, 1, 'Rotate -45', $format14 );
               $worksheet->write( 7, 1, 'Rotate 270', $format15 );
           }

           ######################################################################
           #
           # Demonstrate other miscellaneous features.
           #
           sub misc {

               my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'Miscellaneous' );

               $worksheet->set_column( 2, 2, 25 );

               my $format01 = $workbook->add_format();
               my $format02 = $workbook->add_format();
               my $format03 = $workbook->add_format();
               my $format04 = $workbook->add_format();
               my $format05 = $workbook->add_format();
               my $format06 = $workbook->add_format();
               my $format07 = $workbook->add_format();

               $format01->set_underline( 0x01 );
               $format02->set_underline( 0x02 );
               $format03->set_underline( 0x21 );
               $format04->set_underline( 0x22 );
               $format05->set_font_strikeout();
               $format06->set_font_outline();
               $format07->set_font_shadow();

               $worksheet->write( 1,  2, 'Underline  0x01',          $format01 );
               $worksheet->write( 3,  2, 'Underline  0x02',          $format02 );
               $worksheet->write( 5,  2, 'Underline  0x21',          $format03 );
               $worksheet->write( 7,  2, 'Underline  0x22',          $format04 );
               $worksheet->write( 9,  2, 'Strikeout',                $format05 );
               $worksheet->write( 11, 2, 'Outline (Macintosh only)', $format06 );
               $worksheet->write( 13, 2, 'Shadow (Macintosh only)',  $format07 );
           }

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/formats.pl>

   Example: regions.pl
       An example of how to use the Excel::Writer::XLSX module to write a basic Excel workbook
       with multiple worksheets.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl -w

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # An example of how to use the Excel::Writer::XLSX module to write a basic
           # Excel workbook with multiple worksheets.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), March 2001, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           # Create a new Excel workbook
           my $workbook = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'regions.xlsx' );

           # Add some worksheets
           my $north = $workbook->add_worksheet( "North" );
           my $south = $workbook->add_worksheet( "South" );
           my $east  = $workbook->add_worksheet( "East" );
           my $west  = $workbook->add_worksheet( "West" );

           # Add a Format
           my $format = $workbook->add_format();
           $format->set_bold();
           $format->set_color( 'blue' );

           # Add a caption to each worksheet
           foreach my $worksheet ( $workbook->sheets() ) {
               $worksheet->write( 0, 0, "Sales", $format );
           }

           # Write some data
           $north->write( 0, 1, 200000 );
           $south->write( 0, 1, 100000 );
           $east->write( 0, 1, 150000 );
           $west->write( 0, 1, 100000 );

           # Set the active worksheet
           $south->activate();

           # Set the width of the first column
           $south->set_column( 0, 0, 20 );

           # Set the active cell
           $south->set_selection( 0, 1 );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/regions.pl>

   Example: stats.pl
       A simple example of how to use functions with the Excel::Writer::XLSX module.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl -w

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # A simple example of how to use functions with the Excel::Writer::XLSX
           # module.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), March 2001, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           # Create a new workbook and add a worksheet
           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'stats.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'Test data' );

           # Set the column width for columns 1
           $worksheet->set_column( 0, 0, 20 );

           # Create a format for the headings
           my $format = $workbook->add_format();
           $format->set_bold();

           # Write the sample data
           $worksheet->write( 0, 0, 'Sample', $format );
           $worksheet->write( 0, 1, 1 );
           $worksheet->write( 0, 2, 2 );
           $worksheet->write( 0, 3, 3 );
           $worksheet->write( 0, 4, 4 );
           $worksheet->write( 0, 5, 5 );
           $worksheet->write( 0, 6, 6 );
           $worksheet->write( 0, 7, 7 );
           $worksheet->write( 0, 8, 8 );

           $worksheet->write( 1, 0, 'Length', $format );
           $worksheet->write( 1, 1, 25.4 );
           $worksheet->write( 1, 2, 25.4 );
           $worksheet->write( 1, 3, 24.8 );
           $worksheet->write( 1, 4, 25.0 );
           $worksheet->write( 1, 5, 25.3 );
           $worksheet->write( 1, 6, 24.9 );
           $worksheet->write( 1, 7, 25.2 );
           $worksheet->write( 1, 8, 24.8 );

           # Write some statistical functions
           $worksheet->write( 4, 0, 'Count', $format );
           $worksheet->write( 4, 1, '=COUNT(B1:I1)' );

           $worksheet->write( 5, 0, 'Sum', $format );
           $worksheet->write( 5, 1, '=SUM(B2:I2)' );

           $worksheet->write( 6, 0, 'Average', $format );
           $worksheet->write( 6, 1, '=AVERAGE(B2:I2)' );

           $worksheet->write( 7, 0, 'Min', $format );
           $worksheet->write( 7, 1, '=MIN(B2:I2)' );

           $worksheet->write( 8, 0, 'Max', $format );
           $worksheet->write( 8, 1, '=MAX(B2:I2)' );

           $worksheet->write( 9, 0, 'Standard Deviation', $format );
           $worksheet->write( 9, 1, '=STDEV(B2:I2)' );

           $worksheet->write( 10, 0, 'Kurtosis', $format );
           $worksheet->write( 10, 1, '=KURT(B2:I2)' );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/stats.pl>

   Example: autofilter.pl
       An example of how to create autofilters with Excel::Writer::XLSX.

       An autofilter is a way of adding drop down lists to the headers of a 2D range of worksheet
       data. This allows users to filter the data based on simple criteria so that some data is
       shown and some is hidden.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # An example of how to create autofilters with Excel::Writer::XLSX.
           #
           # An autofilter is a way of adding drop down lists to the headers of a 2D range
           # of worksheet data. This allows users to filter the data based on
           # simple criteria so that some data is shown and some is hidden.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), September 2007, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'autofilter.xlsx' );

           my $worksheet1 = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $worksheet2 = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $worksheet3 = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $worksheet4 = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $worksheet5 = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $worksheet6 = $workbook->add_worksheet();

           my $bold = $workbook->add_format( bold => 1 );

           # Extract the data embedded at the end of this file.
           my @headings = split ' ', <DATA>;
           my @data;
           push @data, [split] while <DATA>;

           # Set up several sheets with the same data.
           for my $worksheet ( $workbook->sheets() ) {
               $worksheet->set_column( 'A:D', 12 );
               $worksheet->set_row( 0, 20, $bold );
               $worksheet->write( 'A1', \@headings );
           }

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 1. Autofilter without conditions.
           #

           $worksheet1->autofilter( 'A1:D51' );
           $worksheet1->write( 'A2', [ [@data] ] );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           #
           # Example 2. Autofilter with a filter condition in the first column.
           #

           # The range in this example is the same as above but in row-column notation.
           $worksheet2->autofilter( 0, 0, 50, 3 );

           # The placeholder "Region" in the filter is ignored and can be any string
           # that adds clarity to the expression.
           #
           $worksheet2->filter_column( 0, 'Region eq East' );

           #
           # Hide the rows that don't match the filter criteria.
           #
           my $row = 1;

           for my $row_data ( @data ) {
               my $region = $row_data->[0];

               if ( $region eq 'East' ) {

                   # Row is visible.
               }
               else {

                   # Hide row.
                   $worksheet2->set_row( $row, undef, undef, 1 );
               }

               $worksheet2->write( $row++, 0, $row_data );
           }

           ###############################################################################
           #
           #
           # Example 3. Autofilter with a dual filter condition in one of the columns.
           #

           $worksheet3->autofilter( 'A1:D51' );

           $worksheet3->filter_column( 'A', 'x eq East or x eq South' );

           #
           # Hide the rows that don't match the filter criteria.
           #
           $row = 1;

           for my $row_data ( @data ) {
               my $region = $row_data->[0];

               if ( $region eq 'East' or $region eq 'South' ) {

                   # Row is visible.
               }
               else {

                   # Hide row.
                   $worksheet3->set_row( $row, undef, undef, 1 );
               }

               $worksheet3->write( $row++, 0, $row_data );
           }

           ###############################################################################
           #
           #
           # Example 4. Autofilter with filter conditions in two columns.
           #

           $worksheet4->autofilter( 'A1:D51' );

           $worksheet4->filter_column( 'A', 'x eq East' );
           $worksheet4->filter_column( 'C', 'x > 3000 and x < 8000' );

           #
           # Hide the rows that don't match the filter criteria.
           #
           $row = 1;

           for my $row_data ( @data ) {
               my $region = $row_data->[0];
               my $volume = $row_data->[2];

               if (    $region eq 'East'
                   and $volume > 3000
                   and $volume < 8000 )
               {

                   # Row is visible.
               }
               else {

                   # Hide row.
                   $worksheet4->set_row( $row, undef, undef, 1 );
               }

               $worksheet4->write( $row++, 0, $row_data );
           }

           ###############################################################################
           #
           #
           # Example 5. Autofilter with filter for blanks.
           #

           # Create a blank cell in our test data.
           $data[5]->[0] = '';

           $worksheet5->autofilter( 'A1:D51' );
           $worksheet5->filter_column( 'A', 'x == Blanks' );

           #
           # Hide the rows that don't match the filter criteria.
           #
           $row = 1;

           for my $row_data ( @data ) {
               my $region = $row_data->[0];

               if ( $region eq '' ) {

                   # Row is visible.
               }
               else {

                   # Hide row.
                   $worksheet5->set_row( $row, undef, undef, 1 );
               }

               $worksheet5->write( $row++, 0, $row_data );
           }

           ###############################################################################
           #
           #
           # Example 6. Autofilter with filter for non-blanks.
           #

           $worksheet6->autofilter( 'A1:D51' );
           $worksheet6->filter_column( 'A', 'x == NonBlanks' );

           #
           # Hide the rows that don't match the filter criteria.
           #
           $row = 1;

           for my $row_data ( @data ) {
               my $region = $row_data->[0];

               if ( $region ne '' ) {

                   # Row is visible.
               }
               else {

                   # Hide row.
                   $worksheet6->set_row( $row, undef, undef, 1 );
               }

               $worksheet6->write( $row++, 0, $row_data );
           }

           $workbook->close();

           __DATA__
           Region    Item      Volume    Month
           East      Apple     9000      July
           East      Apple     5000      July
           South     Orange    9000      September
           North     Apple     2000      November
           West      Apple     9000      November
           South     Pear      7000      October
           North     Pear      9000      August
           West      Orange    1000      December
           West      Grape     1000      November
           South     Pear      10000     April
           West      Grape     6000      January
           South     Orange    3000      May
           North     Apple     3000      December
           South     Apple     7000      February
           West      Grape     1000      December
           East      Grape     8000      February
           South     Grape     10000     June
           West      Pear      7000      December
           South     Apple     2000      October
           East      Grape     7000      December
           North     Grape     6000      April
           East      Pear      8000      February
           North     Apple     7000      August
           North     Orange    7000      July
           North     Apple     6000      June
           South     Grape     8000      September
           West      Apple     3000      October
           South     Orange    10000     November
           West      Grape     4000      July
           North     Orange    5000      August
           East      Orange    1000      November
           East      Orange    4000      October
           North     Grape     5000      August
           East      Apple     1000      December
           South     Apple     10000     March
           East      Grape     7000      October
           West      Grape     1000      September
           East      Grape     10000     October
           South     Orange    8000      March
           North     Apple     4000      July
           South     Orange    5000      July
           West      Apple     4000      June
           East      Apple     5000      April
           North     Pear      3000      August
           East      Grape     9000      November
           North     Orange    8000      October
           East      Apple     10000     June
           South     Pear      1000      December
           North     Grape     10000     July
           East      Grape     6000      February

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/autofilter.pl>

   Example: array_formula.pl
       Example of how to use the Excel::Writer::XLSX module to write simple array formulas.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           #######################################################################
           #
           # Example of how to use the Excel::Writer::XLSX module to write simple
           # array formulas.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), August 2004, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           # Create a new workbook and add a worksheet
           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'array_formula.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();

           # Write some test data.
           $worksheet->write( 'B1', [ [ 500, 10 ], [ 300, 15 ] ] );
           $worksheet->write( 'B5', [ [ 1, 2, 3 ], [ 20234, 21003, 10000 ] ] );

           # Write an array formula that returns a single value
           $worksheet->write( 'A1', '{=SUM(B1:C1*B2:C2)}' );

           # Same as above but more verbose.
           $worksheet->write_array_formula( 'A2:A2', '{=SUM(B1:C1*B2:C2)}' );

           # Write an array formula that returns a range of values
           $worksheet->write_array_formula( 'A5:A7', '{=TREND(C5:C7,B5:B7)}' );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/array_formula.pl>

   Example: cgi.pl
       Example of how to use the Excel::Writer::XLSX module to send an Excel file to a browser in
       a CGI program.

       On Windows the hash-bang line should be something like:

           #!C:\Perl\bin\perl.exe

       The "Content-Disposition" line will cause a prompt to be generated to save the file. If
       you want to stream the file to the browser instead, comment out that line as shown below.

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example of how to use the Excel::Writer::XLSX module to send an Excel
           # file to a browser in a CGI program.
           #
           # On Windows the hash-bang line should be something like:
           #
           #     #!C:\Perl\bin\perl.exe
           #
           # The "Content-Disposition" line will cause a prompt to be generated to save
           # the file. If you want to stream the file to the browser instead, comment out
           # that line as shown below.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), March 2001, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           # Set the filename and send the content type
           my $filename = "cgitest.xlsx";

           print "Content-type: application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet\n";

           # The Content-Disposition will generate a prompt to save the file. If you want
           # to stream the file to the browser, comment out the following line.
           print "Content-Disposition: attachment; filename=$filename\n";
           print "\n";

           # Redirect the output to STDOUT. Binmode the filehandle in case it is needed.
           binmode STDOUT;

           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( \*STDOUT );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();

           # Set the column width for column 1
           $worksheet->set_column( 0, 0, 20 );

           # Create a format
           my $format = $workbook->add_format();
           $format->set_bold();
           $format->set_size( 15 );
           $format->set_color( 'blue' );

           # Write to the workbook
           $worksheet->write( 0, 0, "Hi Excel!", $format );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/cgi.pl>

   Example: chart_area.pl
       A demo of an Area chart in Excel::Writer::XLSX.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           #######################################################################
           #
           # A demo of an Area chart in Excel::Writer::XLSX.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), March 2011, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'chart_area.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $bold      = $workbook->add_format( bold => 1 );

           # Add the worksheet data that the charts will refer to.
           my $headings = [ 'Number', 'Batch 1', 'Batch 2' ];
           my $data = [
               [ 2,  3,  4,  5,  6,  7 ],
               [ 40, 40, 50, 30, 25, 50 ],
               [ 30, 25, 30, 10, 5,  10 ],

           ];

           $worksheet->write( 'A1', $headings, $bold );
           $worksheet->write( 'A2', $data );

           # Create a new chart object. In this case an embedded chart.
           my $chart1 = $workbook->add_chart( type => 'area', embedded => 1 );

           # Configure the first series.
           $chart1->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$B$1',
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$7',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$B$2:$B$7',
           );

           # Configure second series. Note alternative use of array ref to define
           # ranges: [ $sheetname, $row_start, $row_end, $col_start, $col_end ].
           $chart1->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$C$1',
               categories => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 6, 0, 0 ],
               values     => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 6, 2, 2 ],
           );

           # Add a chart title and some axis labels.
           $chart1->set_title ( name => 'Results of sample analysis' );
           $chart1->set_x_axis( name => 'Test number' );
           $chart1->set_y_axis( name => 'Sample length (mm)' );

           # Set an Excel chart style. Blue colors with white outline and shadow.
           $chart1->set_style( 11 );

           # Insert the chart into the worksheet (with an offset).
           $worksheet->insert_chart( 'D2', $chart1, 25, 10 );

           #
           # Create a stacked chart sub-type
           #
           my $chart2 = $workbook->add_chart(
               type     => 'area',
               embedded => 1,
               subtype  => 'stacked'
           );

           # Configure the first series.
           $chart2->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$B$1',
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$7',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$B$2:$B$7',
           );

           # Configure second series.
           $chart2->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$C$1',
               categories => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 6, 0, 0 ],
               values     => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 6, 2, 2 ],
           );

           # Add a chart title and some axis labels.
           $chart2->set_title ( name => 'Stacked Chart' );
           $chart2->set_x_axis( name => 'Test number' );
           $chart2->set_y_axis( name => 'Sample length (mm)' );

           # Set an Excel chart style. Blue colors with white outline and shadow.
           $chart2->set_style( 12 );

           # Insert the chart into the worksheet (with an offset).
           $worksheet->insert_chart( 'D18', $chart2, 25, 11 );

           #
           # Create a percent stacked chart sub-type
           #
           my $chart3 = $workbook->add_chart(
               type     => 'area',
               embedded => 1,
               subtype  => 'percent_stacked'
           );

           # Configure the first series.
           $chart3->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$B$1',
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$7',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$B$2:$B$7',
           );

           # Configure second series.
           $chart3->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$C$1',
               categories => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 6, 0, 0 ],
               values     => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 6, 2, 2 ],
           );

           # Add a chart title and some axis labels.
           $chart3->set_title ( name => 'Percent Stacked Chart' );
           $chart3->set_x_axis( name => 'Test number' );
           $chart3->set_y_axis( name => 'Sample length (mm)' );

           # Set an Excel chart style. Blue colors with white outline and shadow.
           $chart3->set_style( 13 );

           # Insert the chart into the worksheet (with an offset).
           $worksheet->insert_chart( 'D34', $chart3, 25, 11 );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/chart_area.pl>

   Example: chart_bar.pl
       A demo of an Bar chart in Excel::Writer::XLSX.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           #######################################################################
           #
           # A demo of an Bar chart in Excel::Writer::XLSX.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), March 2011, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'chart_bar.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $bold      = $workbook->add_format( bold => 1 );

           # Add the worksheet data that the charts will refer to.
           my $headings = [ 'Number', 'Batch 1', 'Batch 2' ];
           my $data = [
               [ 2,  3,  4,  5,  6,  7 ],
               [ 10, 40, 50, 20, 10, 50 ],
               [ 30, 60, 70, 50, 40, 30 ],

           ];

           $worksheet->write( 'A1', $headings, $bold );
           $worksheet->write( 'A2', $data );

           # Create a new chart object. In this case an embedded chart.
           my $chart1 = $workbook->add_chart( type => 'bar', embedded => 1 );

           # Configure the first series.
           $chart1->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$B$1',
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$7',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$B$2:$B$7',
           );

           # Configure second series. Note alternative use of array ref to define
           # ranges: [ $sheetname, $row_start, $row_end, $col_start, $col_end ].
           $chart1->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$C$1',
               categories => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 6, 0, 0 ],
               values     => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 6, 2, 2 ],
           );

           # Add a chart title and some axis labels.
           $chart1->set_title ( name => 'Results of sample analysis' );
           $chart1->set_x_axis( name => 'Test number' );
           $chart1->set_y_axis( name => 'Sample length (mm)' );

           # Set an Excel chart style. Blue colors with white outline and shadow.
           $chart1->set_style( 11 );

           # Insert the chart into the worksheet (with an offset).
           $worksheet->insert_chart( 'D2', $chart1, 25, 10 );

           #
           # Create a stacked chart sub-type
           #
           my $chart2 = $workbook->add_chart(
               type     => 'bar',
               embedded => 1,
               subtype  => 'stacked'
           );

           # Configure the first series.
           $chart2->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$B$1',
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$7',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$B$2:$B$7',
           );

           # Configure second series.
           $chart2->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$C$1',
               categories => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 6, 0, 0 ],
               values     => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 6, 2, 2 ],
           );

           # Add a chart title and some axis labels.
           $chart2->set_title ( name => 'Stacked Chart' );
           $chart2->set_x_axis( name => 'Test number' );
           $chart2->set_y_axis( name => 'Sample length (mm)' );

           # Set an Excel chart style. Blue colors with white outline and shadow.
           $chart2->set_style( 12 );

           # Insert the chart into the worksheet (with an offset).
           $worksheet->insert_chart( 'D18', $chart2, 25, 11 );

           #
           # Create a percent stacked chart sub-type
           #
           my $chart3 = $workbook->add_chart(
               type     => 'bar',
               embedded => 1,
               subtype  => 'percent_stacked'
           );

           # Configure the first series.
           $chart3->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$B$1',
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$7',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$B$2:$B$7',
           );

           # Configure second series.
           $chart3->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$C$1',
               categories => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 6, 0, 0 ],
               values     => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 6, 2, 2 ],
           );

           # Add a chart title and some axis labels.
           $chart3->set_title ( name => 'Percent Stacked Chart' );
           $chart3->set_x_axis( name => 'Test number' );
           $chart3->set_y_axis( name => 'Sample length (mm)' );

           # Set an Excel chart style. Blue colors with white outline and shadow.
           $chart3->set_style( 13 );

           # Insert the chart into the worksheet (with an offset).
           $worksheet->insert_chart( 'D34', $chart3, 25, 11 );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/chart_bar.pl>

   Example: chart_column.pl
       A demo of a Column chart in Excel::Writer::XLSX.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           #######################################################################
           #
           # A demo of a Column chart in Excel::Writer::XLSX.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), March 2011, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'chart_column.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $bold      = $workbook->add_format( bold => 1 );

           # Add the worksheet data that the charts will refer to.
           my $headings = [ 'Number', 'Batch 1', 'Batch 2' ];
           my $data = [
               [ 2,  3,  4,  5,  6,  7 ],
               [ 10, 40, 50, 20, 10, 50 ],
               [ 30, 60, 70, 50, 40, 30 ],

           ];

           $worksheet->write( 'A1', $headings, $bold );
           $worksheet->write( 'A2', $data );

           # Create a new chart object. In this case an embedded chart.
           my $chart1 = $workbook->add_chart( type => 'column', embedded => 1 );

           # Configure the first series.
           $chart1->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$B$1',
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$7',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$B$2:$B$7',
           );

           # Configure second series. Note alternative use of array ref to define
           # ranges: [ $sheetname, $row_start, $row_end, $col_start, $col_end ].
           $chart1->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$C$1',
               categories => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 6, 0, 0 ],
               values     => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 6, 2, 2 ],
           );

           # Add a chart title and some axis labels.
           $chart1->set_title ( name => 'Results of sample analysis' );
           $chart1->set_x_axis( name => 'Test number' );
           $chart1->set_y_axis( name => 'Sample length (mm)' );

           # Set an Excel chart style. Blue colors with white outline and shadow.
           $chart1->set_style( 11 );

           # Insert the chart into the worksheet (with an offset).
           $worksheet->insert_chart( 'D2', $chart1, 25, 10 );

           #
           # Create a stacked chart sub-type
           #
           my $chart2 = $workbook->add_chart(
               type     => 'column',
               embedded => 1,
               subtype  => 'stacked'
           );

           # Configure the first series.
           $chart2->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$B$1',
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$7',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$B$2:$B$7',
           );

           # Configure second series.
           $chart2->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$C$1',
               categories => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 6, 0, 0 ],
               values     => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 6, 2, 2 ],
           );

           # Add a chart title and some axis labels.
           $chart2->set_title ( name => 'Stacked Chart' );
           $chart2->set_x_axis( name => 'Test number' );
           $chart2->set_y_axis( name => 'Sample length (mm)' );

           # Set an Excel chart style. Blue colors with white outline and shadow.
           $chart2->set_style( 12 );

           # Insert the chart into the worksheet (with an offset).
           $worksheet->insert_chart( 'D18', $chart2, 25, 11 );

           #
           # Create a percent stacked chart sub-type
           #
           my $chart3 = $workbook->add_chart(
               type     => 'column',
               embedded => 1,
               subtype  => 'percent_stacked'
           );

           # Configure the first series.
           $chart3->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$B$1',
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$7',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$B$2:$B$7',
           );

           # Configure second series.
           $chart3->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$C$1',
               categories => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 6, 0, 0 ],
               values     => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 6, 2, 2 ],
           );

           # Add a chart title and some axis labels.
           $chart3->set_title ( name => 'Percent Stacked Chart' );
           $chart3->set_x_axis( name => 'Test number' );
           $chart3->set_y_axis( name => 'Sample length (mm)' );

           # Set an Excel chart style. Blue colors with white outline and shadow.
           $chart3->set_style( 13 );

           # Insert the chart into the worksheet (with an offset).
           $worksheet->insert_chart( 'D34', $chart3, 25, 11 );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/chart_column.pl>

   Example: chart_line.pl
       A demo of a Line chart in Excel::Writer::XLSX.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           #######################################################################
           #
           # A demo of a Line chart in Excel::Writer::XLSX.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), March 2011, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'chart_line.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $bold      = $workbook->add_format( bold => 1 );

           # Add the worksheet data that the charts will refer to.
           my $headings = [ 'Number', 'Batch 1', 'Batch 2' ];
           my $data = [
               [ 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 ],
               [ 10, 40, 50, 20, 10, 50 ],
               [ 30, 60, 70, 50, 40, 30 ],

           ];

           $worksheet->write( 'A1', $headings, $bold );
           $worksheet->write( 'A2', $data );

           # Create a new chart object. In this case an embedded chart.
           my $chart = $workbook->add_chart( type => 'line', embedded => 1 );

           # Configure the first series.
           $chart->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$B$1',
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$7',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$B$2:$B$7',
           );

           # Configure second series. Note alternative use of array ref to define
           # ranges: [ $sheetname, $row_start, $row_end, $col_start, $col_end ].
           $chart->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$C$1',
               categories => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 6, 0, 0 ],
               values     => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 6, 2, 2 ],
           );

           # Add a chart title and some axis labels.
           $chart->set_title ( name => 'Results of sample analysis' );
           $chart->set_x_axis( name => 'Test number' );
           $chart->set_y_axis( name => 'Sample length (mm)' );

           # Set an Excel chart style. Colors with white outline and shadow.
           $chart->set_style( 10 );

           # Insert the chart into the worksheet (with an offset).
           $worksheet->insert_chart( 'D2', $chart, 25, 10 );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/chart_line.pl>

   Example: chart_pie.pl
       A demo of a Pie chart in Excel::Writer::XLSX.

       The demo also shows how to set segment colours. It is possible to define chart colors for
       most types of Excel::Writer::XLSX charts via the add_series() method. However, Pie and
       Doughtnut charts are a special case since each segment is represented as a point so it is
       necessary to assign formatting to each point in the series.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           #######################################################################
           #
           # A demo of a Pie chart in Excel::Writer::XLSX.
           #
           # The demo also shows how to set segment colours. It is possible to define
           # chart colors for most types of Excel::Writer::XLSX charts via the
           # add_series() method. However, Pie and Doughtnut charts are a special case
           # since each segment is represented as a point so it is necessary to assign
           # formatting to each point in the series.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), March 2011, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'chart_pie.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $bold      = $workbook->add_format( bold => 1 );

           # Add the worksheet data that the charts will refer to.
           my $headings = [ 'Category', 'Values' ];
           my $data = [
               [ 'Apple', 'Cherry', 'Pecan' ],
               [ 60,       30,       10     ],
           ];

           $worksheet->write( 'A1', $headings, $bold );
           $worksheet->write( 'A2', $data );

           # Create a new chart object. In this case an embedded chart.
           my $chart1 = $workbook->add_chart( type => 'pie', embedded => 1 );

           # Configure the series. Note the use of the array ref to define ranges:
           # [ $sheetname, $row_start, $row_end, $col_start, $col_end ].
           # See below for an alternative syntax.
           $chart1->add_series(
               name       => 'Pie sales data',
               categories => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 3, 0, 0 ],
               values     => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 3, 1, 1 ],
           );

           # Add a title.
           $chart1->set_title( name => 'Popular Pie Types' );

           # Set an Excel chart style. Colors with white outline and shadow.
           $chart1->set_style( 10 );

           # Insert the chart into the worksheet (with an offset).
           $worksheet->insert_chart( 'C2', $chart1, 25, 10 );

           #
           # Create a Pie chart with user defined segment colors.
           #

           # Create an example Pie chart like above.
           my $chart2 = $workbook->add_chart( type => 'pie', embedded => 1 );

           # Configure the series and add user defined segment colours.
           $chart2->add_series(
               name       => 'Pie sales data',
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$4',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$B$2:$B$4',
               points     => [
                   { fill => { color => '#5ABA10' } },
                   { fill => { color => '#FE110E' } },
                   { fill => { color => '#CA5C05' } },
               ],
           );

           # Add a title.
           $chart2->set_title( name => 'Pie Chart with user defined colors' );

           # Insert the chart into the worksheet (with an offset).
           $worksheet->insert_chart( 'C18', $chart2, 25, 10 );

           #
           # Create a Pie chart with rotation of the segments.
           #

           # Create an example Pie chart like above.
           my $chart3 = $workbook->add_chart( type => 'pie', embedded => 1 );

           # Configure the series.
           $chart3->add_series(
               name       => 'Pie sales data',
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$4',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$B$2:$B$4',
           );

           # Add a title.
           $chart3->set_title( name => 'Pie Chart with segment rotation' );

           # Change the angle/rotation of the first segment.
           $chart3->set_rotation(90);

           # Insert the chart into the worksheet (with an offset).
           $worksheet->insert_chart( 'C34', $chart3, 25, 10 );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/chart_pie.pl>

   Example: chart_doughnut.pl
       A demo of a Doughnut chart in Excel::Writer::XLSX.

       The demo also shows how to set segment colours. It is possible to define chart colors for
       most types of Excel::Writer::XLSX charts via the add_series() method. However, Pie and
       Doughtnut charts are a special case since each segment is represented as a point so it is
       necessary to assign formatting to each point in the series.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           #######################################################################
           #
           # A demo of a Doughnut chart in Excel::Writer::XLSX.
           #
           # The demo also shows how to set segment colours. It is possible to define
           # chart colors for most types of Excel::Writer::XLSX charts via the
           # add_series() method. However, Pie and Doughtnut charts are a special case
           # since each segment is represented as a point so it is necessary to assign
           # formatting to each point in the series.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), March 2011, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'chart_doughnut.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $bold      = $workbook->add_format( bold => 1 );

           # Add the worksheet data that the charts will refer to.
           my $headings = [ 'Category', 'Values' ];
           my $data = [
               [ 'Glazed', 'Chocolate', 'Cream' ],
               [ 50,       35,          15      ],
           ];

           $worksheet->write( 'A1', $headings, $bold );
           $worksheet->write( 'A2', $data );

           # Create a new chart object. In this case an embedded chart.
           my $chart1 = $workbook->add_chart( type => 'doughnut', embedded => 1 );

           # Configure the series. Note the use of the array ref to define ranges:
           # [ $sheetname, $row_start, $row_end, $col_start, $col_end ].
           # See below for an alternative syntax.
           $chart1->add_series(
               name       => 'Doughnut sales data',
               categories => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 3, 0, 0 ],
               values     => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 3, 1, 1 ],
           );

           # Add a title.
           $chart1->set_title( name => 'Popular Doughnut Types' );

           # Set an Excel chart style. Colors with white outline and shadow.
           $chart1->set_style( 10 );

           # Insert the chart into the worksheet (with an offset).
           $worksheet->insert_chart( 'C2', $chart1, 25, 10 );

           #
           # Create a Doughnut chart with user defined segment colors.
           #

           # Create an example Doughnut chart like above.
           my $chart2 = $workbook->add_chart( type => 'doughnut', embedded => 1 );

           # Configure the series and add user defined segment colours.
           $chart2->add_series(
               name       => 'Doughnut sales data',
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$4',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$B$2:$B$4',
               points     => [
                   { fill => { color => '#FA58D0' } },
                   { fill => { color => '#61210B' } },
                   { fill => { color => '#F5F6CE' } },
               ],
           );

           # Add a title.
           $chart2->set_title( name => 'Doughnut Chart with user defined colors' );

           # Insert the chart into the worksheet (with an offset).
           $worksheet->insert_chart( 'C18', $chart2, 25, 10 );

           #
           # Create a Doughnut chart with rotation of the segments.
           #

           # Create an example Doughnut chart like above.
           my $chart3 = $workbook->add_chart( type => 'doughnut', embedded => 1 );

           # Configure the series.
           $chart3->add_series(
               name       => 'Doughnut sales data',
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$4',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$B$2:$B$4',
           );

           # Add a title.
           $chart3->set_title( name => 'Doughnut Chart with segment rotation' );

           # Change the angle/rotation of the first segment.
           $chart3->set_rotation(90);

           # Insert the chart into the worksheet (with an offset).
           $worksheet->insert_chart( 'C34', $chart3, 25, 10 );

           #
           # Create a Doughnut chart with user defined hole size.
           #

           # Create an example Doughnut chart like above.
           my $chart4 = $workbook->add_chart( type => 'doughnut', embedded => 1 );

           # Configure the series.
           $chart4->add_series(
               name       => 'Doughnut sales data',
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$4',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$B$2:$B$4',
           );

           # Add a title.
           $chart4->set_title( name => 'Doughnut Chart with user defined hole size' );

           # Change the hole size.
           $chart4->set_hole_size(33);

           # Insert the chart into the worksheet (with an offset).
           $worksheet->insert_chart( 'C50', $chart4, 25, 10 );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/chart_doughnut.pl>

   Example: chart_radar.pl
       A demo of an Radar chart in Excel::Writer::XLSX.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           #######################################################################
           #
           # A demo of an Radar chart in Excel::Writer::XLSX.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), October 2012, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'chart_radar.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $bold      = $workbook->add_format( bold => 1 );

           # Add the worksheet data that the charts will refer to.
           my $headings = [ 'Number', 'Batch 1', 'Batch 2' ];
           my $data = [
               [ 2,  3,  4,  5,  6,  7 ],
               [ 30, 60, 70, 50, 40, 30 ],
               [ 25, 40, 50, 30, 50, 40 ],

           ];

           $worksheet->write( 'A1', $headings, $bold );
           $worksheet->write( 'A2', $data );

           # Create a new chart object. In this case an embedded chart.
           my $chart1 = $workbook->add_chart( type => 'radar', embedded => 1 );

           # Configure the first series.
           $chart1->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$B$1',
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$7',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$B$2:$B$7',
           );

           # Configure second series. Note alternative use of array ref to define
           # ranges: [ $sheetname, $row_start, $row_end, $col_start, $col_end ].
           $chart1->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$C$1',
               categories => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 6, 0, 0 ],
               values     => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 6, 2, 2 ],
           );

           # Add a chart title and some axis labels.
           $chart1->set_title ( name => 'Results of sample analysis' );
           $chart1->set_x_axis( name => 'Test number' );
           $chart1->set_y_axis( name => 'Sample length (mm)' );

           # Set an Excel chart style. Blue colors with white outline and shadow.
           $chart1->set_style( 11 );

           # Insert the chart into the worksheet (with an offset).
           $worksheet->insert_chart( 'D2', $chart1, 25, 10 );

           #
           # Create a with_markers chart sub-type
           #
           my $chart2 = $workbook->add_chart(
               type     => 'radar',
               embedded => 1,
               subtype  => 'with_markers'
           );

           # Configure the first series.
           $chart2->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$B$1',
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$7',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$B$2:$B$7',
           );

           # Configure second series.
           $chart2->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$C$1',
               categories => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 6, 0, 0 ],
               values     => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 6, 2, 2 ],
           );

           # Add a chart title and some axis labels.
           $chart2->set_title ( name => 'Stacked Chart' );
           $chart2->set_x_axis( name => 'Test number' );
           $chart2->set_y_axis( name => 'Sample length (mm)' );

           # Set an Excel chart style. Blue colors with white outline and shadow.
           $chart2->set_style( 12 );

           # Insert the chart into the worksheet (with an offset).
           $worksheet->insert_chart( 'D18', $chart2, 25, 11 );

           #
           # Create a filled chart sub-type
           #
           my $chart3 = $workbook->add_chart(
               type     => 'radar',
               embedded => 1,
               subtype  => 'filled'
           );

           # Configure the first series.
           $chart3->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$B$1',
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$7',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$B$2:$B$7',
           );

           # Configure second series.
           $chart3->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$C$1',
               categories => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 6, 0, 0 ],
               values     => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 6, 2, 2 ],
           );

           # Add a chart title and some axis labels.
           $chart3->set_title ( name => 'Percent Stacked Chart' );
           $chart3->set_x_axis( name => 'Test number' );
           $chart3->set_y_axis( name => 'Sample length (mm)' );

           # Set an Excel chart style. Blue colors with white outline and shadow.
           $chart3->set_style( 13 );

           # Insert the chart into the worksheet (with an offset).
           $worksheet->insert_chart( 'D34', $chart3, 25, 11 );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/chart_radar.pl>

   Example: chart_scatter.pl
       A demo of a Scatter chart in Excel::Writer::XLSX. Other subtypes are also supported such
       as markers_only (the default), straight_with_markers, straight, smooth_with_markers and
       smooth. See the main documentation for more details.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           #######################################################################
           #
           # A demo of a Scatter chart in Excel::Writer::XLSX. Other subtypes are
           # also supported such as markers_only (the default), straight_with_markers,
           # straight, smooth_with_markers and smooth. See the main documentation for
           # more details.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), March 2011, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'chart_scatter.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $bold      = $workbook->add_format( bold => 1 );

           # Add the worksheet data that the charts will refer to.
           my $headings = [ 'Number', 'Batch 1', 'Batch 2' ];
           my $data = [
               [ 2,  3,  4,  5,  6,  7 ],
               [ 10, 40, 50, 20, 10, 50 ],
               [ 30, 60, 70, 50, 40, 30 ],

           ];

           $worksheet->write( 'A1', $headings, $bold );
           $worksheet->write( 'A2', $data );

           # Create a new chart object. In this case an embedded chart.
           my $chart1 = $workbook->add_chart( type => 'scatter', embedded => 1 );

           # Configure the first series.
           $chart1->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$B$1',
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$7',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$B$2:$B$7',
           );

           # Configure second series. Note alternative use of array ref to define
           # ranges: [ $sheetname, $row_start, $row_end, $col_start, $col_end ].
           $chart1->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$C$1',
               categories => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 6, 0, 0 ],
               values     => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 6, 2, 2 ],
           );

           # Add a chart title and some axis labels.
           $chart1->set_title ( name => 'Results of sample analysis' );
           $chart1->set_x_axis( name => 'Test number' );
           $chart1->set_y_axis( name => 'Sample length (mm)' );

           # Set an Excel chart style. Blue colors with white outline and shadow.
           $chart1->set_style( 11 );

           # Insert the chart into the worksheet (with an offset).
           $worksheet->insert_chart( 'D2', $chart1, 25, 10 );

           #
           # Create a scatter chart sub-type with straight lines and markers.
           #
           my $chart2 = $workbook->add_chart(
               type     => 'scatter',
               embedded => 1,
               subtype  => 'straight_with_markers'
           );

           # Configure the first series.
           $chart2->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$B$1',
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$7',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$B$2:$B$7',
           );

           # Configure second series.
           $chart2->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$C$1',
               categories => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 6, 0, 0 ],
               values     => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 6, 2, 2 ],
           );

           # Add a chart title and some axis labels.
           $chart2->set_title ( name => 'Straight line with markers' );
           $chart2->set_x_axis( name => 'Test number' );
           $chart2->set_y_axis( name => 'Sample length (mm)' );

           # Set an Excel chart style. Blue colors with white outline and shadow.
           $chart2->set_style( 12 );

           # Insert the chart into the worksheet (with an offset).
           $worksheet->insert_chart( 'D18', $chart2, 25, 11 );

           #
           # Create a scatter chart sub-type with straight lines and no markers.
           #
           my $chart3 = $workbook->add_chart(
               type     => 'scatter',
               embedded => 1,
               subtype  => 'straight'
           );

           # Configure the first series.
           $chart3->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$B$1',
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$7',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$B$2:$B$7',
           );

           # Configure second series.
           $chart3->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$C$1',
               categories => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 6, 0, 0 ],
               values     => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 6, 2, 2 ],
           );

           # Add a chart title and some axis labels.
           $chart3->set_title ( name => 'Straight line' );
           $chart3->set_x_axis( name => 'Test number' );
           $chart3->set_y_axis( name => 'Sample length (mm)' );

           # Set an Excel chart style. Blue colors with white outline and shadow.
           $chart3->set_style( 13 );

           # Insert the chart into the worksheet (with an offset).
           $worksheet->insert_chart( 'D34', $chart3, 25, 11 );

           #
           # Create a scatter chart sub-type with smooth lines and markers.
           #
           my $chart4 = $workbook->add_chart(
               type     => 'scatter',
               embedded => 1,
               subtype  => 'smooth_with_markers'
           );

           # Configure the first series.
           $chart4->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$B$1',
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$7',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$B$2:$B$7',
           );

           # Configure second series.
           $chart4->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$C$1',
               categories => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 6, 0, 0 ],
               values     => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 6, 2, 2 ],
           );

           # Add a chart title and some axis labels.
           $chart4->set_title ( name => 'Smooth line with markers' );
           $chart4->set_x_axis( name => 'Test number' );
           $chart4->set_y_axis( name => 'Sample length (mm)' );

           # Set an Excel chart style. Blue colors with white outline and shadow.
           $chart4->set_style( 14 );

           # Insert the chart into the worksheet (with an offset).
           $worksheet->insert_chart( 'D51', $chart4, 25, 11 );

           #
           # Create a scatter chart sub-type with smooth lines and no markers.
           #
           my $chart5 = $workbook->add_chart(
               type     => 'scatter',
               embedded => 1,
               subtype  => 'smooth'
           );

           # Configure the first series.
           $chart5->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$B$1',
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$7',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$B$2:$B$7',
           );

           # Configure second series.
           $chart5->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$C$1',
               categories => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 6, 0, 0 ],
               values     => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 6, 2, 2 ],
           );

           # Add a chart title and some axis labels.
           $chart5->set_title ( name => 'Smooth line' );
           $chart5->set_x_axis( name => 'Test number' );
           $chart5->set_y_axis( name => 'Sample length (mm)' );

           # Set an Excel chart style. Blue colors with white outline and shadow.
           $chart5->set_style( 15 );

           # Insert the chart into the worksheet (with an offset).
           $worksheet->insert_chart( 'D66', $chart5, 25, 11 );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/chart_scatter.pl>

   Example: chart_secondary_axis.pl
       A demo of a Line chart with a secondary axis in Excel::Writer::XLSX.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           #######################################################################
           #
           # A demo of a Line chart with a secondary axis in Excel::Writer::XLSX.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), March 2011, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'chart_secondary_axis.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $bold      = $workbook->add_format( bold => 1 );

           # Add the worksheet data that the charts will refer to.
           my $headings = [ 'Aliens', 'Humans', ];
           my $data = [
               [ 2,  3,  4,  5,  6,  7 ],
               [ 10, 40, 50, 20, 10, 50 ],

           ];

           $worksheet->write( 'A1', $headings, $bold );
           $worksheet->write( 'A2', $data );

           # Create a new chart object. In this case an embedded chart.
           my $chart = $workbook->add_chart( type => 'line', embedded => 1 );

           # Configure a series with a secondary axis
           $chart->add_series(
               name    => '=Sheet1!$A$1',
               values  => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$7',
               y2_axis => 1,
           );

           $chart->add_series(
               name   => '=Sheet1!$B$1',
               values => '=Sheet1!$B$2:$B$7',
           );

           $chart->set_legend( position => 'right' );

           # Add a chart title and some axis labels.
           $chart->set_title( name => 'Survey results' );
           $chart->set_x_axis( name => 'Days', );
           $chart->set_y_axis( name => 'Population', major_gridlines => { visible => 0 } );
           $chart->set_y2_axis( name => 'Laser wounds' );

           # Insert the chart into the worksheet (with an offset).
           $worksheet->insert_chart( 'D2', $chart, 25, 10 );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/chart_secondary_axis.pl>

   Example: chart_combined.pl
       An example of a Combined chart in Excel::Writer::XLSX.

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           #######################################################################
           #
           # An example of a Combined chart in Excel::Writer::XLSX.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), March 2015, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'chart_combined.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $bold      = $workbook->add_format( bold => 1 );

           # Add the worksheet data that the charts will refer to.
           my $headings = [ 'Number', 'Batch 1', 'Batch 2' ];
           my $data = [
               [ 2,  3,  4,  5,  6,  7 ],
               [ 10, 40, 50, 20, 10, 50 ],
               [ 30, 60, 70, 50, 40, 30 ],

           ];

           $worksheet->write( 'A1', $headings, $bold );
           $worksheet->write( 'A2', $data );

           #
           # In the first example we will create a combined column and line chart.
           # They will share the same X and Y axes.
           #

           # Create a new column chart. This will use this as the primary chart.
           my $column_chart1 = $workbook->add_chart( type => 'column', embedded => 1 );

           # Configure the data series for the primary chart.
           $column_chart1->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$B$1',
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$7',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$B$2:$B$7',
           );

           # Create a new column chart. This will use this as the secondary chart.
           my $line_chart1 = $workbook->add_chart( type => 'line', embedded => 1 );

           # Configure the data series for the secondary chart.
           $line_chart1->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$C$1',
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$7',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$C$2:$C$7',
           );

           # Combine the charts.
           $column_chart1->combine( $line_chart1 );

           # Add a chart title and some axis labels. Note, this is done via the
           # primary chart.
           $column_chart1->set_title( name => 'Combined chart - same Y axis' );
           $column_chart1->set_x_axis( name => 'Test number' );
           $column_chart1->set_y_axis( name => 'Sample length (mm)' );

           # Insert the chart into the worksheet
           $worksheet->insert_chart( 'E2', $column_chart1 );

           #
           # In the second example we will create a similar combined column and line
           # chart except that the secondary chart will have a secondary Y axis.
           #

           # Create a new column chart. This will use this as the primary chart.
           my $column_chart2 = $workbook->add_chart( type => 'column', embedded => 1 );

           # Configure the data series for the primary chart.
           $column_chart2->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$B$1',
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$7',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$B$2:$B$7',
           );

           # Create a new column chart. This will use this as the secondary chart.
           my $line_chart2 = $workbook->add_chart( type => 'line', embedded => 1 );

           # Configure the data series for the secondary chart. We also set a
           # secondary Y axis via (y2_axis). This is the only difference between
           # this and the first example, apart from the axis label below.
           $line_chart2->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$C$1',
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$7',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$C$2:$C$7',
               y2_axis    => 1,
           );

           # Combine the charts.
           $column_chart2->combine( $line_chart2 );

           # Add a chart title and some axis labels.
           $column_chart2->set_title(  name => 'Combine chart - secondary Y axis' );
           $column_chart2->set_x_axis( name => 'Test number' );
           $column_chart2->set_y_axis( name => 'Sample length (mm)' );

           # Note: the y2 properites are on the secondary chart.
           $line_chart2->set_y2_axis( name => 'Target length (mm)' );

           # Insert the chart into the worksheet
           $worksheet->insert_chart( 'E18', $column_chart2 );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/chart_combined.pl>

   Example: chart_pareto.pl
       A demo of a Pareto chart in Excel::Writer::XLSX.

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           #######################################################################
           #
           # A demo of a Pareto chart in Excel::Writer::XLSX.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), March 2015, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'chart_pareto.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();

           # Formats used in the workbook.
           my $bold           = $workbook->add_format( bold       => 1 );
           my $percent_format = $workbook->add_format( num_format => '0.0%' );

           # Widen the columns for visibility.
           $worksheet->set_column( 'A:A', 15 );
           $worksheet->set_column( 'B:C', 10 );

           # Add the worksheet data that the charts will refer to.
           my $headings = [ 'Reason', 'Number', 'Percentage' ];

           my $reasons = [
               'Traffic',   'Child care', 'Public Transport', 'Weather',
               'Overslept', 'Emergency',
           ];

           my $numbers  = [ 60,   40,    20,  15,  10,    5 ];
           my $percents = [ 0.44, 0.667, 0.8, 0.9, 0.967, 1 ];

           $worksheet->write_row( 'A1', $headings, $bold );
           $worksheet->write_col( 'A2', $reasons );
           $worksheet->write_col( 'B2', $numbers );
           $worksheet->write_col( 'C2', $percents, $percent_format );

           # Create a new column chart. This will be the primary chart.
           my $column_chart = $workbook->add_chart( type => 'column', embedded => 1 );

           # Add a series.
           $column_chart->add_series(
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$7',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$B$2:$B$7',
           );

           # Add a chart title.
           $column_chart->set_title( name => 'Reasons for lateness' );

           # Turn off the chart legend.
           $column_chart->set_legend( position => 'none' );

           # Set the title and scale of the Y axes. Note, the secondary axis is set from
           # the primary chart.
           $column_chart->set_y_axis(
               name => 'Respondents (number)',
               min  => 0,
               max  => 120
           );
           $column_chart->set_y2_axis( max => 1 );

           # Create a new line chart. This will be the secondary chart.
           my $line_chart = $workbook->add_chart( type => 'line', embedded => 1 );

           # Add a series, on the secondary axis.
           $line_chart->add_series(
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$7',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$C$2:$C$7',
               marker     => { type => 'automatic' },
               y2_axis    => 1,
           );

           # Combine the charts.
           $column_chart->combine( $line_chart );

           # Insert the chart into the worksheet.
           $worksheet->insert_chart( 'F2', $column_chart );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/chart_pareto.pl>

   Example: chart_stock.pl
       A demo of a Stock chart in Excel::Writer::XLSX.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           #######################################################################
           #
           # A demo of a Stock chart in Excel::Writer::XLSX.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), March 2011, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook    = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'chart_stock.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet   = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $bold        = $workbook->add_format( bold => 1 );
           my $date_format = $workbook->add_format( num_format => 'dd/mm/yyyy' );
           my $chart       = $workbook->add_chart( type => 'stock', embedded => 1 );

           # Add the worksheet data that the charts will refer to.
           my $headings = [ 'Date', 'High', 'Low', 'Close' ];
           my $data = [

               [ '2007-01-01T', '2007-01-02T', '2007-01-03T', '2007-01-04T', '2007-01-05T' ],
               [ 27.2,  25.03, 19.05, 20.34, 18.5 ],
               [ 23.49, 19.55, 15.12, 17.84, 16.34 ],
               [ 25.45, 23.05, 17.32, 20.45, 17.34 ],

           ];

           $worksheet->write( 'A1', $headings, $bold );

           for my $row ( 0 .. 4 ) {
               $worksheet->write_date_time( $row+1, 0, $data->[0]->[$row], $date_format );
               $worksheet->write( $row+1, 1, $data->[1]->[$row] );
               $worksheet->write( $row+1, 2, $data->[2]->[$row] );
               $worksheet->write( $row+1, 3, $data->[3]->[$row] );

           }

           $worksheet->set_column( 'A:D', 11 );

           # Add a series for each of the High-Low-Close columns.
           $chart->add_series(
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$6',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$B$2:$B$6',
           );

           $chart->add_series(
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$6',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$C$2:$C$6',
           );

           $chart->add_series(
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$6',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$D$2:$D$6',
           );

           # Add a chart title and some axis labels.
           $chart->set_title ( name => 'High-Low-Close', );
           $chart->set_x_axis( name => 'Date', );
           $chart->set_y_axis( name => 'Share price', );

           $worksheet->insert_chart( 'E9', $chart );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/chart_stock.pl>

   Example: chart_data_table.pl
       A demo of an Column chart with a data table on the X-axis using Excel::Writer::XLSX.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           #######################################################################
           #
           # A demo of an Column chart with a data table on the X-axis using
           # Excel::Writer::XLSX.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), December 2012, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'chart_data_table.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $bold      = $workbook->add_format( bold => 1 );

           # Add the worksheet data that the charts will refer to.
           my $headings = [ 'Number', 'Batch 1', 'Batch 2' ];
           my $data = [
               [ 2,  3,  4,  5,  6,  7 ],
               [ 10, 40, 50, 20, 10, 50 ],
               [ 30, 60, 70, 50, 40, 30 ],

           ];

           $worksheet->write( 'A1', $headings, $bold );
           $worksheet->write( 'A2', $data );

           # Create a column chart with a data table.
           my $chart1 = $workbook->add_chart( type => 'column', embedded => 1 );

           # Configure the first series.
           $chart1->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$B$1',
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$7',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$B$2:$B$7',
           );

           # Configure second series. Note alternative use of array ref to define
           # ranges: [ $sheetname, $row_start, $row_end, $col_start, $col_end ].
           $chart1->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$C$1',
               categories => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 6, 0, 0 ],
               values     => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 6, 2, 2 ],
           );

           # Add a chart title and some axis labels.
           $chart1->set_title( name => 'Chart with Data Table' );
           $chart1->set_x_axis( name => 'Test number' );
           $chart1->set_y_axis( name => 'Sample length (mm)' );

           # Set a default data table on the X-Axis.
           $chart1->set_table();

           # Insert the chart into the worksheet (with an offset).
           $worksheet->insert_chart( 'D2', $chart1, 25, 10 );

           #
           # Create a second chart.
           #
           my $chart2 = $workbook->add_chart( type => 'column', embedded => 1 );

           # Configure the first series.
           $chart2->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$B$1',
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$7',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$B$2:$B$7',
           );

           # Configure second series.
           $chart2->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$C$1',
               categories => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 6, 0, 0 ],
               values     => [ 'Sheet1', 1, 6, 2, 2 ],
           );

           # Add a chart title and some axis labels.
           $chart2->set_title( name => 'Data Table with legend keys' );
           $chart2->set_x_axis( name => 'Test number' );
           $chart2->set_y_axis( name => 'Sample length (mm)' );

           # Set a data table on the X-Axis with the legend keys showm.
           $chart2->set_table( show_keys => 1 );

           # Hide the chart legend since the keys are show on the data table.
           $chart2->set_legend( position => 'none' );

           # Insert the chart into the worksheet (with an offset).
           $worksheet->insert_chart( 'D18', $chart2, 25, 11 );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/chart_data_table.pl>

   Example: chart_data_tools.pl
       A demo of an various Excel chart data tools that are available via an Excel::Writer::XLSX
       chart.

       These include, Trendlines, Data Labels, Error Bars, Drop Lines, High-Low Lines and Up-Down
       Bars.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           #######################################################################
           #
           # A demo of an various Excel chart data tools that are available via
           # an Excel::Writer::XLSX chart.
           #
           # These include, Trendlines, Data Labels, Error Bars, Drop Lines,
           # High-Low Lines and Up-Down Bars.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), December 2012, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'chart_data_tools.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $bold      = $workbook->add_format( bold => 1 );

           # Add the worksheet data that the charts will refer to.
           my $headings = [ 'Number', 'Data 1', 'Data 2' ];
           my $data = [
               [ 2,  3,  4,  5,  6,  7 ],
               [ 10, 40, 50, 20, 10, 50 ],
               [ 30, 60, 70, 50, 40, 30 ],

           ];

           $worksheet->write( 'A1', $headings, $bold );
           $worksheet->write( 'A2', $data );

           #######################################################################
           #
           # Trendline example.
           #

           # Create a Line chart.
           my $chart1 = $workbook->add_chart( type => 'line', embedded => 1 );

           # Configure the first series with a polynomial trendline.
           $chart1->add_series(
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$7',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$B$2:$B$7',
               trendline  => {
                   type  => 'polynomial',
                   order => 3,
               },
           );

           # Configure the second series with a moving average trendline.
           $chart1->add_series(
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$7',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$C$2:$C$7',
               trendline  => { type => 'linear' },
           );

           # Add a chart title. and some axis labels.
           $chart1->set_title( name => 'Chart with Trendlines' );

           # Insert the chart into the worksheet (with an offset).
           $worksheet->insert_chart( 'D2', $chart1, 25, 10 );

           #######################################################################
           #
           # Data Labels and Markers example.
           #

           # Create a Line chart.
           my $chart2 = $workbook->add_chart( type => 'line', embedded => 1 );

           # Configure the first series.
           $chart2->add_series(
               categories  => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$7',
               values      => '=Sheet1!$B$2:$B$7',
               data_labels => { value => 1 },
               marker      => { type => 'automatic' },
           );

           # Configure the second series.
           $chart2->add_series(
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$7',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$C$2:$C$7',
           );

           # Add a chart title. and some axis labels.
           $chart2->set_title( name => 'Chart with Data Labels and Markers' );

           # Insert the chart into the worksheet (with an offset).
           $worksheet->insert_chart( 'D18', $chart2, 25, 10 );

           #######################################################################
           #
           # Error Bars example.
           #

           # Create a Line chart.
           my $chart3 = $workbook->add_chart( type => 'line', embedded => 1 );

           # Configure the first series.
           $chart3->add_series(
               categories   => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$7',
               values       => '=Sheet1!$B$2:$B$7',
               y_error_bars => { type => 'standard_error' },
           );

           # Configure the second series.
           $chart3->add_series(
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$7',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$C$2:$C$7',
           );

           # Add a chart title. and some axis labels.
           $chart3->set_title( name => 'Chart with Error Bars' );

           # Insert the chart into the worksheet (with an offset).
           $worksheet->insert_chart( 'D34', $chart3, 25, 10 );

           #######################################################################
           #
           # Up-Down Bars example.
           #

           # Create a Line chart.
           my $chart4 = $workbook->add_chart( type => 'line', embedded => 1 );

           # Add the Up-Down Bars.
           $chart4->set_up_down_bars();

           # Configure the first series.
           $chart4->add_series(
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$7',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$B$2:$B$7',
           );

           # Configure the second series.
           $chart4->add_series(
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$7',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$C$2:$C$7',
           );

           # Add a chart title. and some axis labels.
           $chart4->set_title( name => 'Chart with Up-Down Bars' );

           # Insert the chart into the worksheet (with an offset).
           $worksheet->insert_chart( 'D50', $chart4, 25, 10 );

           #######################################################################
           #
           # High-Low Lines example.
           #

           # Create a Line chart.
           my $chart5 = $workbook->add_chart( type => 'line', embedded => 1 );

           # Add the High-Low lines.
           $chart5->set_high_low_lines();

           # Configure the first series.
           $chart5->add_series(
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$7',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$B$2:$B$7',
           );

           # Configure the second series.
           $chart5->add_series(
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$7',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$C$2:$C$7',
           );

           # Add a chart title. and some axis labels.
           $chart5->set_title( name => 'Chart with High-Low Lines' );

           # Insert the chart into the worksheet (with an offset).
           $worksheet->insert_chart( 'D66', $chart5, 25, 10 );

           #######################################################################
           #
           # Drop Lines example.
           #

           # Create a Line chart.
           my $chart6 = $workbook->add_chart( type => 'line', embedded => 1 );

           # Add Drop Lines.
           $chart6->set_drop_lines();

           # Configure the first series.
           $chart6->add_series(
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$7',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$B$2:$B$7',
           );

           # Configure the second series.
           $chart6->add_series(
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$A$7',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$C$2:$C$7',
           );

           # Add a chart title. and some axis labels.
           $chart6->set_title( name => 'Chart with Drop Lines' );

           # Insert the chart into the worksheet (with an offset).
           $worksheet->insert_chart( 'D82', $chart6, 25, 10 );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/chart_data_tools.pl>

   Example: chart_clustered.pl
       A demo of a clustered category chart in Excel::Writer::XLSX.

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           #######################################################################
           #
           # A demo of a clustered category chart in Excel::Writer::XLSX.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), March 2015, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'chart_clustered.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $bold      = $workbook->add_format( bold => 1 );

           # Add the worksheet data that the charts will refer to.
           my $headings = [ 'Types',  'Sub Type',   'Value 1', 'Value 2', 'Value 3' ];
           my $data = [
               [ 'Type 1', 'Sub Type A', 5000,      8000,      6000 ],
               [ '',       'Sub Type B', 2000,      3000,      4000 ],
               [ '',       'Sub Type C', 250,       1000,      2000 ],
               [ 'Type 2', 'Sub Type D', 6000,      6000,      6500 ],
               [ '',       'Sub Type E', 500,       300,       200 ],
           ];

           $worksheet->write( 'A1', $headings, $bold );
           $worksheet->write_col( 'A2', $data );

           # Create a new chart object. In this case an embedded chart.
           my $chart = $workbook->add_chart( type => 'column', embedded => 1 );

           # Configure the series. Note, that the categories are 2D ranges (from column A
           # to column B). This creates the clusters. The series are shown as formula
           # strings for clarity but you can also use the array syntax. See the docs.
           $chart->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$C$1',
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$B$6',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$C$2:$C$6',
           );

           $chart->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$D$1',
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$B$6',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$D$2:$D$6',
           );

           $chart->add_series(
               name       => '=Sheet1!$E$1',
               categories => '=Sheet1!$A$2:$B$6',
               values     => '=Sheet1!$E$2:$E$6',
           );

           # Set the Excel chart style.
           $chart->set_style( 37 );

           # Turn off the legend.
           $chart->set_legend( position => 'none' );

           # Insert the chart into the worksheet.
           $worksheet->insert_chart( 'G3', $chart );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/chart_clustered.pl>

   Example: chart_styles.pl
       An example showing all 48 default chart styles available in Excel 2007 using
       Excel::Writer::XLSX.. Note, these styles are not the same as the styles available in Excel
       2013.

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           #######################################################################
           #
           # An example showing all 48 default chart styles available in Excel 2007
           # using Excel::Writer::XLSX.. Note, these styles are not the same as the
           # styles available in Excel 2013.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), March 2015, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'chart_styles.xlsx' );

           # Show the styles for all of these chart types.
           my @chart_types = ( 'column', 'area', 'line', 'pie' );

           for my $chart_type ( @chart_types ) {

               # Add a worksheet for each chart type.
               my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet( ucfirst( $chart_type ) );
               $worksheet->set_zoom( 30 );
               my $style_number = 1;

               # Create 48 charts, each with a different style.
               for ( my $row_num = 0 ; $row_num < 90 ; $row_num += 15 ) {
                   for ( my $col_num = 0 ; $col_num < 64 ; $col_num += 8 ) {

                       my $chart = $workbook->add_chart(
                           type     => $chart_type,
                           embedded => 1
                       );

                       $chart->add_series( values => '=Data!$A$1:$A$6' );
                       $chart->set_title( name => 'Style ' . $style_number );
                       $chart->set_legend( none => 1 );
                       $chart->set_style( $style_number );

                       $worksheet->insert_chart( $row_num, $col_num, $chart );
                       $style_number++;
                   }
               }
           }

           # Create a worksheet with data for the charts.
           my $data = [ 10, 40, 50, 20, 10, 50 ];
           my $data_worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'Data' );
           $data_worksheet->write_col( 'A1', $data );
           $data_worksheet->hide();

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/chart_styles.pl>

   Example: colors.pl
       Demonstrates Excel::Writer::XLSX's named colours and the Excel colour palette.

       The set_custom_color() Worksheet method can be used to override one of the built-in
       palette values with a more suitable colour. See the main docs.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl -w

           ################################################################################
           #
           # Demonstrates Excel::Writer::XLSX's named colours and the Excel colour
           # palette.
           #
           # The set_custom_color() Worksheet method can be used to override one of the
           # built-in palette values with a more suitable colour. See the main docs.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), March 2002, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'colors.xlsx' );

           # Some common formats
           my $center = $workbook->add_format( align => 'center' );
           my $heading = $workbook->add_format( align => 'center', bold => 1 );

           ######################################################################
           #
           # Demonstrate the named colors.
           #

           my %colors = (
               0x08, 'black',
               0x0C, 'blue',
               0x10, 'brown',
               0x0F, 'cyan',
               0x17, 'gray',
               0x11, 'green',
               0x0B, 'lime',
               0x0E, 'magenta',
               0x12, 'navy',
               0x35, 'orange',
               0x21, 'pink',
               0x14, 'purple',
               0x0A, 'red',
               0x16, 'silver',
               0x09, 'white',
               0x0D, 'yellow',

           );

           my $worksheet1 = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'Named colors' );

           $worksheet1->set_column( 0, 3, 15 );

           $worksheet1->write( 0, 0, "Index", $heading );
           $worksheet1->write( 0, 1, "Index", $heading );
           $worksheet1->write( 0, 2, "Name",  $heading );
           $worksheet1->write( 0, 3, "Color", $heading );

           my $i = 1;

           while ( my ( $index, $color ) = each %colors ) {
               my $format = $workbook->add_format(
                   fg_color => $color,
                   pattern  => 1,
                   border   => 1
               );

               $worksheet1->write( $i + 1, 0, $index, $center );
               $worksheet1->write( $i + 1, 1, sprintf( "0x%02X", $index ), $center );
               $worksheet1->write( $i + 1, 2, $color, $center );
               $worksheet1->write( $i + 1, 3, '',     $format );
               $i++;
           }

           ######################################################################
           #
           # Demonstrate the standard Excel colors in the range 8..63.
           #

           my $worksheet2 = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'Standard colors' );

           $worksheet2->set_column( 0, 3, 15 );

           $worksheet2->write( 0, 0, "Index", $heading );
           $worksheet2->write( 0, 1, "Index", $heading );
           $worksheet2->write( 0, 2, "Color", $heading );
           $worksheet2->write( 0, 3, "Name",  $heading );

           for my $i ( 8 .. 63 ) {
               my $format = $workbook->add_format(
                   fg_color => $i,
                   pattern  => 1,
                   border   => 1
               );

               $worksheet2->write( ( $i - 7 ), 0, $i, $center );
               $worksheet2->write( ( $i - 7 ), 1, sprintf( "0x%02X", $i ), $center );
               $worksheet2->write( ( $i - 7 ), 2, '', $format );

               # Add the  color names
               if ( exists $colors{$i} ) {
                   $worksheet2->write( ( $i - 7 ), 3, $colors{$i}, $center );

               }
           }

           ######################################################################
           #
           # Demonstrate the Html colors.
           #

           %colors = (
               '#000000',  'black',
               '#0000FF',  'blue',
               '#800000',  'brown',
               '#00FFFF',  'cyan',
               '#808080',  'gray',
               '#008000',  'green',
               '#00FF00',  'lime',
               '#FF00FF',  'magenta',
               '#000080',  'navy',
               '#FF6600',  'orange',
               '#FF00FF',  'pink',
               '#800080',  'purple',
               '#FF0000',  'red',
               '#C0C0C0',  'silver',
               '#FFFFFF',  'white',
               '#FFFF00',  'yellow',
           );

           my $worksheet3 = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'Html colors' );

           $worksheet3->set_column( 0, 3, 15 );

           $worksheet3->write( 0, 0, "Html", $heading );
           $worksheet3->write( 0, 1, "Name",  $heading );
           $worksheet3->write( 0, 2, "Color", $heading );

           $i = 1;

           while ( my ( $html_color, $color ) = each %colors ) {
               my $format = $workbook->add_format(
                   fg_color => $html_color,
                   pattern  => 1,
                   border   => 1
               );

               $worksheet3->write( $i + 1, 1, $html_color, $center );
               $worksheet3->write( $i + 1, 2, $color,      $center );
               $worksheet3->write( $i + 1, 3, '',          $format );
               $i++;
           }

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/colors.pl>

   Example: comments1.pl
       This example demonstrates writing cell comments.

       A cell comment is indicated in Excel by a small red triangle in the upper right-hand
       corner of the cell.

       For more advanced comment options see comments2.pl.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # This example demonstrates writing cell comments.
           #
           # A cell comment is indicated in Excel by a small red triangle in the upper
           # right-hand corner of the cell.
           #
           # For more advanced comment options see comments2.pl.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), November 2005, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'comments1.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();

           $worksheet->write( 'A1', 'Hello' );
           $worksheet->write_comment( 'A1', 'This is a comment' );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/comments1.pl>

   Example: comments2.pl
       This example demonstrates writing cell comments.

       A cell comment is indicated in Excel by a small red triangle in the upper right-hand
       corner of the cell.

       Each of the worksheets demonstrates different features of cell comments.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # This example demonstrates writing cell comments.
           #
           # A cell comment is indicated in Excel by a small red triangle in the upper
           # right-hand corner of the cell.
           #
           # Each of the worksheets demonstrates different features of cell comments.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), November 2005, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook   = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'comments2.xlsx' );
           my $text_wrap  = $workbook->add_format( text_wrap => 1, valign => 'top' );
           my $worksheet1 = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $worksheet2 = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $worksheet3 = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $worksheet4 = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $worksheet5 = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $worksheet6 = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $worksheet7 = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $worksheet8 = $workbook->add_worksheet();

           # Variables that we will use in each example.
           my $cell_text = '';
           my $comment   = '';

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 1. Demonstrates a simple cell comments without formatting.
           #            comments.
           #

           # Set up some formatting.
           $worksheet1->set_column( 'C:C', 25 );
           $worksheet1->set_row( 2, 50 );
           $worksheet1->set_row( 5, 50 );

           # Simple ascii string.
           $cell_text = 'Hold the mouse over this cell to see the comment.';

           $comment = 'This is a comment.';

           $worksheet1->write( 'C3', $cell_text, $text_wrap );
           $worksheet1->write_comment( 'C3', $comment );

           $cell_text = 'This is a UTF-8 string.';
           $comment   = chr 0x263a;

           $worksheet1->write( 'C6', $cell_text, $text_wrap );
           $worksheet1->write_comment( 'C6', $comment );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 2. Demonstrates visible and hidden comments.
           #

           # Set up some formatting.
           $worksheet2->set_column( 'C:C', 25 );
           $worksheet2->set_row( 2, 50 );
           $worksheet2->set_row( 5, 50 );

           $cell_text = 'This cell comment is visible.';

           $comment = 'Hello.';

           $worksheet2->write( 'C3', $cell_text, $text_wrap );
           $worksheet2->write_comment( 'C3', $comment, visible => 1 );

           $cell_text = "This cell comment isn't visible (the default).";

           $comment = 'Hello.';

           $worksheet2->write( 'C6', $cell_text, $text_wrap );
           $worksheet2->write_comment( 'C6', $comment );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 3. Demonstrates visible and hidden comments set at the worksheet
           #            level.
           #

           # Set up some formatting.
           $worksheet3->set_column( 'C:C', 25 );
           $worksheet3->set_row( 2, 50 );
           $worksheet3->set_row( 5, 50 );
           $worksheet3->set_row( 8, 50 );

           # Make all comments on the worksheet visible.
           $worksheet3->show_comments();

           $cell_text = 'This cell comment is visible, explicitly.';

           $comment = 'Hello.';

           $worksheet3->write( 'C3', $cell_text, $text_wrap );
           $worksheet3->write_comment( 'C3', $comment, visible => 1 );

           $cell_text =
             'This cell comment is also visible because ' . 'we used show_comments().';

           $comment = 'Hello.';

           $worksheet3->write( 'C6', $cell_text, $text_wrap );
           $worksheet3->write_comment( 'C6', $comment );

           $cell_text = 'However, we can still override it locally.';

           $comment = 'Hello.';

           $worksheet3->write( 'C9', $cell_text, $text_wrap );
           $worksheet3->write_comment( 'C9', $comment, visible => 0 );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 4. Demonstrates changes to the comment box dimensions.
           #

           # Set up some formatting.
           $worksheet4->set_column( 'C:C', 25 );
           $worksheet4->set_row( 2,  50 );
           $worksheet4->set_row( 5,  50 );
           $worksheet4->set_row( 8,  50 );
           $worksheet4->set_row( 15, 50 );

           $worksheet4->show_comments();

           $cell_text = 'This cell comment is default size.';

           $comment = 'Hello.';

           $worksheet4->write( 'C3', $cell_text, $text_wrap );
           $worksheet4->write_comment( 'C3', $comment );

           $cell_text = 'This cell comment is twice as wide.';

           $comment = 'Hello.';

           $worksheet4->write( 'C6', $cell_text, $text_wrap );
           $worksheet4->write_comment( 'C6', $comment, x_scale => 2 );

           $cell_text = 'This cell comment is twice as high.';

           $comment = 'Hello.';

           $worksheet4->write( 'C9', $cell_text, $text_wrap );
           $worksheet4->write_comment( 'C9', $comment, y_scale => 2 );

           $cell_text = 'This cell comment is scaled in both directions.';

           $comment = 'Hello.';

           $worksheet4->write( 'C16', $cell_text, $text_wrap );
           $worksheet4->write_comment( 'C16', $comment, x_scale => 1.2, y_scale => 0.8 );

           $cell_text = 'This cell comment has width and height specified in pixels.';

           $comment = 'Hello.';

           $worksheet4->write( 'C19', $cell_text, $text_wrap );
           $worksheet4->write_comment( 'C19', $comment, width => 200, height => 20 );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 5. Demonstrates changes to the cell comment position.
           #

           $worksheet5->set_column( 'C:C', 25 );
           $worksheet5->set_row( 2,  50 );
           $worksheet5->set_row( 5,  50 );
           $worksheet5->set_row( 8,  50 );
           $worksheet5->set_row( 11, 50 );

           $worksheet5->show_comments();

           $cell_text = 'This cell comment is in the default position.';

           $comment = 'Hello.';

           $worksheet5->write( 'C3', $cell_text, $text_wrap );
           $worksheet5->write_comment( 'C3', $comment );

           $cell_text = 'This cell comment has been moved to another cell.';

           $comment = 'Hello.';

           $worksheet5->write( 'C6', $cell_text, $text_wrap );
           $worksheet5->write_comment( 'C6', $comment, start_cell => 'E4' );

           $cell_text = 'This cell comment has been moved to another cell.';

           $comment = 'Hello.';

           $worksheet5->write( 'C9', $cell_text, $text_wrap );
           $worksheet5->write_comment( 'C9', $comment, start_row => 8, start_col => 4 );

           $cell_text = 'This cell comment has been shifted within its default cell.';

           $comment = 'Hello.';

           $worksheet5->write( 'C12', $cell_text, $text_wrap );
           $worksheet5->write_comment( 'C12', $comment, x_offset => 30, y_offset => 12 );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 6. Demonstrates changes to the comment background colour.
           #

           $worksheet6->set_column( 'C:C', 25 );
           $worksheet6->set_row( 2, 50 );
           $worksheet6->set_row( 5, 50 );
           $worksheet6->set_row( 8, 50 );

           $worksheet6->show_comments();

           $cell_text = 'This cell comment has a different colour.';

           $comment = 'Hello.';

           $worksheet6->write( 'C3', $cell_text, $text_wrap );
           $worksheet6->write_comment( 'C3', $comment, color => 'green' );

           $cell_text = 'This cell comment has the default colour.';

           $comment = 'Hello.';

           $worksheet6->write( 'C6', $cell_text, $text_wrap );
           $worksheet6->write_comment( 'C6', $comment );

           $cell_text = 'This cell comment has a different colour.';

           $comment = 'Hello.';

           $worksheet6->write( 'C9', $cell_text, $text_wrap );
           $worksheet6->write_comment( 'C9', $comment, color => '#FF6600' );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 7. Demonstrates how to set the cell comment author.
           #

           $worksheet7->set_column( 'C:C', 30 );
           $worksheet7->set_row( 2,  50 );
           $worksheet7->set_row( 5,  50 );
           $worksheet7->set_row( 8,  50 );

           my $author = '';
           my $cell   = 'C3';

           $cell_text = "Move the mouse over this cell and you will see 'Cell commented "
             . "by $author' (blank) in the status bar at the bottom";

           $comment = 'Hello.';

           $worksheet7->write( $cell, $cell_text, $text_wrap );
           $worksheet7->write_comment( $cell, $comment );

           $author    = 'Perl';
           $cell      = 'C6';
           $cell_text = "Move the mouse over this cell and you will see 'Cell commented "
             . "by $author' in the status bar at the bottom";

           $comment = 'Hello.';

           $worksheet7->write( $cell, $cell_text, $text_wrap );
           $worksheet7->write_comment( $cell, $comment, author => $author );

           $author    = chr 0x20AC;
           $cell      = 'C9';
           $cell_text = "Move the mouse over this cell and you will see 'Cell commented "
             . "by $author' in the status bar at the bottom";
           $comment = 'Hello.';

           $worksheet7->write( $cell, $cell_text, $text_wrap );
           $worksheet7->write_comment( $cell, $comment, author => $author );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 8. Demonstrates the need to explicitly set the row height.
           #

           # Set up some formatting.
           $worksheet8->set_column( 'C:C', 25 );
           $worksheet8->set_row( 2, 80 );

           $worksheet8->show_comments();

           $cell_text =
               'The height of this row has been adjusted explicitly using '
             . 'set_row(). The size of the comment box is adjusted '
             . 'accordingly by Excel::Writer::XLSX.';

           $comment = 'Hello.';

           $worksheet8->write( 'C3', $cell_text, $text_wrap );
           $worksheet8->write_comment( 'C3', $comment );

           $cell_text =
               'The height of this row has been adjusted by Excel due to the '
             . 'text wrap property being set. Unfortunately this means that '
             . 'the height of the row is unknown to Excel::Writer::XLSX at '
             . "run time and thus the comment box is stretched as well.\n\n"
             . 'Use set_row() to specify the row height explicitly to avoid '
             . 'this problem.';

           $comment = 'Hello.';

           $worksheet8->write( 'C6', $cell_text, $text_wrap );
           $worksheet8->write_comment( 'C6', $comment );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/comments2.pl>

   Example: conditional_format.pl
       Example of how to add conditional formatting to an Excel::Writer::XLSX file.

       Conditional formatting allows you to apply a format to a cell or a range of cells based on
       certain criteria.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example of how to add conditional formatting to an Excel::Writer::XLSX file.
           #
           # Conditional formatting allows you to apply a format to a cell or a range of
           # cells based on certain criteria.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), October 2011, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook   = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'conditional_format.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet1 = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $worksheet2 = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $worksheet3 = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $worksheet4 = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $worksheet5 = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $worksheet6 = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $worksheet7 = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $worksheet8 = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $worksheet9 = $workbook->add_worksheet();

           # Light red fill with dark red text.
           my $format1 = $workbook->add_format(
               bg_color => '#FFC7CE',
               color    => '#9C0006',

           );

           # Green fill with dark green text.
           my $format2 = $workbook->add_format(
               bg_color => '#C6EFCE',
               color    => '#006100',

           );

           # Some sample data to run the conditional formatting against.
           my $data = [
               [ 34, 72,  38, 30, 75, 48, 75, 66, 84, 86 ],
               [ 6,  24,  1,  84, 54, 62, 60, 3,  26, 59 ],
               [ 28, 79,  97, 13, 85, 93, 93, 22, 5,  14 ],
               [ 27, 71,  40, 17, 18, 79, 90, 93, 29, 47 ],
               [ 88, 25,  33, 23, 67, 1,  59, 79, 47, 36 ],
               [ 24, 100, 20, 88, 29, 33, 38, 54, 54, 88 ],
               [ 6,  57,  88, 28, 10, 26, 37, 7,  41, 48 ],
               [ 52, 78,  1,  96, 26, 45, 47, 33, 96, 36 ],
               [ 60, 54,  81, 66, 81, 90, 80, 93, 12, 55 ],
               [ 70, 5,   46, 14, 71, 19, 66, 36, 41, 21 ],
           ];

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 1.
           #
           my $caption = 'Cells with values >= 50 are in light red. '
             . 'Values < 50 are in light green.';

           # Write the data.
           $worksheet1->write( 'A1', $caption );
           $worksheet1->write_col( 'B3', $data );

           # Write a conditional format over a range.
           $worksheet1->conditional_formatting( 'B3:K12',
               {
                   type     => 'cell',
                   criteria => '>=',
                   value    => 50,
                   format   => $format1,
               }
           );

           # Write another conditional format over the same range.
           $worksheet1->conditional_formatting( 'B3:K12',
               {
                   type     => 'cell',
                   criteria => '<',
                   value    => 50,
                   format   => $format2,
               }
           );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 2.
           #
           $caption = 'Values between 30 and 70 are in light red. '
             . 'Values outside that range are in light green.';

           $worksheet2->write( 'A1', $caption );
           $worksheet2->write_col( 'B3', $data );

           $worksheet2->conditional_formatting( 'B3:K12',
               {
                   type     => 'cell',
                   criteria => 'between',
                   minimum  => 30,
                   maximum  => 70,
                   format   => $format1,
               }
           );

           $worksheet2->conditional_formatting( 'B3:K12',
               {
                   type     => 'cell',
                   criteria => 'not between',
                   minimum  => 30,
                   maximum  => 70,
                   format   => $format2,
               }
           );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 3.
           #
           $caption = 'Duplicate values are in light red. '
             . 'Unique values are in light green.';

           $worksheet3->write( 'A1', $caption );
           $worksheet3->write_col( 'B3', $data );

           $worksheet3->conditional_formatting( 'B3:K12',
               {
                   type     => 'duplicate',
                   format   => $format1,
               }
           );

           $worksheet3->conditional_formatting( 'B3:K12',
               {
                   type     => 'unique',
                   format   => $format2,
               }
           );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 4.
           #
           $caption = 'Above average values are in light red. '
             . 'Below average values are in light green.';

           $worksheet4->write( 'A1', $caption );
           $worksheet4->write_col( 'B3', $data );

           $worksheet4->conditional_formatting( 'B3:K12',
               {
                   type     => 'average',
                   criteria => 'above',
                   format   => $format1,
               }
           );

           $worksheet4->conditional_formatting( 'B3:K12',
               {
                   type     => 'average',
                   criteria => 'below',
                   format   => $format2,
               }
           );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 5.
           #
           $caption = 'Top 10 values are in light red. '
             . 'Bottom 10 values are in light green.';

           $worksheet5->write( 'A1', $caption );
           $worksheet5->write_col( 'B3', $data );

           $worksheet5->conditional_formatting( 'B3:K12',
               {
                   type     => 'top',
                   value    => '10',
                   format   => $format1,
               }
           );

           $worksheet5->conditional_formatting( 'B3:K12',
               {
                   type     => 'bottom',
                   value    => '10',
                   format   => $format2,
               }
           );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 6.
           #
           $caption = 'Cells with values >= 50 are in light red. '
             . 'Values < 50 are in light green. Non-contiguous ranges.';

           # Write the data.
           $worksheet6->write( 'A1', $caption );
           $worksheet6->write_col( 'B3', $data );

           # Write a conditional format over a range.
           $worksheet6->conditional_formatting( 'B3:K6,B9:K12',
               {
                   type     => 'cell',
                   criteria => '>=',
                   value    => 50,
                   format   => $format1,
               }
           );

           # Write another conditional format over the same range.
           $worksheet6->conditional_formatting( 'B3:K6,B9:K12',
               {
                   type     => 'cell',
                   criteria => '<',
                   value    => 50,
                   format   => $format2,
               }
           );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 7.
           #
           $caption = 'Examples of color scales with default and user colors.';

           $data = [ 1 .. 12 ];

           $worksheet7->write( 'A1', $caption );

           $worksheet7->write    ( 'B2', "2 Color Scale" );
           $worksheet7->write_col( 'B3', $data );

           $worksheet7->write    ( 'D2', "2 Color Scale + user colors" );
           $worksheet7->write_col( 'D3', $data );

           $worksheet7->write    ( 'G2', "3 Color Scale" );
           $worksheet7->write_col( 'G3', $data );

           $worksheet7->write    ( 'I2', "3 Color Scale + user colors" );
           $worksheet7->write_col( 'I3', $data );

           $worksheet7->conditional_formatting( 'B3:B14',
               {
                   type => '2_color_scale',
               }
           );

           $worksheet7->conditional_formatting( 'D3:D14',
               {
                   type => '3_color_scale',
               }
           );

           $worksheet7->conditional_formatting( 'G3:G14',
               {
                   type      => '2_color_scale',
                   min_color => "#FF0000",
                   max_color => "#00FF00",

               }
           );

           $worksheet7->conditional_formatting( 'I3:I14',
               {
                   type      => '3_color_scale',
                   min_color => "#C5D9F1",
                   mid_color => "#8DB4E3",
                   max_color => "#538ED5",
               }
           );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 8.
           #
           $caption = 'Examples of data bars.';

           $data = [ 1 .. 12 ];

           $worksheet8->write( 'A1', $caption );

           $worksheet8->write    ( 'B2', "Default data bars" );
           $worksheet8->write_col( 'B3', $data );

           $worksheet8->write    ( 'D2', "Bars only" );
           $worksheet8->write_col( 'D3', $data );

           $worksheet8->write    ( 'F2', "With user color" );
           $worksheet8->write_col( 'F3', $data );

           $worksheet8->write    ( 'H2', "Solid bars" );
           $worksheet8->write_col( 'H3', $data );

           $worksheet8->write    ( 'J2', "Right to left" );
           $worksheet8->write_col( 'J3', $data );

           $data = [-1, -2, -3, -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 2, 1, 0];

           $worksheet8->write    ( 'L2', "Excel 2010 style" );
           $worksheet8->write_col( 'L3', $data );

           $worksheet8->write    ( 'N2', "Negative same as positive" );
           $worksheet8->write_col( 'N3', $data );

           $worksheet8->conditional_formatting( 'B3:B14',
               {
                   type      => 'data_bar'
               }
           );

           $worksheet8->conditional_formatting( 'D3:D14',
               {
                   type     => 'data_bar',
                   bar_only => 1
               }
           );

           $worksheet8->conditional_formatting( 'F3:F14',
               {
                   type      => 'data_bar',
                   bar_color => '#63C384'
               }
           );

           $worksheet8->conditional_formatting( 'H3:H14',
               {
                   type      => 'data_bar',
                   bar_solid => 1
               }
           );

           $worksheet8->conditional_formatting( 'J3:J14',
               {
                   type          => 'data_bar',
                   bar_direction => 'right'
               }
           );

           $worksheet8->conditional_formatting( 'L3:L14',
               {
                   type          => 'data_bar',
                   data_bar_2010 => 1
               }
           );

           $worksheet8->conditional_formatting( 'N3:N14',
               {
                   type                           => 'data_bar',
                   bar_negative_color_same        => 1,
                   bar_negative_border_color_same => 1
               }
           );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 9.
           #
           $caption = 'Examples of conditional formats with icon sets.';

           $data = [
               [ 1, 2, 3 ],
               [ 1, 2, 3 ],
               [ 1, 2, 3 ],
               [ 1, 2, 3 ],
               [ 1, 2, 3, 4 ],
               [ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ],
               [ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ],
           ];

           $worksheet9->write( 'A1', $caption );
           $worksheet9->write_col( 'B3', $data );

           $worksheet9->conditional_formatting( 'B3:D3',
               {
                   type         => 'icon_set',
                   icon_style   => '3_traffic_lights',
               }
           );

           $worksheet9->conditional_formatting( 'B4:D4',
               {
                   type         => 'icon_set',
                   icon_style   => '3_traffic_lights',
                   reverse_icons => 1,
               }
           );

           $worksheet9->conditional_formatting( 'B5:D5',
               {
                   type         => 'icon_set',
                   icon_style   => '3_traffic_lights',
                   icons_only   => 1,
               }
           );

           $worksheet9->conditional_formatting( 'B6:D6',
               {
                   type         => 'icon_set',
                   icon_style   => '3_arrows',
               }
           );

           $worksheet9->conditional_formatting( 'B7:E8',
               {
                   type         => 'icon_set',
                   icon_style   => '4_arrows',
               }
           );

           $worksheet9->conditional_formatting( 'B8:F8',
               {
                   type         => 'icon_set',
                   icon_style   => '5_arrows',
               }
           );

           $worksheet9->conditional_formatting( 'B9:F9',
               {
                   type         => 'icon_set',
                   icon_style   => '5_ratings',
               }
           );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/conditional_format.pl>

   Example: data_validate.pl
       Example of how to add data validation and dropdown lists to an Excel::Writer::XLSX file.

       Data validation is a feature of Excel which allows you to restrict the data that a user
       enters in a cell and to display help and warning messages. It also allows you to restrict
       input to values in a drop down list.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example of how to add data validation and dropdown lists to an
           # Excel::Writer::XLSX file.
           #
           # Data validation is a feature of Excel which allows you to restrict the data
           # that a user enters in a cell and to display help and warning messages. It
           # also allows you to restrict input to values in a drop down list.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), August 2008, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'data_validate.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();

           # Add a format for the header cells.
           my $header_format = $workbook->add_format(
               border    => 1,
               bg_color  => '#C6EFCE',
               bold      => 1,
               text_wrap => 1,
               valign    => 'vcenter',
               indent    => 1,
           );

           # Set up layout of the worksheet.
           $worksheet->set_column( 'A:A', 68 );
           $worksheet->set_column( 'B:B', 15 );
           $worksheet->set_column( 'D:D', 15 );
           $worksheet->set_row( 0, 36 );
           $worksheet->set_selection( 'B3' );

           # Write the header cells and some data that will be used in the examples.
           my $row = 0;
           my $txt;
           my $heading1 = 'Some examples of data validation in Excel::Writer::XLSX';
           my $heading2 = 'Enter values in this column';
           my $heading3 = 'Sample Data';

           $worksheet->write( 'A1', $heading1, $header_format );
           $worksheet->write( 'B1', $heading2, $header_format );
           $worksheet->write( 'D1', $heading3, $header_format );

           $worksheet->write( 'D3', [ 'Integers', 1, 10 ] );
           $worksheet->write( 'D4', [ 'List data', 'open', 'high', 'close' ] );
           $worksheet->write( 'D5', [ 'Formula', '=AND(F5=50,G5=60)', 50, 60 ] );

           #
           # Example 1. Limiting input to an integer in a fixed range.
           #
           $txt = 'Enter an integer between 1 and 10';
           $row += 2;

           $worksheet->write( $row, 0, $txt );
           $worksheet->data_validation(
               $row, 1,
               {
                   validate => 'integer',
                   criteria => 'between',
                   minimum  => 1,
                   maximum  => 10,
               }
           );

           #
           # Example 2. Limiting input to an integer outside a fixed range.
           #
           $txt = 'Enter an integer that is not between 1 and 10 (using cell references)';
           $row += 2;

           $worksheet->write( $row, 0, $txt );
           $worksheet->data_validation(
               $row, 1,
               {
                   validate => 'integer',
                   criteria => 'not between',
                   minimum  => '=E3',
                   maximum  => '=F3',
               }
           );

           #
           # Example 3. Limiting input to an integer greater than a fixed value.
           #
           $txt = 'Enter an integer greater than 0';
           $row += 2;

           $worksheet->write( $row, 0, $txt );
           $worksheet->data_validation(
               $row, 1,
               {
                   validate => 'integer',
                   criteria => '>',
                   value    => 0,
               }
           );

           #
           # Example 4. Limiting input to an integer less than a fixed value.
           #
           $txt = 'Enter an integer less than 10';
           $row += 2;

           $worksheet->write( $row, 0, $txt );
           $worksheet->data_validation(
               $row, 1,
               {
                   validate => 'integer',
                   criteria => '<',
                   value    => 10,
               }
           );

           #
           # Example 5. Limiting input to a decimal in a fixed range.
           #
           $txt = 'Enter a decimal between 0.1 and 0.5';
           $row += 2;

           $worksheet->write( $row, 0, $txt );
           $worksheet->data_validation(
               $row, 1,
               {
                   validate => 'decimal',
                   criteria => 'between',
                   minimum  => 0.1,
                   maximum  => 0.5,
               }
           );

           #
           # Example 6. Limiting input to a value in a dropdown list.
           #
           $txt = 'Select a value from a drop down list';
           $row += 2;

           $worksheet->write( $row, 0, $txt );
           $worksheet->data_validation(
               $row, 1,
               {
                   validate => 'list',
                   source   => [ 'open', 'high', 'close' ],
               }
           );

           #
           # Example 6. Limiting input to a value in a dropdown list.
           #
           $txt = 'Select a value from a drop down list (using a cell range)';
           $row += 2;

           $worksheet->write( $row, 0, $txt );
           $worksheet->data_validation(
               $row, 1,
               {
                   validate => 'list',
                   source   => '=$E$4:$G$4',
               }
           );

           #
           # Example 7. Limiting input to a date in a fixed range.
           #
           $txt = 'Enter a date between 1/1/2008 and 12/12/2008';
           $row += 2;

           $worksheet->write( $row, 0, $txt );
           $worksheet->data_validation(
               $row, 1,
               {
                   validate => 'date',
                   criteria => 'between',
                   minimum  => '2008-01-01T',
                   maximum  => '2008-12-12T',
               }
           );

           #
           # Example 8. Limiting input to a time in a fixed range.
           #
           $txt = 'Enter a time between 6:00 and 12:00';
           $row += 2;

           $worksheet->write( $row, 0, $txt );
           $worksheet->data_validation(
               $row, 1,
               {
                   validate => 'time',
                   criteria => 'between',
                   minimum  => 'T06:00',
                   maximum  => 'T12:00',
               }
           );

           #
           # Example 9. Limiting input to a string greater than a fixed length.
           #
           $txt = 'Enter a string longer than 3 characters';
           $row += 2;

           $worksheet->write( $row, 0, $txt );
           $worksheet->data_validation(
               $row, 1,
               {
                   validate => 'length',
                   criteria => '>',
                   value    => 3,
               }
           );

           #
           # Example 10. Limiting input based on a formula.
           #
           $txt = 'Enter a value if the following is true "=AND(F5=50,G5=60)"';
           $row += 2;

           $worksheet->write( $row, 0, $txt );
           $worksheet->data_validation(
               $row, 1,
               {
                   validate => 'custom',
                   value    => '=AND(F5=50,G5=60)',
               }
           );

           #
           # Example 11. Displaying and modify data validation messages.
           #
           $txt = 'Displays a message when you select the cell';
           $row += 2;

           $worksheet->write( $row, 0, $txt );
           $worksheet->data_validation(
               $row, 1,
               {
                   validate      => 'integer',
                   criteria      => 'between',
                   minimum       => 1,
                   maximum       => 100,
                   input_title   => 'Enter an integer:',
                   input_message => 'between 1 and 100',
               }
           );

           #
           # Example 12. Displaying and modify data validation messages.
           #
           $txt = 'Display a custom error message when integer isn\'t between 1 and 100';
           $row += 2;

           $worksheet->write( $row, 0, $txt );
           $worksheet->data_validation(
               $row, 1,
               {
                   validate      => 'integer',
                   criteria      => 'between',
                   minimum       => 1,
                   maximum       => 100,
                   input_title   => 'Enter an integer:',
                   input_message => 'between 1 and 100',
                   error_title   => 'Input value is not valid!',
                   error_message => 'It should be an integer between 1 and 100',
               }
           );

           #
           # Example 13. Displaying and modify data validation messages.
           #
           $txt =
             'Display a custom information message when integer isn\'t between 1 and 100';
           $row += 2;

           $worksheet->write( $row, 0, $txt );
           $worksheet->data_validation(
               $row, 1,
               {
                   validate      => 'integer',
                   criteria      => 'between',
                   minimum       => 1,
                   maximum       => 100,
                   input_title   => 'Enter an integer:',
                   input_message => 'between 1 and 100',
                   error_title   => 'Input value is not valid!',
                   error_message => 'It should be an integer between 1 and 100',
                   error_type    => 'information',
               }
           );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/data_validate.pl>

   Example: date_time.pl
       Excel::Writer::XLSX example of writing dates and times using the write_date_time()
       Worksheet method.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Excel::Writer::XLSX example of writing dates and times using the
           # write_date_time() Worksheet method.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), August 2004, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           # Create a new workbook and add a worksheet
           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'date_time.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $bold      = $workbook->add_format( bold => 1 );

           # Expand the first columns so that the date is visible.
           $worksheet->set_column( "A:B", 30 );

           # Write the column headers
           $worksheet->write( 'A1', 'Formatted date', $bold );
           $worksheet->write( 'B1', 'Format',         $bold );

           # Examples date and time formats. In the output file compare how changing
           # the format codes change the appearance of the date.
           #
           my @date_formats = (
               'dd/mm/yy',
               'mm/dd/yy',
               '',
               'd mm yy',
               'dd mm yy',
               '',
               'dd m yy',
               'dd mm yy',
               'dd mmm yy',
               'dd mmmm yy',
               '',
               'dd mm y',
               'dd mm yyy',
               'dd mm yyyy',
               '',
               'd mmmm yyyy',
               '',
               'dd/mm/yy',
               'dd/mm/yy hh:mm',
               'dd/mm/yy hh:mm:ss',
               'dd/mm/yy hh:mm:ss.000',
               '',
               'hh:mm',
               'hh:mm:ss',
               'hh:mm:ss.000',
           );

           # Write the same date and time using each of the above formats. The empty
           # string formats create a blank line to make the example clearer.
           #
           my $row = 0;
           for my $date_format ( @date_formats ) {
               $row++;
               next if $date_format eq '';

               # Create a format for the date or time.
               my $format = $workbook->add_format(
                   num_format => $date_format,
                   align      => 'left'
               );

               # Write the same date using different formats.
               $worksheet->write_date_time( $row, 0, '2004-08-01T12:30:45.123', $format );
               $worksheet->write( $row, 1, $date_format );
           }

           # The following is an example of an invalid date. It is written as a string
           # instead of a number. This is also Excel's default behaviour.
           #
           $row += 2;
           $worksheet->write_date_time( $row, 0, '2004-13-01T12:30:45.123' );
           $worksheet->write( $row, 1, 'Invalid date. Written as string.', $bold );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/date_time.pl>

   Example: defined_name.pl
       Example of how to create defined names in an Excel::Writer::XLSX file.

       This method is used to define a user friendly name to represent a value, a single cell or
       a range of cells in a workbook.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           ##############################################################################
           #
           # Example of how to create defined names in an Excel::Writer::XLSX file.
           #
           # This method is used to define a user friendly name to represent a value,
           # a single cell or a range of cells in a workbook.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), September 2008, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook   = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'defined_name.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet1 = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $worksheet2 = $workbook->add_worksheet();

           # Define some global/workbook names.
           $workbook->define_name( 'Exchange_rate', '=0.96' );
           $workbook->define_name( 'Sales',         '=Sheet1!$G$1:$H$10' );

           # Define a local/worksheet name.
           $workbook->define_name( 'Sheet2!Sales', '=Sheet2!$G$1:$G$10' );

           # Write some text in the file and one of the defined names in a formula.
           for my $worksheet ( $workbook->sheets() ) {
               $worksheet->set_column( 'A:A', 45 );
               $worksheet->write( 'A1', 'This worksheet contains some defined names.' );
               $worksheet->write( 'A2', 'See Formulas -> Name Manager above.' );
               $worksheet->write( 'A3', 'Example formula in cell B3 ->' );

               $worksheet->write( 'B3', '=Exchange_rate' );
           }

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/defined_name.pl>

   Example: diag_border.pl
       A simple formatting example that demonstrates how to add a diagonal cell border with
       Excel::Writer::XLSX

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl -w

           ##############################################################################
           #
           # A simple formatting example that demonstrates how to add a diagonal cell
           # border with Excel::Writer::XLSX
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), May 2004, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'diag_border.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();

           my $format1 = $workbook->add_format( diag_type => 1 );

           my $format2 = $workbook->add_format( diag_type => 2 );

           my $format3 = $workbook->add_format( diag_type => 3 );

           my $format4 = $workbook->add_format(
               diag_type   => 3,
               diag_border => 7,
               diag_color  => 'red',
           );

           $worksheet->write( 'B3',  'Text', $format1 );
           $worksheet->write( 'B6',  'Text', $format2 );
           $worksheet->write( 'B9',  'Text', $format3 );
           $worksheet->write( 'B12', 'Text', $format4 );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/diag_border.pl>

   Example: filehandle.pl
       Example of using Excel::Writer::XLSX to write Excel files to different filehandles.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example of using Excel::Writer::XLSX to write Excel files to different
           # filehandles.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), April 2003, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;
           use IO::Scalar;

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 1. This demonstrates the standard way of creating an Excel file by
           # specifying a file name.
           #

           my $workbook1  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'fh_01.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet1 = $workbook1->add_worksheet();

           $worksheet1->write( 0, 0, 'Hi Excel 1' );

           $workbook1->close();

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 2. Write an Excel file to an existing filehandle.
           #

           open TEST, '>', 'fh_02.xlsx' or die "Couldn't open file: $!";
           binmode TEST;   # Always do this regardless of whether the platform requires it.

           my $workbook2  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( \*TEST );
           my $worksheet2 = $workbook2->add_worksheet();

           $worksheet2->write( 0, 0, 'Hi Excel 2' );

           $workbook2->close();

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 3. Write an Excel file to an existing OO style filehandle.
           #

           my $fh = FileHandle->new( '> fh_03.xlsx' ) or die "Couldn't open file: $!";

           binmode( $fh );

           my $workbook3  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( $fh );
           my $worksheet3 = $workbook3->add_worksheet();

           $worksheet3->write( 0, 0, 'Hi Excel 3' );

           $workbook3->close();

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 4. Write an Excel file to a string via IO::Scalar. Please refer to
           # the IO::Scalar documentation for further details.
           #

           my $xlsx_str;

           tie *XLSX, 'IO::Scalar', \$xlsx_str;

           my $workbook4  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( \*XLSX );
           my $worksheet4 = $workbook4->add_worksheet();

           $worksheet4->write( 0, 0, 'Hi Excel 4' );
           $workbook4->close();    # This is required before we use the scalar

           # The Excel file is now in $xlsx_str. As a demonstration, print it to a file.
           open TMP, '>', 'fh_04.xlsx' or die "Couldn't open file: $!";
           binmode TMP;
           print TMP $xlsx_str;
           close TMP;

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 5. Write an Excel file to a string via IO::Scalar's newer interface.
           # Please refer to the IO::Scalar documentation for further details.
           #
           my $xlsx_str2;

           my $fh5 = IO::Scalar->new( \$xlsx_str2 );

           my $workbook5  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( $fh5 );
           my $worksheet5 = $workbook5->add_worksheet();

           $worksheet5->write( 0, 0, 'Hi Excel 5' );
           $workbook5->close();    # This is required before we use the scalar

           # The Excel file is now in $xlsx_str. As a demonstration, print it to a file.
           open TMP, '>', 'fh_05.xlsx' or die "Couldn't open file: $!";
           binmode TMP;
           print TMP $xlsx_str2;
           close TMP;

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/filehandle.pl>

   Example: headers.pl
       This program shows several examples of how to set up headers and footers with
       Excel::Writer::XLSX.

       The control characters used in the header/footer strings are:

           Control             Category            Description
           =======             ========            ===========
           &L                  Justification       Left
           &C                                      Center
           &R                                      Right

           &P                  Information         Page number
           &N                                      Total number of pages
           &D                                      Date
           &T                                      Time
           &F                                      File name
           &A                                      Worksheet name

           &fontsize           Font                Font size
           &"font,style"                           Font name and style
           &U                                      Single underline
           &E                                      Double underline
           &S                                      Strikethrough
           &X                                      Superscript
           &Y                                      Subscript

           &[Picture]          Images              Image placeholder
           &G                                      Same as &[Picture]

           &&                  Miscellaneous       Literal ampersand &

       See the main Excel::Writer::XLSX documentation for more information.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           ######################################################################
           #
           # This program shows several examples of how to set up headers and
           # footers with Excel::Writer::XLSX.
           #
           # The control characters used in the header/footer strings are:
           #
           #     Control             Category            Description
           #     =======             ========            ===========
           #     &L                  Justification       Left
           #     &C                                      Center
           #     &R                                      Right
           #
           #     &P                  Information         Page number
           #     &N                                      Total number of pages
           #     &D                                      Date
           #     &T                                      Time
           #     &F                                      File name
           #     &A                                      Worksheet name
           #
           #     &fontsize           Font                Font size
           #     &"font,style"                           Font name and style
           #     &U                                      Single underline
           #     &E                                      Double underline
           #     &S                                      Strikethrough
           #     &X                                      Superscript
           #     &Y                                      Subscript
           #
           #     &[Picture]          Images              Image placeholder
           #     &G                                      Same as &[Picture]
           #
           #     &&                  Miscellaneous       Literal ampersand &
           #
           # See the main Excel::Writer::XLSX documentation for more information.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), March 2002, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'headers.xlsx' );
           my $preview  = 'Select Print Preview to see the header and footer';

           ######################################################################
           #
           # A simple example to start
           #
           my $worksheet1 = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'Simple' );
           my $header1    = '&CHere is some centred text.';
           my $footer1    = '&LHere is some left aligned text.';

           $worksheet1->set_header( $header1 );
           $worksheet1->set_footer( $footer1 );

           $worksheet1->set_column( 'A:A', 50 );
           $worksheet1->write( 'A1', $preview );

           ######################################################################
           #
           # A simple example to start
           #
           my $worksheet2 = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'Image' );
           my $header2    = '&L&[Picture]';

           # Adjust the page top margin to allow space for the header image.
           $worksheet2->set_margin_top(1.75);

           $worksheet2->set_header( $header2, 0.3, {image_left => 'republic.png'});

           $worksheet2->set_column( 'A:A', 50 );
           $worksheet2->write( 'A1', $preview );

           ######################################################################
           #
           # This is an example of some of the header/footer variables.
           #
           my $worksheet3 = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'Variables' );
           my $header3    = '&LPage &P of &N' . '&CFilename: &F' . '&RSheetname: &A';
           my $footer3    = '&LCurrent date: &D' . '&RCurrent time: &T';

           $worksheet3->set_header( $header3 );
           $worksheet3->set_footer( $footer3 );

           $worksheet3->set_column( 'A:A', 50 );
           $worksheet3->write( 'A1',  $preview );
           $worksheet3->write( 'A21', 'Next sheet' );
           $worksheet3->set_h_pagebreaks( 20 );

           ######################################################################
           #
           # This example shows how to use more than one font
           #
           my $worksheet4 = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'Mixed fonts' );
           my $header4    = q(&C&"Courier New,Bold"Hello &"Arial,Italic"World);
           my $footer4    = q(&C&"Symbol"e&"Arial" = mc&X2);

           $worksheet4->set_header( $header4 );
           $worksheet4->set_footer( $footer4 );

           $worksheet4->set_column( 'A:A', 50 );
           $worksheet4->write( 'A1', $preview );

           ######################################################################
           #
           # Example of line wrapping
           #
           my $worksheet5 = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'Word wrap' );
           my $header5    = "&CHeading 1\nHeading 2";

           $worksheet5->set_header( $header5 );

           $worksheet5->set_column( 'A:A', 50 );
           $worksheet5->write( 'A1', $preview );

           ######################################################################
           #
           # Example of inserting a literal ampersand &
           #
           my $worksheet6 = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'Ampersand' );
           my $header6    = '&CCuriouser && Curiouser - Attorneys at Law';

           $worksheet6->set_header( $header6 );

           $worksheet6->set_column( 'A:A', 50 );
           $worksheet6->write( 'A1', $preview );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/headers.pl>

   Example: hide_row_col.pl
       Example of how to hide rows and columns in Excel::Writer::XLSX. In order to hide rows
       without setting each one, (of approximately 1 million rows), Excel uses an optimisation to
       hide all rows that don't have data.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example of how to hide rows and columns in Excel::Writer::XLSX. In order to
           # hide rows without setting each one, (of approximately 1 million rows),
           # Excel uses an optimisation to hide all rows that don't have data.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), December 2012, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'hide_row_col.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();

           # Write some data.
           $worksheet->write( 'D1', 'Some hidden columns.' );
           $worksheet->write( 'A8', 'Some hidden rows.' );

           # Hide all rows without data.
           $worksheet->set_default_row( undef, 1 );

           # Set emptys row that we do want to display. All other will be hidden.
           for my $row (1 .. 6) {
               $worksheet->set_row( $row, 15 );
           }

           # Hide a range of columns.
           $worksheet->set_column( 'G:XFD', undef, undef, 1);

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/hide_row_col.pl>

   Example: hide_sheet.pl
       Example of how to hide a worksheet with Excel::Writer::XLSX.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           #######################################################################
           #
           # Example of how to hide a worksheet with Excel::Writer::XLSX.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), April 2005, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook   = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'hide_sheet.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet1 = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $worksheet2 = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $worksheet3 = $workbook->add_worksheet();

           $worksheet1->set_column( 'A:A', 30 );
           $worksheet2->set_column( 'A:A', 30 );
           $worksheet3->set_column( 'A:A', 30 );

           # Sheet2 won't be visible until it is unhidden in Excel.
           $worksheet2->hide();

           $worksheet1->write( 0, 0, 'Sheet2 is hidden' );
           $worksheet2->write( 0, 0, "Now it's my turn to find you." );
           $worksheet3->write( 0, 0, 'Sheet2 is hidden' );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/hide_sheet.pl>

   Example: hyperlink1.pl
       Example of how to use the Excel::Writer::XLSX module to write hyperlinks

       See also hyperlink2.pl for worksheet URL examples.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example of how to use the Excel::Writer::XLSX module to write hyperlinks
           #
           # See also hyperlink2.pl for worksheet URL examples.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), May 2004, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           # Create a new workbook and add a worksheet
           my $workbook = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'hyperlink.xlsx' );

           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'Hyperlinks' );

           # Format the first column
           $worksheet->set_column( 'A:A', 30 );
           $worksheet->set_selection( 'B1' );

           # Add a user defined hyperlink format.
           my $red_format = $workbook->add_format(
               color     => 'red',
               bold      => 1,
               underline => 1,
               size      => 12,
           );

           # Add an alternate description string to the URL.
           my $str = 'Perl home.';

           # Add a "tool tip" to the URL.
           my $tip = 'Get the latest Perl news here.';

           # Write some hyperlinks. Unspecified or undefined format paraamters will be
           # replace with the defuault Excel hyperlink style.
           $worksheet->write( 'A1', 'http://www.perl.com/' );
           $worksheet->write( 'A3', 'http://www.perl.com/', undef, $str );
           $worksheet->write( 'A5', 'http://www.perl.com/', undef, $str, $tip );
           $worksheet->write( 'A7', 'http://www.perl.com/', $red_format );
           $worksheet->write( 'A9', 'mailto:jmcnamara@cpan.org', undef, 'Mail me' );

           # Write a URL that isn't a hyperlink
           $worksheet->write_string( 'A11', 'http://www.perl.com/' );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/hyperlink1.pl>

   Example: hyperlink2.pl
       Example of how to use the Excel::Writer::XLSX module to write internal and external
       hyperlinks.

       If you wish to run this program and follow the hyperlinks you should create the following
       directory structure:

       C:\ -- Temp --+-- Europe
                     |
                     \-- Asia

       See also hyperlink1.pl for web URL examples.

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example of how to use the Excel::Writer::XLSX module to write internal and
           # external hyperlinks.
           #
           # If you wish to run this program and follow the hyperlinks you should create
           # the following directory structure:
           #
           # C:\ -- Temp --+-- Europe
           #               |
           #               \-- Asia
           #
           #
           # See also hyperlink1.pl for web URL examples.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), February 2002, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           # Create three workbooks:
           #   C:\Temp\Europe\Ireland.xlsx
           #   C:\Temp\Europe\Italy.xlsx
           #   C:\Temp\Asia\China.xlsx
           #

           my $ireland = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'C:\Temp\Europe\Ireland.xlsx' );

           my $ire_links      = $ireland->add_worksheet( 'Links' );
           my $ire_sales      = $ireland->add_worksheet( 'Sales' );
           my $ire_data       = $ireland->add_worksheet( 'Product Data' );
           my $ire_url_format = $ireland->get_default_url_format();

           my $italy = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'C:\Temp\Europe\Italy.xlsx' );

           my $ita_links      = $italy->add_worksheet( 'Links' );
           my $ita_sales      = $italy->add_worksheet( 'Sales' );
           my $ita_data       = $italy->add_worksheet( 'Product Data' );
           my $ita_url_format = $italy->get_default_url_format();

           my $china = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'C:\Temp\Asia\China.xlsx' );

           my $cha_links      = $china->add_worksheet( 'Links' );
           my $cha_sales      = $china->add_worksheet( 'Sales' );
           my $cha_data       = $china->add_worksheet( 'Product Data' );
           my $cha_url_format = $china->get_default_url_format();

           # Add an alternative format
           my $format = $ireland->add_format( color => 'green', bold => 1 );
           $ire_links->set_column( 'A:B', 25 );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Examples of internal links
           #
           $ire_links->write( 'A1', 'Internal links', $format );

           # Internal link
           $ire_links->write_url( 'A2', 'internal:Sales!A2', $ire_url_format );

           # Internal link to a range
           $ire_links->write_url( 'A3', 'internal:Sales!A3:D3', $ire_url_format );

           # Internal link with an alternative string
           $ire_links->write_url( 'A4', 'internal:Sales!A4', $ire_url_format, 'Link' );

           # Internal link with an alternative format
           $ire_links->write_url( 'A5', 'internal:Sales!A5', $format );

           # Internal link with an alternative string and format
           $ire_links->write_url( 'A6', 'internal:Sales!A6', $ire_url_format, 'Link' );

           # Internal link (spaces in worksheet name)
           $ire_links->write_url( 'A7', q{internal:'Product Data'!A7}, $ire_url_format );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Examples of external links
           #
           $ire_links->write( 'B1', 'External links', $format );

           # External link to a local file
           $ire_links->write_url( 'B2', 'external:Italy.xlsx', $ire_url_format );

           # External link to a local file with worksheet
           $ire_links->write_url( 'B3', 'external:Italy.xlsx#Sales!B3', $ire_url_format );

           # External link to a local file with worksheet and alternative string
           $ire_links->write_url( 'B4', 'external:Italy.xlsx#Sales!B4', $ire_url_format, 'Link' );

           # External link to a local file with worksheet and format
           $ire_links->write_url( 'B5', 'external:Italy.xlsx#Sales!B5', $format );

           # External link to a remote file, absolute path
           $ire_links->write_url( 'B6', 'external:C:/Temp/Asia/China.xlsx', $ire_url_format );

           # External link to a remote file, relative path
           $ire_links->write_url( 'B7', 'external:../Asia/China.xlsx', $ire_url_format );

           # External link to a remote file with worksheet
           $ire_links->write_url( 'B8', 'external:C:/Temp/Asia/China.xlsx#Sales!B8', $ire_url_format );

           # External link to a remote file with worksheet (with spaces in the name)
           $ire_links->write_url( 'B9', q{external:C:/Temp/Asia/China.xlsx#'Product Data'!B9}, $ire_url_format );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Some utility links to return to the main sheet
           #
           $ire_sales->write_url( 'A2', 'internal:Links!A2', $ire_url_format, 'Back' );
           $ire_sales->write_url( 'A3', 'internal:Links!A3', $ire_url_format, 'Back' );
           $ire_sales->write_url( 'A4', 'internal:Links!A4', $ire_url_format, 'Back' );
           $ire_sales->write_url( 'A5', 'internal:Links!A5', $ire_url_format, 'Back' );
           $ire_sales->write_url( 'A6', 'internal:Links!A6', $ire_url_format, 'Back' );
           $ire_data->write_url ( 'A7', 'internal:Links!A7', $ire_url_format, 'Back' );

           $ita_links->write_url( 'A1', 'external:Ireland.xlsx#Links!B2', $ita_url_format, 'Back' );
           $ita_sales->write_url( 'B3', 'external:Ireland.xlsx#Links!B3', $ita_url_format, 'Back' );
           $ita_sales->write_url( 'B4', 'external:Ireland.xlsx#Links!B4', $ita_url_format, 'Back' );
           $ita_sales->write_url( 'B5', 'external:Ireland.xlsx#Links!B5', $ita_url_format, 'Back' );
           $cha_links->write_url( 'A1', 'external:C:/Temp/Europe/Ireland.xlsx#Links!B6', $cha_url_format, 'Back' );
           $cha_sales->write_url( 'B8', 'external:C:/Temp/Europe/Ireland.xlsx#Links!B8', $cha_url_format, 'Back' );
           $cha_data->write_url ( 'B9', 'external:C:/Temp/Europe/Ireland.xlsx#Links!B9', $cha_url_format, 'Back' );

           $ireland->close();
           $italy->close();
           $china->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/hyperlink2.pl>

   Example: indent.pl
       A simple formatting example using Excel::Writer::XLSX.

       This program demonstrates the indentation cell format.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl -w

           ##############################################################################
           #
           # A simple formatting example using Excel::Writer::XLSX.
           #
           # This program demonstrates the indentation cell format.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), May 2004, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'indent.xlsx' );

           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $indent1   = $workbook->add_format( indent => 1 );
           my $indent2   = $workbook->add_format( indent => 2 );

           $worksheet->set_column( 'A:A', 40 );

           $worksheet->write( 'A1', "This text is indented 1 level",  $indent1 );
           $worksheet->write( 'A2', "This text is indented 2 levels", $indent2 );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/indent.pl>

   Example: macros.pl
       An example of adding macros to an Excel::Writer::XLSX file using a VBA project file
       extracted from an existing Excel xlsm file.

       The "extract_vba" utility supplied with Excel::Writer::XLSX can be used to extract the
       vbaProject.bin file.

       An embedded macro is connected to a form button on the worksheet.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           #######################################################################
           #
           # An example of adding macros to an Excel::Writer::XLSX file using
           # a VBA project file extracted from an existing Excel xlsm file.
           #
           # The C<extract_vba> utility supplied with Excel::Writer::XLSX can be
           # used to extract the vbaProject.bin file.
           #
           # An embedded macro is connected to a form button on the worksheet.
           #
           # reverse('(c)'), November 2012, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           # Note the file extension should be .xlsm.
           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'macros.xlsm' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();

           $worksheet->set_column( 'A:A', 30 );

           # Add the VBA project binary.
           $workbook->add_vba_project( './vbaProject.bin' );

           # Show text for the end user.
           $worksheet->write( 'A3', 'Press the button to say hello.' );

           # Add a button tied to a macro in the VBA project.
           $worksheet->insert_button(
               'B3',
               {
                   macro   => 'say_hello',
                   caption => 'Press Me',
                   width   => 80,
                   height  => 30
               }
           );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/macros.pl>

   Example: merge1.pl
       Simple example of merging cells using the Excel::Writer::XLSX module.

       This example merges three cells using the "Centre Across Selection" alignment which was
       the Excel 5 method of achieving a merge. For a more modern approach use the merge_range()
       worksheet method instead.  See the merge3.pl - merge6.pl programs.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Simple example of merging cells using the Excel::Writer::XLSX module.
           #
           # This example merges three cells using the "Centre Across Selection"
           # alignment which was the Excel 5 method of achieving a merge. For a more
           # modern approach use the merge_range() worksheet method instead.
           # See the merge3.pl - merge6.pl programs.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), August 2002, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           # Create a new workbook and add a worksheet
           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'merge1.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();

           # Increase the cell size of the merged cells to highlight the formatting.
           $worksheet->set_column( 'B:D', 20 );
           $worksheet->set_row( 2, 30 );

           # Create a merge format
           my $format = $workbook->add_format( center_across => 1 );

           # Only one cell should contain text, the others should be blank.
           $worksheet->write( 2, 1, "Center across selection", $format );
           $worksheet->write_blank( 2, 2, $format );
           $worksheet->write_blank( 2, 3, $format );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/merge1.pl>

   Example: merge2.pl
       Simple example of merging cells using the Excel::Writer::XLSX module

       This example merges three cells using the "Centre Across Selection" alignment which was
       the Excel 5 method of achieving a merge. For a more modern approach use the merge_range()
       worksheet method instead.  See the merge3.pl - merge6.pl programs.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Simple example of merging cells using the Excel::Writer::XLSX module
           #
           # This example merges three cells using the "Centre Across Selection"
           # alignment which was the Excel 5 method of achieving a merge. For a more
           # modern approach use the merge_range() worksheet method instead.
           # See the merge3.pl - merge6.pl programs.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), August 2002, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           # Create a new workbook and add a worksheet
           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'merge2.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();

           # Increase the cell size of the merged cells to highlight the formatting.
           $worksheet->set_column( 1, 2, 30 );
           $worksheet->set_row( 2, 40 );

           # Create a merged format
           my $format = $workbook->add_format(
               center_across => 1,
               bold          => 1,
               size          => 15,
               pattern       => 1,
               border        => 6,
               color         => 'white',
               fg_color      => 'green',
               border_color  => 'yellow',
               align         => 'vcenter',
           );

           # Only one cell should contain text, the others should be blank.
           $worksheet->write( 2, 1, "Center across selection", $format );
           $worksheet->write_blank( 2, 2, $format );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/merge2.pl>

   Example: merge3.pl
       Example of how to use Excel::Writer::XLSX to write a hyperlink in a merged cell.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example of how to use Excel::Writer::XLSX to write a hyperlink in a
           # merged cell.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), September 2002, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           # Create a new workbook and add a worksheet
           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'merge3.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();

           # Increase the cell size of the merged cells to highlight the formatting.
           $worksheet->set_row( $_, 30 ) for ( 3, 6, 7 );
           $worksheet->set_column( 'B:D', 20 );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example: Merge cells containing a hyperlink using merge_range().
           #
           my $format = $workbook->add_format(
               border    => 1,
               underline => 1,
               color     => 'blue',
               align     => 'center',
               valign    => 'vcenter',
           );

           # Merge 3 cells
           $worksheet->merge_range( 'B4:D4', 'http://www.perl.com', $format );

           # Merge 3 cells over two rows
           $worksheet->merge_range( 'B7:D8', 'http://www.perl.com', $format );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/merge3.pl>

   Example: merge4.pl
       Example of how to use the Excel::Writer::XLSX merge_range() workbook method with complex
       formatting.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example of how to use the Excel::Writer::XLSX merge_range() workbook
           # method with complex formatting.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), September 2002, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           # Create a new workbook and add a worksheet
           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'merge4.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();

           # Increase the cell size of the merged cells to highlight the formatting.
           $worksheet->set_row( $_, 30 ) for ( 1 .. 11 );
           $worksheet->set_column( 'B:D', 20 );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 1: Text centered vertically and horizontally
           #
           my $format1 = $workbook->add_format(
               border => 6,
               bold   => 1,
               color  => 'red',
               valign => 'vcenter',
               align  => 'center',
           );

           $worksheet->merge_range( 'B2:D3', 'Vertical and horizontal', $format1 );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 2: Text aligned to the top and left
           #
           my $format2 = $workbook->add_format(
               border => 6,
               bold   => 1,
               color  => 'red',
               valign => 'top',
               align  => 'left',
           );

           $worksheet->merge_range( 'B5:D6', 'Aligned to the top and left', $format2 );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 3:  Text aligned to the bottom and right
           #
           my $format3 = $workbook->add_format(
               border => 6,
               bold   => 1,
               color  => 'red',
               valign => 'bottom',
               align  => 'right',
           );

           $worksheet->merge_range( 'B8:D9', 'Aligned to the bottom and right', $format3 );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 4:  Text justified (i.e. wrapped) in the cell
           #
           my $format4 = $workbook->add_format(
               border => 6,
               bold   => 1,
               color  => 'red',
               valign => 'top',
               align  => 'justify',
           );

           $worksheet->merge_range( 'B11:D12', 'Justified: ' . 'so on and ' x 18,
               $format4 );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/merge4.pl>

   Example: merge5.pl
       Example of how to use the Excel::Writer::XLSX merge_cells() workbook method with complex
       formatting and rotation.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example of how to use the Excel::Writer::XLSX merge_cells() workbook
           # method with complex formatting and rotation.
           #
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), September 2002, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           # Create a new workbook and add a worksheet
           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'merge5.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();

           # Increase the cell size of the merged cells to highlight the formatting.
           $worksheet->set_row( $_, 36 ) for ( 3 .. 8 );
           $worksheet->set_column( $_, $_, 15 ) for ( 1, 3, 5 );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Rotation 1, letters run from top to bottom
           #
           my $format1 = $workbook->add_format(
               border   => 6,
               bold     => 1,
               color    => 'red',
               valign   => 'vcentre',
               align    => 'centre',
               rotation => 270,
           );

           $worksheet->merge_range( 'B4:B9', 'Rotation 270', $format1 );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Rotation 2, 90° anticlockwise
           #
           my $format2 = $workbook->add_format(
               border   => 6,
               bold     => 1,
               color    => 'red',
               valign   => 'vcentre',
               align    => 'centre',
               rotation => 90,
           );

           $worksheet->merge_range( 'D4:D9', 'Rotation 90°', $format2 );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Rotation 3, 90° clockwise
           #
           my $format3 = $workbook->add_format(
               border   => 6,
               bold     => 1,
               color    => 'red',
               valign   => 'vcentre',
               align    => 'centre',
               rotation => -90,
           );

           $worksheet->merge_range( 'F4:F9', 'Rotation -90°', $format3 );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/merge5.pl>

   Example: merge6.pl
       Example of how to use the Excel::Writer::XLSX merge_cells() workbook method with Unicode
       strings.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example of how to use the Excel::Writer::XLSX merge_cells() workbook
           # method with Unicode strings.
           #
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), December 2005, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           # Create a new workbook and add a worksheet
           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'merge6.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();

           # Increase the cell size of the merged cells to highlight the formatting.
           $worksheet->set_row( $_, 36 ) for 2 .. 9;
           $worksheet->set_column( 'B:D', 25 );

           # Format for the merged cells.
           my $format = $workbook->add_format(
               border => 6,
               bold   => 1,
               color  => 'red',
               size   => 20,
               valign => 'vcentre',
               align  => 'left',
               indent => 1,
           );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Write an Ascii string.
           #
           $worksheet->merge_range( 'B3:D4', 'ASCII: A simple string', $format );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Write a UTF-8 Unicode string.
           #
           my $smiley = chr 0x263a;
           $worksheet->merge_range( 'B6:D7', "UTF-8: A Unicode smiley $smiley", $format );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/merge6.pl>

   Example: mod_perl1.pl
       Example of how to use the Excel::Writer::XLSX module to send an Excel file to a browser
       using mod_perl 1 and Apache

       This module ties *XLSX directly to Apache, and with the correct content-disposition/types
       it will prompt the user to save the file, or open it at this location.

       This script is a modification of the Excel::Writer::XLSX cgi.pl example.

       Change the name of this file to Cgi.pm.  Change the package location to wherever you
       locate this package.  In the example below it is located in the Excel::Writer::XLSX
       directory.

       Your httpd.conf entry for this module, should you choose to use it as a stand alone app,
       should look similar to the following:

           <Location /spreadsheet-test>
             SetHandler perl-script
             PerlHandler Excel::Writer::XLSX::Cgi
             PerlSendHeader On
           </Location>

       The PerlHandler name above and the package name below *have* to match.

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example of how to use the Excel::Writer::XLSX module to send an Excel
           # file to a browser using mod_perl 1 and Apache
           #
           # This module ties *XLSX directly to Apache, and with the correct
           # content-disposition/types it will prompt the user to save
           # the file, or open it at this location.
           #
           # This script is a modification of the Excel::Writer::XLSX cgi.pl example.
           #
           # Change the name of this file to Cgi.pm.
           # Change the package location to wherever you locate this package.
           # In the example below it is located in the Excel::Writer::XLSX directory.
           #
           # Your httpd.conf entry for this module, should you choose to use it
           # as a stand alone app, should look similar to the following:
           #
           #     <Location /spreadsheet-test>
           #       SetHandler perl-script
           #       PerlHandler Excel::Writer::XLSX::Cgi
           #       PerlSendHeader On
           #     </Location>
           #
           # The PerlHandler name above and the package name below *have* to match.

           # Apr 2001, Thomas Sullivan, webmaster@860.org
           # Feb 2001, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org

           package Excel::Writer::XLSX::Cgi;

           ##########################################
           # Pragma Definitions
           ##########################################
           use strict;

           ##########################################
           # Required Modules
           ##########################################
           use Apache::Constants qw(:common);
           use Apache::Request;
           use Apache::URI;    # This may not be needed
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           ##########################################
           # Main App Body
           ##########################################
           sub handler {

               # New apache object
               # Should you decide to use it.
               my $r = Apache::Request->new( shift );

               # Set the filename and send the content type
               # This will appear when they save the spreadsheet
               my $filename = "cgitest.xlsx";

               ####################################################
               ## Send the content type headers
               ####################################################
               print "Content-disposition: attachment;filename=$filename\n";
               print "Content-type: application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet\n\n";

               ####################################################
               # Tie a filehandle to Apache's STDOUT.
               # Create a new workbook and add a worksheet.
               ####################################################
               tie *XLSX => 'Apache';
               binmode( *XLSX );

               my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( \*XLSX );
               my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();

               # Set the column width for column 1
               $worksheet->set_column( 0, 0, 20 );

               # Create a format
               my $format = $workbook->add_format();
               $format->set_bold();
               $format->set_size( 15 );
               $format->set_color( 'blue' );

               # Write to the workbook
               $worksheet->write( 0, 0, "Hi Excel!", $format );

               # You must close the workbook for Content-disposition
               $workbook->close();
           }

           1;

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/mod_perl1.pl>

   Example: mod_perl2.pl
       Example of how to use the Excel::Writer::XLSX module to send an Excel file to a browser
       using mod_perl 2 and Apache.

       This module ties *XLSX directly to Apache, and with the correct content-disposition/types
       it will prompt the user to save the file, or open it at this location.

       This script is a modification of the Excel::Writer::XLSX cgi.pl example.

       Change the name of this file to MP2Test.pm.  Change the package location to wherever you
       locate this package.  In the example below it is located in the Excel::Writer::XLSX
       directory.

       Your httpd.conf entry for this module, should you choose to use it as a stand alone app,
       should look similar to the following:

           PerlModule Apache2::RequestRec
           PerlModule APR::Table
           PerlModule Apache2::RequestIO

           <Location /spreadsheet-test>
              SetHandler perl-script
              PerlResponseHandler Excel::Writer::XLSX::MP2Test
           </Location>

       The PerlResponseHandler must match the package name below.

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example of how to use the Excel::Writer::XLSX module to send an Excel
           # file to a browser using mod_perl 2 and Apache.
           #
           # This module ties *XLSX directly to Apache, and with the correct
           # content-disposition/types it will prompt the user to save
           # the file, or open it at this location.
           #
           # This script is a modification of the Excel::Writer::XLSX cgi.pl example.
           #
           # Change the name of this file to MP2Test.pm.
           # Change the package location to wherever you locate this package.
           # In the example below it is located in the Excel::Writer::XLSX directory.
           #
           # Your httpd.conf entry for this module, should you choose to use it
           # as a stand alone app, should look similar to the following:
           #
           #     PerlModule Apache2::RequestRec
           #     PerlModule APR::Table
           #     PerlModule Apache2::RequestIO
           #
           #     <Location /spreadsheet-test>
           #        SetHandler perl-script
           #        PerlResponseHandler Excel::Writer::XLSX::MP2Test
           #     </Location>
           #
           # The PerlResponseHandler must match the package name below.

           # Jun 2004, Matisse Enzer, matisse@matisse.net  (mod_perl 2 version)
           # Apr 2001, Thomas Sullivan, webmaster@860.org
           # Feb 2001, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org

           package Excel::Writer::XLSX::MP2Test;

           ##########################################
           # Pragma Definitions
           ##########################################
           use strict;

           ##########################################
           # Required Modules
           ##########################################
           use Apache2::Const -compile => qw( :common );
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           ##########################################
           # Main App Body
           ##########################################
           sub handler {
               my ( $r ) = @_;   # Apache request object is passed to handler in mod_perl 2

               # Set the filename and send the content type
               # This will appear when they save the spreadsheet
               my $filename = "mod_perl2_test.xlsx";

               ####################################################
               ## Send the content type headers the mod_perl 2 way
               ####################################################
               $r->headers_out->{'Content-Disposition'} = "attachment;filename=$filename";
               $r->content_type( 'application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet' );

               ####################################################
               # Tie a filehandle to Apache's STDOUT.
               # Create a new workbook and add a worksheet.
               ####################################################
               tie *XLSX => $r;  # The mod_perl 2 way. Tie to the Apache::RequestRec object
               binmode( *XLSX );

               my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( \*XLSX );
               my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();

               # Set the column width for column 1
               $worksheet->set_column( 0, 0, 20 );

               # Create a format
               my $format = $workbook->add_format();
               $format->set_bold();
               $format->set_size( 15 );
               $format->set_color( 'blue' );

               # Write to the workbook
               $worksheet->write( 0, 0, 'Hi Excel! from ' . $r->hostname, $format );

               # You must close the workbook for Content-disposition
               $workbook->close();
               return Apache2::Const::OK;
           }

           1;

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/mod_perl2.pl>

   Example: outline.pl
       Example of how use Excel::Writer::XLSX to generate Excel outlines and grouping.

       Excel allows you to group rows or columns so that they can be hidden or displayed with a
       single mouse click. This feature is referred to as outlines.

       Outlines can reduce complex data down to a few salient sub-totals or summaries.

       This feature is best viewed in Excel but the following is an ASCII representation of what
       a worksheet with three outlines might look like.  Rows 3-4 and rows 7-8 are grouped at
       level 2. Rows 2-9 are grouped at level 1. The lines at the left hand side are called
       outline level bars.

                   ------------------------------------------
            1 2 3 |   |   A   |   B   |   C   |   D   |  ...
                   ------------------------------------------
             _    | 1 |   A   |       |       |       |  ...
            |  _  | 2 |   B   |       |       |       |  ...
            | |   | 3 |  (C)  |       |       |       |  ...
            | |   | 4 |  (D)  |       |       |       |  ...
            | -   | 5 |   E   |       |       |       |  ...
            |  _  | 6 |   F   |       |       |       |  ...
            | |   | 7 |  (G)  |       |       |       |  ...
            | |   | 8 |  (H)  |       |       |       |  ...
            | -   | 9 |   I   |       |       |       |  ...
            -     | . |  ...  |  ...  |  ...  |  ...  |  ...

       Clicking the minus sign on each of the level 2 outlines will collapse and hide the data as
       shown in the next figure. The minus sign changes to a plus sign to indicate that the data
       in the outline is hidden.

                   ------------------------------------------
            1 2 3 |   |   A   |   B   |   C   |   D   |  ...
                   ------------------------------------------
             _    | 1 |   A   |       |       |       |  ...
            |     | 2 |   B   |       |       |       |  ...
            | +   | 5 |   E   |       |       |       |  ...
            |     | 6 |   F   |       |       |       |  ...
            | +   | 9 |   I   |       |       |       |  ...
            -     | . |  ...  |  ...  |  ...  |  ...  |  ...

       Clicking on the minus sign on the level 1 outline will collapse the remaining rows as
       follows:

                   ------------------------------------------
            1 2 3 |   |   A   |   B   |   C   |   D   |  ...
                   ------------------------------------------
                  | 1 |   A   |       |       |       |  ...
            +     | . |  ...  |  ...  |  ...  |  ...  |  ...

       See the main Excel::Writer::XLSX documentation for more information.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example of how use Excel::Writer::XLSX to generate Excel outlines and
           # grouping.
           #
           #
           # Excel allows you to group rows or columns so that they can be hidden or
           # displayed with a single mouse click. This feature is referred to as outlines.
           #
           # Outlines can reduce complex data down to a few salient sub-totals or
           # summaries.
           #
           # This feature is best viewed in Excel but the following is an ASCII
           # representation of what a worksheet with three outlines might look like.
           # Rows 3-4 and rows 7-8 are grouped at level 2. Rows 2-9 are grouped at
           # level 1. The lines at the left hand side are called outline level bars.
           #
           #
           #             ------------------------------------------
           #      1 2 3 |   |   A   |   B   |   C   |   D   |  ...
           #             ------------------------------------------
           #       _    | 1 |   A   |       |       |       |  ...
           #      |  _  | 2 |   B   |       |       |       |  ...
           #      | |   | 3 |  (C)  |       |       |       |  ...
           #      | |   | 4 |  (D)  |       |       |       |  ...
           #      | -   | 5 |   E   |       |       |       |  ...
           #      |  _  | 6 |   F   |       |       |       |  ...
           #      | |   | 7 |  (G)  |       |       |       |  ...
           #      | |   | 8 |  (H)  |       |       |       |  ...
           #      | -   | 9 |   I   |       |       |       |  ...
           #      -     | . |  ...  |  ...  |  ...  |  ...  |  ...
           #
           #
           # Clicking the minus sign on each of the level 2 outlines will collapse and
           # hide the data as shown in the next figure. The minus sign changes to a plus
           # sign to indicate that the data in the outline is hidden.
           #
           #             ------------------------------------------
           #      1 2 3 |   |   A   |   B   |   C   |   D   |  ...
           #             ------------------------------------------
           #       _    | 1 |   A   |       |       |       |  ...
           #      |     | 2 |   B   |       |       |       |  ...
           #      | +   | 5 |   E   |       |       |       |  ...
           #      |     | 6 |   F   |       |       |       |  ...
           #      | +   | 9 |   I   |       |       |       |  ...
           #      -     | . |  ...  |  ...  |  ...  |  ...  |  ...
           #
           #
           # Clicking on the minus sign on the level 1 outline will collapse the remaining
           # rows as follows:
           #
           #             ------------------------------------------
           #      1 2 3 |   |   A   |   B   |   C   |   D   |  ...
           #             ------------------------------------------
           #            | 1 |   A   |       |       |       |  ...
           #      +     | . |  ...  |  ...  |  ...  |  ...  |  ...
           #
           # See the main Excel::Writer::XLSX documentation for more information.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), April 2003, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           # Create a new workbook and add some worksheets
           my $workbook   = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'outline.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet1 = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'Outlined Rows' );
           my $worksheet2 = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'Collapsed Rows' );
           my $worksheet3 = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'Outline Columns' );
           my $worksheet4 = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'Outline levels' );

           # Add a general format
           my $bold = $workbook->add_format( bold => 1 );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 1: Create a worksheet with outlined rows. It also includes SUBTOTAL()
           # functions so that it looks like the type of automatic outlines that are
           # generated when you use the Excel Data->SubTotals menu item.
           #

           # For outlines the important parameters are $hidden and $level. Rows with the
           # same $level are grouped together. The group will be collapsed if $hidden is
           # non-zero. $height and $XF are assigned default values if they are undef.
           #
           # The syntax is: set_row($row, $height, $XF, $hidden, $level, $collapsed)
           #
           $worksheet1->set_row( 1, undef, undef, 0, 2 );
           $worksheet1->set_row( 2, undef, undef, 0, 2 );
           $worksheet1->set_row( 3, undef, undef, 0, 2 );
           $worksheet1->set_row( 4, undef, undef, 0, 2 );
           $worksheet1->set_row( 5, undef, undef, 0, 1 );

           $worksheet1->set_row( 6,  undef, undef, 0, 2 );
           $worksheet1->set_row( 7,  undef, undef, 0, 2 );
           $worksheet1->set_row( 8,  undef, undef, 0, 2 );
           $worksheet1->set_row( 9,  undef, undef, 0, 2 );
           $worksheet1->set_row( 10, undef, undef, 0, 1 );

           # Add a column format for clarity
           $worksheet1->set_column( 'A:A', 20 );

           # Add the data, labels and formulas
           $worksheet1->write( 'A1', 'Region', $bold );
           $worksheet1->write( 'A2', 'North' );
           $worksheet1->write( 'A3', 'North' );
           $worksheet1->write( 'A4', 'North' );
           $worksheet1->write( 'A5', 'North' );
           $worksheet1->write( 'A6', 'North Total', $bold );

           $worksheet1->write( 'B1', 'Sales', $bold );
           $worksheet1->write( 'B2', 1000 );
           $worksheet1->write( 'B3', 1200 );
           $worksheet1->write( 'B4', 900 );
           $worksheet1->write( 'B5', 1200 );
           $worksheet1->write( 'B6', '=SUBTOTAL(9,B2:B5)', $bold );

           $worksheet1->write( 'A7',  'South' );
           $worksheet1->write( 'A8',  'South' );
           $worksheet1->write( 'A9',  'South' );
           $worksheet1->write( 'A10', 'South' );
           $worksheet1->write( 'A11', 'South Total', $bold );

           $worksheet1->write( 'B7',  400 );
           $worksheet1->write( 'B8',  600 );
           $worksheet1->write( 'B9',  500 );
           $worksheet1->write( 'B10', 600 );
           $worksheet1->write( 'B11', '=SUBTOTAL(9,B7:B10)', $bold );

           $worksheet1->write( 'A12', 'Grand Total',         $bold );
           $worksheet1->write( 'B12', '=SUBTOTAL(9,B2:B10)', $bold );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 2: Create a worksheet with outlined rows. This is the same as the
           # previous example except that the rows are collapsed.
           # Note: We need to indicate the row that contains the collapsed symbol '+'
           # with the optional parameter, $collapsed.

           # The group will be collapsed if $hidden is non-zero.
           # The syntax is: set_row($row, $height, $XF, $hidden, $level, $collapsed)
           #
           $worksheet2->set_row( 1, undef, undef, 1, 2 );
           $worksheet2->set_row( 2, undef, undef, 1, 2 );
           $worksheet2->set_row( 3, undef, undef, 1, 2 );
           $worksheet2->set_row( 4, undef, undef, 1, 2 );
           $worksheet2->set_row( 5, undef, undef, 1, 1 );

           $worksheet2->set_row( 6,  undef, undef, 1, 2 );
           $worksheet2->set_row( 7,  undef, undef, 1, 2 );
           $worksheet2->set_row( 8,  undef, undef, 1, 2 );
           $worksheet2->set_row( 9,  undef, undef, 1, 2 );
           $worksheet2->set_row( 10, undef, undef, 1, 1 );
           $worksheet2->set_row( 11, undef, undef, 0, 0, 1 );

           # Add a column format for clarity
           $worksheet2->set_column( 'A:A', 20 );

           # Add the data, labels and formulas
           $worksheet2->write( 'A1', 'Region', $bold );
           $worksheet2->write( 'A2', 'North' );
           $worksheet2->write( 'A3', 'North' );
           $worksheet2->write( 'A4', 'North' );
           $worksheet2->write( 'A5', 'North' );
           $worksheet2->write( 'A6', 'North Total', $bold );

           $worksheet2->write( 'B1', 'Sales', $bold );
           $worksheet2->write( 'B2', 1000 );
           $worksheet2->write( 'B3', 1200 );
           $worksheet2->write( 'B4', 900 );
           $worksheet2->write( 'B5', 1200 );
           $worksheet2->write( 'B6', '=SUBTOTAL(9,B2:B5)', $bold );

           $worksheet2->write( 'A7',  'South' );
           $worksheet2->write( 'A8',  'South' );
           $worksheet2->write( 'A9',  'South' );
           $worksheet2->write( 'A10', 'South' );
           $worksheet2->write( 'A11', 'South Total', $bold );

           $worksheet2->write( 'B7',  400 );
           $worksheet2->write( 'B8',  600 );
           $worksheet2->write( 'B9',  500 );
           $worksheet2->write( 'B10', 600 );
           $worksheet2->write( 'B11', '=SUBTOTAL(9,B7:B10)', $bold );

           $worksheet2->write( 'A12', 'Grand Total',         $bold );
           $worksheet2->write( 'B12', '=SUBTOTAL(9,B2:B10)', $bold );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 3: Create a worksheet with outlined columns.
           #
           my $data = [
               [ 'Month', 'Jan', 'Feb', 'Mar', 'Apr', 'May', 'Jun', ' Total' ],
               [ 'North', 50,    20,    15,    25,    65,    80,    '=SUM(B2:G2)' ],
               [ 'South', 10,    20,    30,    50,    50,    50,    '=SUM(B3:G3)' ],
               [ 'East',  45,    75,    50,    15,    75,    100,   '=SUM(B4:G4)' ],
               [ 'West',  15,    15,    55,    35,    20,    50,    '=SUM(B5:G5)' ],
           ];

           # Add bold format to the first row
           $worksheet3->set_row( 0, undef, $bold );

           # Syntax: set_column($col1, $col2, $width, $XF, $hidden, $level, $collapsed)
           $worksheet3->set_column( 'A:A', 10, $bold );
           $worksheet3->set_column( 'B:G', 5, undef, 0, 1 );
           $worksheet3->set_column( 'H:H', 10 );

           # Write the data and a formula
           $worksheet3->write_col( 'A1', $data );
           $worksheet3->write( 'H6', '=SUM(H2:H5)', $bold );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 4: Show all possible outline levels.
           #
           my $levels = [
               "Level 1", "Level 2", "Level 3", "Level 4", "Level 5", "Level 6",
               "Level 7", "Level 6", "Level 5", "Level 4", "Level 3", "Level 2",
               "Level 1"
           ];

           $worksheet4->write_col( 'A1', $levels );

           $worksheet4->set_row( 0,  undef, undef, undef, 1 );
           $worksheet4->set_row( 1,  undef, undef, undef, 2 );
           $worksheet4->set_row( 2,  undef, undef, undef, 3 );
           $worksheet4->set_row( 3,  undef, undef, undef, 4 );
           $worksheet4->set_row( 4,  undef, undef, undef, 5 );
           $worksheet4->set_row( 5,  undef, undef, undef, 6 );
           $worksheet4->set_row( 6,  undef, undef, undef, 7 );
           $worksheet4->set_row( 7,  undef, undef, undef, 6 );
           $worksheet4->set_row( 8,  undef, undef, undef, 5 );
           $worksheet4->set_row( 9,  undef, undef, undef, 4 );
           $worksheet4->set_row( 10, undef, undef, undef, 3 );
           $worksheet4->set_row( 11, undef, undef, undef, 2 );
           $worksheet4->set_row( 12, undef, undef, undef, 1 );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/outline.pl>

   Example: outline_collapsed.pl
       Example of how to use Excel::Writer::XLSX to generate Excel outlines and grouping.

       These examples focus mainly on collapsed outlines. See also the outlines.pl example
       program for more general examples.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example of how to use Excel::Writer::XLSX to generate Excel outlines and
           # grouping.
           #
           # These examples focus mainly on collapsed outlines. See also the
           # outlines.pl example program for more general examples.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), March 2008, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           # Create a new workbook and add some worksheets
           my $workbook   = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'outline_collapsed.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet1 = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'Outlined Rows' );
           my $worksheet2 = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'Collapsed Rows 1' );
           my $worksheet3 = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'Collapsed Rows 2' );
           my $worksheet4 = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'Collapsed Rows 3' );
           my $worksheet5 = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'Outline Columns' );
           my $worksheet6 = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'Collapsed Columns' );

           # Add a general format
           my $bold = $workbook->add_format( bold => 1 );

           #
           # This function will generate the same data and sub-totals on each worksheet.
           #
           sub create_sub_totals {

               my $worksheet = $_[0];

               # Add a column format for clarity
               $worksheet->set_column( 'A:A', 20 );

               # Add the data, labels and formulas
               $worksheet->write( 'A1', 'Region', $bold );
               $worksheet->write( 'A2', 'North' );
               $worksheet->write( 'A3', 'North' );
               $worksheet->write( 'A4', 'North' );
               $worksheet->write( 'A5', 'North' );
               $worksheet->write( 'A6', 'North Total', $bold );

               $worksheet->write( 'B1', 'Sales', $bold );
               $worksheet->write( 'B2', 1000 );
               $worksheet->write( 'B3', 1200 );
               $worksheet->write( 'B4', 900 );
               $worksheet->write( 'B5', 1200 );
               $worksheet->write( 'B6', '=SUBTOTAL(9,B2:B5)', $bold );

               $worksheet->write( 'A7',  'South' );
               $worksheet->write( 'A8',  'South' );
               $worksheet->write( 'A9',  'South' );
               $worksheet->write( 'A10', 'South' );
               $worksheet->write( 'A11', 'South Total', $bold );

               $worksheet->write( 'B7',  400 );
               $worksheet->write( 'B8',  600 );
               $worksheet->write( 'B9',  500 );
               $worksheet->write( 'B10', 600 );
               $worksheet->write( 'B11', '=SUBTOTAL(9,B7:B10)', $bold );

               $worksheet->write( 'A12', 'Grand Total',         $bold );
               $worksheet->write( 'B12', '=SUBTOTAL(9,B2:B10)', $bold );

           }

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 1: Create a worksheet with outlined rows. It also includes SUBTOTAL()
           # functions so that it looks like the type of automatic outlines that are
           # generated when you use the Excel Data->SubTotals menu item.
           #

           # The syntax is: set_row($row, $height, $XF, $hidden, $level, $collapsed)
           $worksheet1->set_row( 1, undef, undef, 0, 2 );
           $worksheet1->set_row( 2, undef, undef, 0, 2 );
           $worksheet1->set_row( 3, undef, undef, 0, 2 );
           $worksheet1->set_row( 4, undef, undef, 0, 2 );
           $worksheet1->set_row( 5, undef, undef, 0, 1 );

           $worksheet1->set_row( 6,  undef, undef, 0, 2 );
           $worksheet1->set_row( 7,  undef, undef, 0, 2 );
           $worksheet1->set_row( 8,  undef, undef, 0, 2 );
           $worksheet1->set_row( 9,  undef, undef, 0, 2 );
           $worksheet1->set_row( 10, undef, undef, 0, 1 );

           # Write the sub-total data that is common to the row examples.
           create_sub_totals( $worksheet1 );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 2: Create a worksheet with collapsed outlined rows.
           # This is the same as the example 1  except that the all rows are collapsed.
           # Note: We need to indicate the row that contains the collapsed symbol '+' with
           # the optional parameter, $collapsed.

           $worksheet2->set_row( 1, undef, undef, 1, 2 );
           $worksheet2->set_row( 2, undef, undef, 1, 2 );
           $worksheet2->set_row( 3, undef, undef, 1, 2 );
           $worksheet2->set_row( 4, undef, undef, 1, 2 );
           $worksheet2->set_row( 5, undef, undef, 1, 1 );

           $worksheet2->set_row( 6,  undef, undef, 1, 2 );
           $worksheet2->set_row( 7,  undef, undef, 1, 2 );
           $worksheet2->set_row( 8,  undef, undef, 1, 2 );
           $worksheet2->set_row( 9,  undef, undef, 1, 2 );
           $worksheet2->set_row( 10, undef, undef, 1, 1 );

           $worksheet2->set_row( 11, undef, undef, 0, 0, 1 );

           # Write the sub-total data that is common to the row examples.
           create_sub_totals( $worksheet2 );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 3: Create a worksheet with collapsed outlined rows.
           # Same as the example 1  except that the two sub-totals are collapsed.

           $worksheet3->set_row( 1, undef, undef, 1, 2 );
           $worksheet3->set_row( 2, undef, undef, 1, 2 );
           $worksheet3->set_row( 3, undef, undef, 1, 2 );
           $worksheet3->set_row( 4, undef, undef, 1, 2 );
           $worksheet3->set_row( 5, undef, undef, 0, 1, 1 );

           $worksheet3->set_row( 6,  undef, undef, 1, 2 );
           $worksheet3->set_row( 7,  undef, undef, 1, 2 );
           $worksheet3->set_row( 8,  undef, undef, 1, 2 );
           $worksheet3->set_row( 9,  undef, undef, 1, 2 );
           $worksheet3->set_row( 10, undef, undef, 0, 1, 1 );

           # Write the sub-total data that is common to the row examples.
           create_sub_totals( $worksheet3 );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 4: Create a worksheet with outlined rows.
           # Same as the example 1  except that the two sub-totals are collapsed.

           $worksheet4->set_row( 1, undef, undef, 1, 2 );
           $worksheet4->set_row( 2, undef, undef, 1, 2 );
           $worksheet4->set_row( 3, undef, undef, 1, 2 );
           $worksheet4->set_row( 4, undef, undef, 1, 2 );
           $worksheet4->set_row( 5, undef, undef, 1, 1, 1 );

           $worksheet4->set_row( 6,  undef, undef, 1, 2 );
           $worksheet4->set_row( 7,  undef, undef, 1, 2 );
           $worksheet4->set_row( 8,  undef, undef, 1, 2 );
           $worksheet4->set_row( 9,  undef, undef, 1, 2 );
           $worksheet4->set_row( 10, undef, undef, 1, 1, 1 );

           $worksheet4->set_row( 11, undef, undef, 0, 0, 1 );

           # Write the sub-total data that is common to the row examples.
           create_sub_totals( $worksheet4 );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 5: Create a worksheet with outlined columns.
           #
           my $data = [
               [ 'Month', 'Jan', 'Feb', 'Mar', 'Apr', 'May', 'Jun', 'Total' ],
               [ 'North', 50,    20,    15,    25,    65,    80,,   '=SUM(B2:G2)' ],
               [ 'South', 10,    20,    30,    50,    50,    50,,   '=SUM(B3:G3)' ],
               [ 'East',  45,    75,    50,    15,    75,    100,,  '=SUM(B4:G4)' ],
               [ 'West',  15,    15,    55,    35,    20,    50,,   '=SUM(B5:G6)' ],
           ];

           # Add bold format to the first row
           $worksheet5->set_row( 0, undef, $bold );

           # Syntax: set_column($col1, $col2, $width, $XF, $hidden, $level, $collapsed)
           $worksheet5->set_column( 'A:A', 10, $bold );
           $worksheet5->set_column( 'B:G', 5, undef, 0, 1 );
           $worksheet5->set_column( 'H:H', 10 );

           # Write the data and a formula
           $worksheet5->write_col( 'A1', $data );
           $worksheet5->write( 'H6', '=SUM(H2:H5)', $bold );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 6: Create a worksheet with collapsed outlined columns.
           # This is the same as the previous example except collapsed columns.

           # Add bold format to the first row
           $worksheet6->set_row( 0, undef, $bold );

           # Syntax: set_column($col1, $col2, $width, $XF, $hidden, $level, $collapsed)
           $worksheet6->set_column( 'A:A', 10, $bold );
           $worksheet6->set_column( 'B:G', 5,  undef, 1, 1 );
           $worksheet6->set_column( 'H:H', 10, undef, 0, 0, 1 );

           # Write the data and a formula
           $worksheet6->write_col( 'A1', $data );
           $worksheet6->write( 'H6', '=SUM(H2:H5)', $bold );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/outline_collapsed.pl>

   Example: panes.pl
       Example of using the Excel::Writer::XLSX module to create worksheet panes.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           #######################################################################
           #
           # Example of using the Excel::Writer::XLSX module to create worksheet panes.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), May 2001, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'panes.xlsx' );

           my $worksheet1 = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'Panes 1' );
           my $worksheet2 = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'Panes 2' );
           my $worksheet3 = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'Panes 3' );
           my $worksheet4 = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'Panes 4' );

           # Freeze panes
           $worksheet1->freeze_panes( 1, 0 );    # 1 row

           $worksheet2->freeze_panes( 0, 1 );    # 1 column
           $worksheet3->freeze_panes( 1, 1 );    # 1 row and column

           # Split panes.
           # The divisions must be specified in terms of row and column dimensions.
           # The default row height is 15 and the default column width is 8.43
           #
           $worksheet4->split_panes( 15, 8.43 );    # 1 row and column

           #######################################################################
           #
           # Set up some formatting and text to highlight the panes
           #

           my $header = $workbook->add_format(
               align    => 'center',
               valign   => 'vcenter',
               fg_color => '#C3FFC0',
           );

           my $center = $workbook->add_format( align => 'center' );

           #######################################################################
           #
           # Sheet 1
           #

           $worksheet1->set_column( 'A:I', 16 );
           $worksheet1->set_row( 0, 20 );
           $worksheet1->set_selection( 'C3' );

           for my $i ( 0 .. 8 ) {
               $worksheet1->write( 0, $i, 'Scroll down', $header );
           }

           for my $i ( 1 .. 100 ) {
               for my $j ( 0 .. 8 ) {
                   $worksheet1->write( $i, $j, $i + 1, $center );
               }
           }

           #######################################################################
           #
           # Sheet 2
           #

           $worksheet2->set_column( 'A:A', 16 );
           $worksheet2->set_selection( 'C3' );

           for my $i ( 0 .. 49 ) {
               $worksheet2->set_row( $i, 15 );
               $worksheet2->write( $i, 0, 'Scroll right', $header );
           }

           for my $i ( 0 .. 49 ) {
               for my $j ( 1 .. 25 ) {
                   $worksheet2->write( $i, $j, $j, $center );
               }
           }

           #######################################################################
           #
           # Sheet 3
           #

           $worksheet3->set_column( 'A:Z', 16 );
           $worksheet3->set_selection( 'C3' );

           $worksheet3->write( 0, 0, '', $header );

           for my $i ( 1 .. 25 ) {
               $worksheet3->write( 0, $i, 'Scroll down', $header );
           }

           for my $i ( 1 .. 49 ) {
               $worksheet3->write( $i, 0, 'Scroll right', $header );
           }

           for my $i ( 1 .. 49 ) {
               for my $j ( 1 .. 25 ) {
                   $worksheet3->write( $i, $j, $j, $center );
               }
           }

           #######################################################################
           #
           # Sheet 4
           #

           $worksheet4->set_selection( 'C3' );

           for my $i ( 1 .. 25 ) {
               $worksheet4->write( 0, $i, 'Scroll', $center );
           }

           for my $i ( 1 .. 49 ) {
               $worksheet4->write( $i, 0, 'Scroll', $center );
           }

           for my $i ( 1 .. 49 ) {
               for my $j ( 1 .. 25 ) {
                   $worksheet4->write( $i, $j, $j, $center );
               }
           }

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/panes.pl>

   Example: properties.pl
       An example of adding document properties to a Excel::Writer::XLSX file.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           ##############################################################################
           #
           # An example of adding document properties to a Excel::Writer::XLSX file.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), August 2008, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'properties.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();

           $workbook->set_properties(
               title    => 'This is an example spreadsheet',
               subject  => 'With document properties',
               author   => 'John McNamara',
               manager  => 'Dr. Heinz Doofenshmirtz',
               company  => 'of Wolves',
               category => 'Example spreadsheets',
               keywords => 'Sample, Example, Properties',
               comments => 'Created with Perl and Excel::Writer::XLSX',
               status   => 'Quo',
           );

           $worksheet->set_column( 'A:A', 70 );
           $worksheet->write( 'A1', qq{Select 'Office Button -> Prepare -> Properties' to see the file properties.} );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/properties.pl>

   Example: protection.pl
       Example of cell locking and formula hiding in an Excel worksheet via the
       Excel::Writer::XLSX module.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           ########################################################################
           #
           # Example of cell locking and formula hiding in an Excel worksheet via
           # the Excel::Writer::XLSX module.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), August 2001, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'protection.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();

           # Create some format objects
           my $unlocked = $workbook->add_format( locked => 0 );
           my $hidden   = $workbook->add_format( hidden => 1 );

           # Format the columns
           $worksheet->set_column( 'A:A', 45 );
           $worksheet->set_selection( 'B3' );

           # Protect the worksheet
           $worksheet->protect();

           # Examples of cell locking and hiding.
           $worksheet->write( 'A1', 'Cell B1 is locked. It cannot be edited.' );
           $worksheet->write_formula( 'B1', '=1+2', undef, 3 );    # Locked by default.

           $worksheet->write( 'A2', 'Cell B2 is unlocked. It can be edited.' );
           $worksheet->write_formula( 'B2', '=1+2', $unlocked, 3 );

           $worksheet->write( 'A3', "Cell B3 is hidden. The formula isn't visible." );
           $worksheet->write_formula( 'B3', '=1+2', $hidden, 3 );

           $worksheet->write( 'A5', 'Use Menu->Tools->Protection->Unprotect Sheet' );
           $worksheet->write( 'A6', 'to remove the worksheet protection.' );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/protection.pl>

   Example: rich_strings.pl
       An Excel::Writer::XLSX example showing how to use "rich strings", i.e., strings with
       multiple formatting.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           #######################################################################
           #
           # An Excel::Writer::XLSX example showing how to use "rich strings", i.e.,
           # strings with multiple formatting.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), February 2011, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'rich_strings.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();

           $worksheet->set_column( 'A:A', 30 );

           # Set some formats to use.
           my $bold   = $workbook->add_format( bold        => 1 );
           my $italic = $workbook->add_format( italic      => 1 );
           my $red    = $workbook->add_format( color       => 'red' );
           my $blue   = $workbook->add_format( color       => 'blue' );
           my $center = $workbook->add_format( align       => 'center' );
           my $super  = $workbook->add_format( font_script => 1 );

           # Write some strings with multiple formats.
           $worksheet->write_rich_string( 'A1',
               'This is ', $bold, 'bold', ' and this is ', $italic, 'italic' );

           $worksheet->write_rich_string( 'A3',
               'This is ', $red, 'red', ' and this is ', $blue, 'blue' );

           $worksheet->write_rich_string( 'A5',
               'Some ', $bold, 'bold text', ' centered', $center );

           $worksheet->write_rich_string( 'A7',
               $italic, 'j = k', $super, '(n-1)', $center );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/rich_strings.pl>

   Example: right_to_left.pl
       Example of how to change the default worksheet direction from left-to-right to right-to-
       left as required by some eastern verions of Excel.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           #######################################################################
           #
           # Example of how to change the default worksheet direction from
           # left-to-right to right-to-left as required by some eastern verions
           # of Excel.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), January 2006, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook   = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'right_to_left.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet1 = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $worksheet2 = $workbook->add_worksheet();

           $worksheet2->right_to_left();

           $worksheet1->write( 0, 0, 'Hello' );    #  A1, B1, C1, ...
           $worksheet2->write( 0, 0, 'Hello' );    # ..., C1, B1, A1

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/right_to_left.pl>

   Example: sales.pl
       Example of a sales worksheet to demonstrate several different features.  Also uses
       functions from the Excel::Writer::XLSX::Utility module.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl -w

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example of a sales worksheet to demonstrate several different features.
           # Also uses functions from the L<Excel::Writer::XLSX::Utility> module.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), October 2001, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX::Utility;

           # Create a new workbook and add a worksheet
           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'sales.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'May Sales' );

           # Set up some formats
           my %heading = (
               bold     => 1,
               pattern  => 1,
               fg_color => '#C3FFC0',
               border   => 1,
               align    => 'center',
           );

           my %total = (
               bold       => 1,
               top        => 1,
               num_format => '$#,##0.00'
           );

           my $heading      = $workbook->add_format( %heading );
           my $total_format = $workbook->add_format( %total );
           my $price_format = $workbook->add_format( num_format => '$#,##0.00' );
           my $date_format  = $workbook->add_format( num_format => 'mmm d yyy' );

           # Write the main headings
           $worksheet->freeze_panes( 1 );    # Freeze the first row
           $worksheet->write( 'A1', 'Item',     $heading );
           $worksheet->write( 'B1', 'Quantity', $heading );
           $worksheet->write( 'C1', 'Price',    $heading );
           $worksheet->write( 'D1', 'Total',    $heading );
           $worksheet->write( 'E1', 'Date',     $heading );

           # Set the column widths
           $worksheet->set_column( 'A:A', 25 );
           $worksheet->set_column( 'B:B', 10 );
           $worksheet->set_column( 'C:E', 16 );

           # Extract the sales data from the __DATA__ section at the end of the file.
           # In reality this information would probably come from a database
           my @sales;

           foreach my $line ( <DATA> ) {
               chomp $line;
               next if $line eq '';

               # Simple-minded processing of CSV data. Refer to the Text::CSV_XS
               # and Text::xSV modules for a more complete CSV handling.
               my @items = split /,/, $line;
               push @sales, \@items;
           }

           # Write out the items from each row
           my $row = 1;
           foreach my $sale ( @sales ) {

               $worksheet->write( $row, 0, @$sale[0] );
               $worksheet->write( $row, 1, @$sale[1] );
               $worksheet->write( $row, 2, @$sale[2], $price_format );

               # Create a formula like '=B2*C2'
               my $formula =
                 '=' . xl_rowcol_to_cell( $row, 1 ) . "*" . xl_rowcol_to_cell( $row, 2 );

               $worksheet->write( $row, 3, $formula, $price_format );

               # Parse the date
               my $date = xl_decode_date_US( @$sale[3] );
               $worksheet->write( $row, 4, $date, $date_format );
               $row++;
           }

           # Create a formula to sum the totals, like '=SUM(D2:D6)'
           my $total = '=SUM(D2:' . xl_rowcol_to_cell( $row - 1, 3 ) . ")";

           $worksheet->write( $row, 3, $total, $total_format );

           $workbook->close();

           __DATA__
           586 card,20,125.50,5/12/01
           Flat Screen Monitor,1,1300.00,5/12/01
           64 MB dimms,45,49.99,5/13/01
           15 GB HD,12,300.00,5/13/01
           Speakers (pair),5,15.50,5/14/01

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/sales.pl>

   Example: shape1.pl
       A simple example of how to use the Excel::Writer::XLSX module to add shapes to an Excel
       xlsx file.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           #######################################################################
           #
           # A simple example of how to use the Excel::Writer::XLSX module to
           # add shapes to an Excel xlsx file.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), May 2012, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'shape1.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();

           # Add a circle, with centered text.
           my $ellipse = $workbook->add_shape(
               type   => 'ellipse',
               text   => "Hello\nWorld",
               width  => 60,
               height => 60
           );

           $worksheet->insert_shape( 'A1', $ellipse, 50, 50 );

           # Add a plus sign.
           my $plus = $workbook->add_shape( type => 'plus', width => 20, height => 20 );
           $worksheet->insert_shape( 'D8', $plus );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/shape1.pl>

   Example: shape2.pl
       A simple example of how to use the Excel::Writer::XLSX module to modify shape properties
       in an Excel xlsx file.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           #######################################################################
           #
           # A simple example of how to use the Excel::Writer::XLSX module to
           # modify shape properties in an Excel xlsx file.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), May 2012, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'shape2.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();

           $worksheet->hide_gridlines( 2 );

           my $plain = $workbook->add_shape(
               type   => 'smileyFace',
               text   => "Plain",
               width  => 100,
               height => 100,
           );

           my $bbformat = $workbook->add_format(
               color => 'red',
               font  => 'Lucida Calligraphy',
           );

           $bbformat->set_bold();
           $bbformat->set_underline();
           $bbformat->set_italic();

           my $decor = $workbook->add_shape(
               type        => 'smileyFace',
               text        => "Decorated",
               rotation    => 45,
               width       => 200,
               height      => 100,
               format      => $bbformat,
               line_type   => 'sysDot',
               line_weight => 3,
               fill        => 'FFFF00',
               line        => '3366FF',
           );

           $worksheet->insert_shape( 'A1', $plain, 50,  50 );
           $worksheet->insert_shape( 'A1', $decor, 250, 50 );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/shape2.pl>

   Example: shape3.pl
       A simple example of how to use the Excel::Writer::XLSX module to scale shapes in an Excel
       xlsx file.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           #######################################################################
           #
           # A simple example of how to use the Excel::Writer::XLSX module to
           # scale shapes in an Excel xlsx file.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), May 2012, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'shape3.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();

           my $normal = $workbook->add_shape(
               name   => 'chip',
               type   => 'diamond',
               text   => "Normal",
               width  => 100,
               height => 100,
           );

           $worksheet->insert_shape( 'A1', $normal, 50, 50 );
           $normal->set_text( 'Scaled 3w x 2h' );
           $normal->set_name( 'Hope' );
           $worksheet->insert_shape( 'A1', $normal, 250, 50, 3, 2 );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/shape3.pl>

   Example: shape4.pl
       A simple example of how to use the Excel::Writer::XLSX module to demonstrate stenciling in
       an Excel xlsx file.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           #######################################################################
           #
           # A simple example of how to use the Excel::Writer::XLSX module to
           # demonstrate stenciling in an Excel xlsx file.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), May 2012, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'shape4.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();

           $worksheet->hide_gridlines( 2 );

           my $type  = 'rect';
           my $shape = $workbook->add_shape(
               type   => $type,
               width  => 90,
               height => 90,
           );

           for my $n ( 1 .. 10 ) {

               # Change the last 5 rectangles to stars. Previously inserted shapes stay
               # as rectangles.
               $type = 'star5' if $n == 6;
               $shape->set_type( $type );
               $shape->set_text( "$type $n" );
               $worksheet->insert_shape( 'A1', $shape, $n * 100, 50 );
           }

           my $stencil = $workbook->add_shape(
               stencil => 1,                    # The default.
               width   => 90,
               height  => 90,
               text    => 'started as a box',
           );
           $worksheet->insert_shape( 'A1', $stencil, 100, 150 );

           $stencil->set_stencil( 0 );
           $worksheet->insert_shape( 'A1', $stencil, 200, 150 );
           $worksheet->insert_shape( 'A1', $stencil, 300, 150 );

           # Ooops!  Changed my mind.  Change the rectangle to an ellipse (circle),
           # for the last two shapes.
           $stencil->set_type( 'ellipse' );
           $stencil->set_text( 'Now its a circle' );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/shape4.pl>

   Example: shape5.pl
       A simple example of how to use the Excel::Writer::XLSX module to add shapes (objects and
       top/bottom connectors) to an Excel xlsx file.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           #######################################################################
           #
           # A simple example of how to use the Excel::Writer::XLSX module to
           # add shapes (objects and top/bottom connectors) to an Excel xlsx file.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), May 2012, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'shape5.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();

           my $s1 = $workbook->add_shape( type => 'ellipse', width => 60, height => 60 );
           $worksheet->insert_shape( 'A1', $s1, 50, 50 );

           my $s2 = $workbook->add_shape( type => 'plus', width => 20, height => 20 );
           $worksheet->insert_shape( 'A1', $s2, 250, 200 );

           # Create a connector to link the two shapes.
           my $cxn_shape = $workbook->add_shape( type => 'bentConnector3' );

           # Link the start of the connector to the right side.
           $cxn_shape->set_start( $s1->get_id() );
           $cxn_shape->set_start_index( 4 );  # 4th connection pt, clockwise from top(0).
           $cxn_shape->set_start_side( 'b' ); # r)ight or b)ottom.

           # Link the end of the connector to the left side.
           $cxn_shape->set_end( $s2->get_id() );
           $cxn_shape->set_end_index( 0 );     # clockwise from top(0).
           $cxn_shape->set_end_side( 't' );    # t)top.

           $worksheet->insert_shape( 'A1', $cxn_shape, 0, 0 );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/shape5.pl>

   Example: shape6.pl
       A simple example of how to use the Excel::Writer::XLSX module to add shapes (objects and
       right/left connectors) to an Excel xlsx file.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           #######################################################################
           #
           # A simple example of how to use the Excel::Writer::XLSX module to
           # add shapes (objects and right/left connectors) to an Excel xlsx file.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), May 2012, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'shape6.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();

           my $s1 = $workbook->add_shape( type => 'chevron', width => 60, height => 60 );
           $worksheet->insert_shape( 'A1', $s1, 50, 50 );

           my $s2 = $workbook->add_shape( type => 'pentagon', width => 20, height => 20 );
           $worksheet->insert_shape( 'A1', $s2, 250, 200 );

           # Create a connector to link the two shapes.
           my $cxn_shape = $workbook->add_shape( type => 'curvedConnector3' );

           # Link the start of the connector to the right side.
           $cxn_shape->set_start( $s1->get_id() );
           $cxn_shape->set_start_index( 2 );    # 2nd connection pt, clockwise from top(0).
           $cxn_shape->set_start_side( 'r' );   # r)ight or b)ottom.

           # Link the end of the connector to the left side.
           $cxn_shape->set_end( $s2->get_id() );
           $cxn_shape->set_end_index( 4 );      # 4th connection pt, clockwise from top(0).
           $cxn_shape->set_end_side( 'l' );     # l)eft or t)op.

           $worksheet->insert_shape( 'A1', $cxn_shape, 0, 0 );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/shape6.pl>

   Example: shape7.pl
       A simple example of how to use the Excel::Writer::XLSX module to add shapes and one-to-
       many connectors to an Excel xlsx file.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           #######################################################################
           #
           # A simple example of how to use the Excel::Writer::XLSX module to
           # add shapes and one-to-many connectors to an Excel xlsx file.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), May 2012, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'shape7.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();

           # Add a circle, with centered text. c is for circle, not center.
           my $cw = 60;
           my $ch = 60;
           my $cx = 210;
           my $cy = 190;

           my $ellipse = $workbook->add_shape(
               type   => 'ellipse',
               id     => 2,
               text   => "Hello\nWorld",
               width  => $cw,
               height => $ch
           );
           $worksheet->insert_shape( 'A1', $ellipse, $cx, $cy );

           # Add a plus sign at 4 different positions around the circle.
           my $pw = 20;
           my $ph = 20;
           my $px = 120;
           my $py = 250;
           my $plus =
             $workbook->add_shape( type => 'plus', id => 3, width => $pw, height => $ph );
           my $p1 = $worksheet->insert_shape( 'A1', $plus, 350, 350 );
           my $p2 = $worksheet->insert_shape( 'A1', $plus, 150, 350 );
           my $p3 = $worksheet->insert_shape( 'A1', $plus, 350, 150 );
           $plus->set_adjustments( 35 );    # change shape of plus symbol.
           my $p4 = $worksheet->insert_shape( 'A1', $plus, 150, 150 );

           my $cxn_shape = $workbook->add_shape( type => 'bentConnector3', fill => 0 );

           $cxn_shape->set_start( $ellipse->get_id() );
           $cxn_shape->set_start_index( 4 );    # 4nd connection pt, clockwise from top(0).
           $cxn_shape->set_start_side( 'b' );   # r)ight or b)ottom.

           $cxn_shape->set_end( $p1->get_id() );
           $cxn_shape->set_end_index( 0 );
           $cxn_shape->set_end_side( 't' );
           $worksheet->insert_shape( 'A1', $cxn_shape, 0, 0 );

           $cxn_shape->set_end( $p2->get_id() );
           $worksheet->insert_shape( 'A1', $cxn_shape, 0, 0 );

           $cxn_shape->set_end( $p3->get_id() );
           $worksheet->insert_shape( 'A1', $cxn_shape, 0, 0 );

           $cxn_shape->set_end( $p4->get_id() );
           $cxn_shape->set_adjustments( -50, 45, 120 );
           $worksheet->insert_shape( 'A1', $cxn_shape, 0, 0 );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/shape7.pl>

   Example: shape8.pl
       A simple example of how to use the Excel::Writer::XLSX module to add shapes and one-to-
       many connectors to an Excel xlsx file.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           #######################################################################
           #
           # A simple example of how to use the Excel::Writer::XLSX module to
           # add shapes and one-to-many connectors to an Excel xlsx file.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), May 2012, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'shape8.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();

           # Add a circle, with centered text. c is for circle, not center.
           my $cw = 60;
           my $ch = 60;
           my $cx = 210;
           my $cy = 190;

           my $ellipse = $workbook->add_shape(
               type   => 'ellipse',
               id     => 2,
               text   => "Hello\nWorld",
               width  => $cw,
               height => $ch
           );
           $worksheet->insert_shape( 'A1', $ellipse, $cx, $cy );

           # Add a plus sign at 4 different positions around the circle.
           my $pw = 20;
           my $ph = 20;
           my $px = 120;
           my $py = 250;
           my $plus =
             $workbook->add_shape( type => 'plus', id => 3, width => $pw, height => $ph );
           my $p1 = $worksheet->insert_shape( 'A1', $plus, 350, 150 );    #  2:00
           my $p2 = $worksheet->insert_shape( 'A1', $plus, 350, 350 );    #  4:00
           my $p3 = $worksheet->insert_shape( 'A1', $plus, 150, 350 );    #  8:00
           my $p4 = $worksheet->insert_shape( 'A1', $plus, 150, 150 );    # 10:00

           my $cxn_shape = $workbook->add_shape( type => 'bentConnector3', fill => 0 );

           $cxn_shape->set_start( $ellipse->get_id() );
           $cxn_shape->set_start_index( 2 );    # 2nd connection pt, clockwise from top(0).
           $cxn_shape->set_start_side( 'r' );   # r)ight or b)ottom.

           $cxn_shape->set_end( $p1->get_id() );
           $cxn_shape->set_end_index( 3 );      # 3rd connection point on plus, right side
           $cxn_shape->set_end_side( 'l' );
           $worksheet->insert_shape( 'A1', $cxn_shape, 0, 0 );

           $cxn_shape->set_end( $p2->get_id() );
           $worksheet->insert_shape( 'A1', $cxn_shape, 0, 0 );

           $cxn_shape->set_end( $p3->get_id() );
           $worksheet->insert_shape( 'A1', $cxn_shape, 0, 0 );

           $cxn_shape->set_end( $p4->get_id() );
           $cxn_shape->set_adjustments( -50, 45, 120 );
           $worksheet->insert_shape( 'A1', $cxn_shape, 0, 0 );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/shape8.pl>

   Example: shape_all.pl
       A simple example of how to use the Excel::Writer::XLSX module to add all shapes (as
       currently implemented) to an Excel xlsx file.

       The list at the end consists of all the shape types defined as ST_ShapeType in ECMA-376,
       Office Open XML File Formats Part 4.

       The grouping by worksheet name is for illustration only. It isn't part of the ECMA-376
       standard.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           #######################################################################
           #
           # A simple example of how to use the Excel::Writer::XLSX module to
           # add all shapes (as currently implemented) to an Excel xlsx file.
           #
           # The list at the end consists of all the shape types defined as
           # ST_ShapeType in ECMA-376, Office Open XML File Formats Part 4.
           #
           # The grouping by worksheet name is for illustration only. It isn't
           # part of the ECMA-376 standard.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), May 2012, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'shape_all.xlsx' );

           my ( $worksheet, $last_sheet, $shape, $r ) = ( 0, '', '', undef, 0 );

           while ( <DATA> ) {
               chomp;
               next unless m/^\w/;    # Skip blank lines and comments.

               my ( $sheet, $name ) = split( /\t/, $_ );
               if ( $last_sheet ne $sheet ) {
                   $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet( $sheet );
                   $r         = 2;
               }
               $last_sheet = $sheet;
               $shape      = $workbook->add_shape(
                   type   => $name,
                   text   => $name,
                   width  => 90,
                   height => 90
               );

               # Connectors can not have labels, so write the connector name in the cell
               # to the left.
               $worksheet->write( $r, 0, $name ) if $sheet eq 'Connector';
               $worksheet->insert_shape( $r, 2, $shape, 0, 0 );
               $r += 5;
           }

           $workbook->close();

           __END__
           Action      actionButtonBackPrevious
           Action      actionButtonBeginning
           Action      actionButtonBlank
           Action      actionButtonDocument
           Action      actionButtonEnd
           Action      actionButtonForwardNext
           Action      actionButtonHelp
           Action      actionButtonHome
           Action      actionButtonInformation
           Action      actionButtonMovie
           Action      actionButtonReturn
           Action      actionButtonSound
           Arrow       bentArrow
           Arrow       bentUpArrow
           Arrow       circularArrow
           Arrow       curvedDownArrow
           Arrow       curvedLeftArrow
           Arrow       curvedRightArrow
           Arrow       curvedUpArrow
           Arrow       downArrow
           Arrow       leftArrow
           Arrow       leftCircularArrow
           Arrow       leftRightArrow
           Arrow       leftRightCircularArrow
           Arrow       leftRightUpArrow
           Arrow       leftUpArrow
           Arrow       notchedRightArrow
           Arrow       quadArrow
           Arrow       rightArrow
           Arrow       stripedRightArrow
           Arrow       swooshArrow
           Arrow       upArrow
           Arrow       upDownArrow
           Arrow       uturnArrow
           Basic       blockArc
           Basic       can
           Basic       chevron
           Basic       cube
           Basic       decagon
           Basic       diamond
           Basic       dodecagon
           Basic       donut
           Basic       ellipse
           Basic       funnel
           Basic       gear6
           Basic       gear9
           Basic       heart
           Basic       heptagon
           Basic       hexagon
           Basic       homePlate
           Basic       lightningBolt
           Basic       line
           Basic       lineInv
           Basic       moon
           Basic       nonIsoscelesTrapezoid
           Basic       noSmoking
           Basic       octagon
           Basic       parallelogram
           Basic       pentagon
           Basic       pie
           Basic       pieWedge
           Basic       plaque
           Basic       rect
           Basic       round1Rect
           Basic       round2DiagRect
           Basic       round2SameRect
           Basic       roundRect
           Basic       rtTriangle
           Basic       smileyFace
           Basic       snip1Rect
           Basic       snip2DiagRect
           Basic       snip2SameRect
           Basic       snipRoundRect
           Basic       star10
           Basic       star12
           Basic       star16
           Basic       star24
           Basic       star32
           Basic       star4
           Basic       star5
           Basic       star6
           Basic       star7
           Basic       star8
           Basic       sun
           Basic       teardrop
           Basic       trapezoid
           Basic       triangle
           Callout     accentBorderCallout1
           Callout     accentBorderCallout2
           Callout     accentBorderCallout3
           Callout     accentCallout1
           Callout     accentCallout2
           Callout     accentCallout3
           Callout     borderCallout1
           Callout     borderCallout2
           Callout     borderCallout3
           Callout     callout1
           Callout     callout2
           Callout     callout3
           Callout     cloudCallout
           Callout     downArrowCallout
           Callout     leftArrowCallout
           Callout     leftRightArrowCallout
           Callout     quadArrowCallout
           Callout     rightArrowCallout
           Callout     upArrowCallout
           Callout     upDownArrowCallout
           Callout     wedgeEllipseCallout
           Callout     wedgeRectCallout
           Callout     wedgeRoundRectCallout
           Chart       chartPlus
           Chart       chartStar
           Chart       chartX
           Connector   bentConnector2
           Connector   bentConnector3
           Connector   bentConnector4
           Connector   bentConnector5
           Connector   curvedConnector2
           Connector   curvedConnector3
           Connector   curvedConnector4
           Connector   curvedConnector5
           Connector   straightConnector1
           FlowChart   flowChartAlternateProcess
           FlowChart   flowChartCollate
           FlowChart   flowChartConnector
           FlowChart   flowChartDecision
           FlowChart   flowChartDelay
           FlowChart   flowChartDisplay
           FlowChart   flowChartDocument
           FlowChart   flowChartExtract
           FlowChart   flowChartInputOutput
           FlowChart   flowChartInternalStorage
           FlowChart   flowChartMagneticDisk
           FlowChart   flowChartMagneticDrum
           FlowChart   flowChartMagneticTape
           FlowChart   flowChartManualInput
           FlowChart   flowChartManualOperation
           FlowChart   flowChartMerge
           FlowChart   flowChartMultidocument
           FlowChart   flowChartOfflineStorage
           FlowChart   flowChartOffpageConnector
           FlowChart   flowChartOnlineStorage
           FlowChart   flowChartOr
           FlowChart   flowChartPredefinedProcess
           FlowChart   flowChartPreparation
           FlowChart   flowChartProcess
           FlowChart   flowChartPunchedCard
           FlowChart   flowChartPunchedTape
           FlowChart   flowChartSort
           FlowChart   flowChartSummingJunction
           FlowChart   flowChartTerminator
           Math        mathDivide
           Math        mathEqual
           Math        mathMinus
           Math        mathMultiply
           Math        mathNotEqual
           Math        mathPlus
           Star_Banner arc
           Star_Banner bevel
           Star_Banner bracePair
           Star_Banner bracketPair
           Star_Banner chord
           Star_Banner cloud
           Star_Banner corner
           Star_Banner diagStripe
           Star_Banner doubleWave
           Star_Banner ellipseRibbon
           Star_Banner ellipseRibbon2
           Star_Banner foldedCorner
           Star_Banner frame
           Star_Banner halfFrame
           Star_Banner horizontalScroll
           Star_Banner irregularSeal1
           Star_Banner irregularSeal2
           Star_Banner leftBrace
           Star_Banner leftBracket
           Star_Banner leftRightRibbon
           Star_Banner plus
           Star_Banner ribbon
           Star_Banner ribbon2
           Star_Banner rightBrace
           Star_Banner rightBracket
           Star_Banner verticalScroll
           Star_Banner wave
           Tabs        cornerTabs
           Tabs        plaqueTabs
           Tabs        squareTabs

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/shape_all.pl>

   Example: sparklines1.pl
       Example of how to add sparklines to an Excel::Writer::XLSX file.

       Sparklines are small charts that fit in a single cell and are used to show trends in data.
       See sparklines2.pl for examples of more complex sparkline formatting.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example of how to add sparklines to an Excel::Writer::XLSX file.
           #
           # Sparklines are small charts that fit in a single cell and are
           # used to show trends in data. See sparklines2.pl for examples
           # of more complex sparkline formatting.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), November 2011, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'sparklines1.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();

           # Some sample data to plot.
           my $data = [

               [ -2, 2,  3,  -1, 0 ],
               [ 30, 20, 33, 20, 15 ],
               [ 1,  -1, -1, 1,  -1 ],

           ];

           # Write the sample data to the worksheet.
           $worksheet->write_col( 'A1', $data );

           # Add a line sparkline (the default) with markers.
           $worksheet->add_sparkline(
               {
                   location => 'F1',
                   range    => 'Sheet1!A1:E1',
                   markers  => 1,
               }
           );

           # Add a column sparkline with non-default style.
           $worksheet->add_sparkline(
               {
                   location => 'F2',
                   range    => 'Sheet1!A2:E2',
                   type     => 'column',
                   style    => 12,
               }
           );

           # Add a win/loss sparkline with negative values highlighted.
           $worksheet->add_sparkline(
               {
                   location        => 'F3',
                   range           => 'Sheet1!A3:E3',
                   type            => 'win_loss',
                   negative_points => 1,
               }
           );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/sparklines1.pl>

   Example: sparklines2.pl
       Example of how to add sparklines to an Excel::Writer::XLSX file.

       Sparklines are small charts that fit in a single cell and are used to show trends in data.
       This example shows the majority of options that can be applied to sparklines.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example of how to add sparklines to an Excel::Writer::XLSX file.
           #
           # Sparklines are small charts that fit in a single cell and are
           # used to show trends in data. This example shows the majority of
           # options that can be applied to sparklines.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), November 2011, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook    = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'sparklines2.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet1  = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $worksheet2  = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $bold        = $workbook->add_format( bold => 1 );
           my $str;
           my $row = 1;

           # Set the columns widths to make the output clearer.
           $worksheet1->set_column( 'A:A', 14 );
           $worksheet1->set_column( 'B:B', 50 );
           $worksheet1->set_zoom( 150 );

           # Headings.
           $worksheet1->write( 'A1', 'Sparkline',   $bold );
           $worksheet1->write( 'B1', 'Description', $bold );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           $str = 'A default "line" sparkline.';

           $worksheet1->add_sparkline(
               {
                   location => 'A2',
                   range    => 'Sheet2!A1:J1',
               }
           );

           $worksheet1->write( $row++, 1, $str );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           $str = 'A default "column" sparkline.';

           $worksheet1->add_sparkline(
               {
                   location => 'A3',
                   range    => 'Sheet2!A2:J2',
                   type     => 'column',
               }
           );

           $worksheet1->write( $row++, 1, $str );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           $str = 'A default "win/loss" sparkline.';

           $worksheet1->add_sparkline(
               {
                   location => 'A4',
                   range    => 'Sheet2!A3:J3',
                   type     => 'win_loss',
               }
           );

           $worksheet1->write( $row++, 1, $str );
           $row++;

           ###############################################################################
           #
           $str = 'Line with markers.';

           $worksheet1->add_sparkline(
               {
                   location => 'A6',
                   range    => 'Sheet2!A1:J1',
                   markers  => 1,
               }
           );

           $worksheet1->write( $row++, 1, $str );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           $str = 'Line with high and low points.';

           $worksheet1->add_sparkline(
               {
                   location   => 'A7',
                   range      => 'Sheet2!A1:J1',
                   high_point => 1,
                   low_point  => 1,
               }
           );

           $worksheet1->write( $row++, 1, $str );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           $str = 'Line with first and last point markers.';

           $worksheet1->add_sparkline(
               {
                   location    => 'A8',
                   range       => 'Sheet2!A1:J1',
                   first_point => 1,
                   last_point  => 1,
               }
           );

           $worksheet1->write( $row++, 1, $str );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           $str = 'Line with negative point markers.';

           $worksheet1->add_sparkline(
               {
                   location        => 'A9',
                   range           => 'Sheet2!A1:J1',
                   negative_points => 1,
               }
           );

           $worksheet1->write( $row++, 1, $str );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           $str = 'Line with axis.';

           $worksheet1->add_sparkline(
               {
                   location => 'A10',
                   range    => 'Sheet2!A1:J1',
                   axis     => 1,
               }
           );

           $worksheet1->write( $row++, 1, $str );
           $row++;

           ###############################################################################
           #
           $str = 'Column with default style (1).';

           $worksheet1->add_sparkline(
               {
                   location => 'A12',
                   range    => 'Sheet2!A2:J2',
                   type     => 'column',
               }
           );

           $worksheet1->write( $row++, 1, $str );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           $str = 'Column with style 2.';

           $worksheet1->add_sparkline(
               {
                   location => 'A13',
                   range    => 'Sheet2!A2:J2',
                   type     => 'column',
                   style    => 2,
               }
           );

           $worksheet1->write( $row++, 1, $str );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           $str = 'Column with style 3.';

           $worksheet1->add_sparkline(
               {
                   location => 'A14',
                   range    => 'Sheet2!A2:J2',
                   type     => 'column',
                   style    => 3,
               }
           );

           $worksheet1->write( $row++, 1, $str );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           $str = 'Column with style 4.';

           $worksheet1->add_sparkline(
               {
                   location => 'A15',
                   range    => 'Sheet2!A2:J2',
                   type     => 'column',
                   style    => 4,
               }
           );

           $worksheet1->write( $row++, 1, $str );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           $str = 'Column with style 5.';

           $worksheet1->add_sparkline(
               {
                   location => 'A16',
                   range    => 'Sheet2!A2:J2',
                   type     => 'column',
                   style    => 5,
               }
           );

           $worksheet1->write( $row++, 1, $str );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           $str = 'Column with style 6.';

           $worksheet1->add_sparkline(
               {
                   location => 'A17',
                   range    => 'Sheet2!A2:J2',
                   type     => 'column',
                   style    => 6,
               }
           );

           $worksheet1->write( $row++, 1, $str );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           $str = 'Column with a user defined colour.';

           $worksheet1->add_sparkline(
               {
                   location     => 'A18',
                   range        => 'Sheet2!A2:J2',
                   type         => 'column',
                   series_color => '#E965E0',
               }
           );

           $worksheet1->write( $row++, 1, $str );
           $row++;

           ###############################################################################
           #
           $str = 'A win/loss sparkline.';

           $worksheet1->add_sparkline(
               {
                   location => 'A20',
                   range    => 'Sheet2!A3:J3',
                   type     => 'win_loss',
               }
           );

           $worksheet1->write( $row++, 1, $str );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           $str = 'A win/loss sparkline with negative points highlighted.';

           $worksheet1->add_sparkline(
               {
                   location        => 'A21',
                   range           => 'Sheet2!A3:J3',
                   type            => 'win_loss',
                   negative_points => 1,
               }
           );

           $worksheet1->write( $row++, 1, $str );
           $row++;

           ###############################################################################
           #
           $str = 'A left to right column (the default).';

           $worksheet1->add_sparkline(
               {
                   location => 'A23',
                   range    => 'Sheet2!A4:J4',
                   type     => 'column',
                   style    => 20,
               }
           );

           $worksheet1->write( $row++, 1, $str );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           $str = 'A right to left column.';

           $worksheet1->add_sparkline(
               {
                   location => 'A24',
                   range    => 'Sheet2!A4:J4',
                   type     => 'column',
                   style    => 20,
                   reverse  => 1,
               }
           );

           $worksheet1->write( $row++, 1, $str );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           $str = 'Sparkline and text in one cell.';

           $worksheet1->add_sparkline(
               {
                   location => 'A25',
                   range    => 'Sheet2!A4:J4',
                   type     => 'column',
                   style    => 20,
               }
           );

           $worksheet1->write( $row,   0, 'Growth' );
           $worksheet1->write( $row++, 1, $str );
           $row++;

           ###############################################################################
           #
           $str = 'A grouped sparkline. Changes are applied to all three.';

           $worksheet1->add_sparkline(
               {
                   location => [ 'A27',          'A28',          'A29' ],
                   range    => [ 'Sheet2!A5:J5', 'Sheet2!A6:J6', 'Sheet2!A7:J7' ],
                   markers  => 1,
               }
           );

           $worksheet1->write( $row++, 1, $str );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Create a second worksheet with data to plot.
           #

           $worksheet2->set_column( 'A:J', 11 );

           my $data = [

               # Simple line data.
               [ -2, 2, 3, -1, 0, -2, 3, 2, 1, 0 ],

               # Simple column data.
               [ 30, 20, 33, 20, 15, 5, 5, 15, 10, 15 ],

               # Simple win/loss data.
               [ 1, 1, -1, -1, 1, -1, 1, 1, 1, -1 ],

               # Unbalanced histogram.
               [ 5, 6, 7, 10, 15, 20, 30, 50, 70, 100 ],

               # Data for the grouped sparkline example.
               [ -2, 2,  3, -1, 0, -2, 3, 2, 1, 0 ],
               [ 3,  -1, 0, -2, 3, 2,  1, 0, 2, 1 ],
               [ 0,  -2, 3, 2,  1, 0,  1, 2, 3, 1 ],

           ];

           # Write the sample data to the worksheet.
           $worksheet2->write_col( 'A1', $data );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/sparklines2.pl>

   Example: stats_ext.pl
       Example of formatting using the Excel::Writer::XLSX module

       This is a simple example of how to use functions that reference cells in other worksheets
       within the same workbook.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl -w

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example of formatting using the Excel::Writer::XLSX module
           #
           # This is a simple example of how to use functions that reference cells in
           # other worksheets within the same workbook.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), March 2001, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           # Create a new workbook and add a worksheet
           my $workbook   = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'stats_ext.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet1 = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'Test results' );
           my $worksheet2 = $workbook->add_worksheet( 'Data' );

           # Set the column width for columns 1
           $worksheet1->set_column( 'A:A', 20 );

           # Create a format for the headings
           my $heading = $workbook->add_format();
           $heading->set_bold();

           # Create a numerical format
           my $numformat = $workbook->add_format();
           $numformat->set_num_format( '0.00' );

           # Write some statistical functions
           $worksheet1->write( 'A1', 'Count', $heading );
           $worksheet1->write( 'B1', '=COUNT(Data!B2:B9)' );

           $worksheet1->write( 'A2', 'Sum', $heading );
           $worksheet1->write( 'B2', '=SUM(Data!B2:B9)' );

           $worksheet1->write( 'A3', 'Average', $heading );
           $worksheet1->write( 'B3', '=AVERAGE(Data!B2:B9)' );

           $worksheet1->write( 'A4', 'Min', $heading );
           $worksheet1->write( 'B4', '=MIN(Data!B2:B9)' );

           $worksheet1->write( 'A5', 'Max', $heading );
           $worksheet1->write( 'B5', '=MAX(Data!B2:B9)' );

           $worksheet1->write( 'A6', 'Standard Deviation', $heading );
           $worksheet1->write( 'B6', '=STDEV(Data!B2:B9)' );

           $worksheet1->write( 'A7', 'Kurtosis', $heading );
           $worksheet1->write( 'B7', '=KURT(Data!B2:B9)' );

           # Write the sample data
           $worksheet2->write( 'A1', 'Sample', $heading );
           $worksheet2->write( 'A2', 1 );
           $worksheet2->write( 'A3', 2 );
           $worksheet2->write( 'A4', 3 );
           $worksheet2->write( 'A5', 4 );
           $worksheet2->write( 'A6', 5 );
           $worksheet2->write( 'A7', 6 );
           $worksheet2->write( 'A8', 7 );
           $worksheet2->write( 'A9', 8 );

           $worksheet2->write( 'B1', 'Length', $heading );
           $worksheet2->write( 'B2', 25.4,     $numformat );
           $worksheet2->write( 'B3', 25.4,     $numformat );
           $worksheet2->write( 'B4', 24.8,     $numformat );
           $worksheet2->write( 'B5', 25.0,     $numformat );
           $worksheet2->write( 'B6', 25.3,     $numformat );
           $worksheet2->write( 'B7', 24.9,     $numformat );
           $worksheet2->write( 'B8', 25.2,     $numformat );
           $worksheet2->write( 'B9', 24.8,     $numformat );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/stats_ext.pl>

   Example: stocks.pl
       Example of formatting using the Excel::Writer::XLSX module

       This example shows how to use a conditional numerical format with colours to indicate if a
       share price has gone up or down.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl -w

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example of formatting using the Excel::Writer::XLSX module
           #
           # This example shows how to use a conditional numerical format
           # with colours to indicate if a share price has gone up or down.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), March 2001, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           # Create a new workbook and add a worksheet
           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'stocks.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();

           # Set the column width for columns 1, 2, 3 and 4
           $worksheet->set_column( 0, 3, 15 );

           # Create a format for the column headings
           my $header = $workbook->add_format();
           $header->set_bold();
           $header->set_size( 12 );
           $header->set_color( 'blue' );

           # Create a format for the stock price
           my $f_price = $workbook->add_format();
           $f_price->set_align( 'left' );
           $f_price->set_num_format( '$0.00' );

           # Create a format for the stock volume
           my $f_volume = $workbook->add_format();
           $f_volume->set_align( 'left' );
           $f_volume->set_num_format( '#,##0' );

           # Create a format for the price change. This is an example of a conditional
           # format. The number is formatted as a percentage. If it is positive it is
           # formatted in green, if it is negative it is formatted in red and if it is
           # zero it is formatted as the default font colour (in this case black).
           # Note: the [Green] format produces an unappealing lime green. Try
           # [Color 10] instead for a dark green.
           #
           my $f_change = $workbook->add_format();
           $f_change->set_align( 'left' );
           $f_change->set_num_format( '[Green]0.0%;[Red]-0.0%;0.0%' );

           # Write out the data
           $worksheet->write( 0, 0, 'Company', $header );
           $worksheet->write( 0, 1, 'Price',   $header );
           $worksheet->write( 0, 2, 'Volume',  $header );
           $worksheet->write( 0, 3, 'Change',  $header );

           $worksheet->write( 1, 0, 'Damage Inc.' );
           $worksheet->write( 1, 1, 30.25, $f_price );       # $30.25
           $worksheet->write( 1, 2, 1234567, $f_volume );    # 1,234,567
           $worksheet->write( 1, 3, 0.085, $f_change );      # 8.5% in green

           $worksheet->write( 2, 0, 'Dump Corp.' );
           $worksheet->write( 2, 1, 1.56, $f_price );        # $1.56
           $worksheet->write( 2, 2, 7564, $f_volume );       # 7,564
           $worksheet->write( 2, 3, -0.015, $f_change );     # -1.5% in red

           $worksheet->write( 3, 0, 'Rev Ltd.' );
           $worksheet->write( 3, 1, 0.13, $f_price );        # $0.13
           $worksheet->write( 3, 2, 321, $f_volume );        # 321
           $worksheet->write( 3, 3, 0, $f_change );          # 0 in the font color (black)

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/stocks.pl>

   Example: tab_colors.pl
       Example of how to set Excel worksheet tab colours.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           #######################################################################
           #
           # Example of how to set Excel worksheet tab colours.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), May 2006, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'tab_colors.xlsx' );

           my $worksheet1 = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $worksheet2 = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $worksheet3 = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $worksheet4 = $workbook->add_worksheet();

           # Worksheet1 will have the default tab colour.
           $worksheet2->set_tab_color( 'red' );
           $worksheet3->set_tab_color( 'green' );
           $worksheet4->set_tab_color( '#FF6600'); # Orange

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/tab_colors.pl>

   Example: tables.pl
       Example of how to add tables to an Excel::Writer::XLSX worksheet.

       Tables in Excel are used to group rows and columns of data into a single structure that
       can be referenced in a formula or formatted collectively.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example of how to add tables to an Excel::Writer::XLSX worksheet.
           #
           # Tables in Excel are used to group rows and columns of data into a single
           # structure that can be referenced in a formula or formatted collectively.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), September 2012, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook    = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'tables.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet1  = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $worksheet2  = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $worksheet3  = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $worksheet4  = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $worksheet5  = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $worksheet6  = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $worksheet7  = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $worksheet8  = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $worksheet9  = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $worksheet10 = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $worksheet11 = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $worksheet12 = $workbook->add_worksheet();

           my $currency_format = $workbook->add_format( num_format => '$#,##0' );

           # Some sample data for the table.
           my $data = [
               [ 'Apples',  10000, 5000, 8000, 6000 ],
               [ 'Pears',   2000,  3000, 4000, 5000 ],
               [ 'Bananas', 6000,  6000, 6500, 6000 ],
               [ 'Oranges', 500,   300,  200,  700 ],

           ];

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 1.
           #
           my $caption = 'Default table with no data.';

           # Set the columns widths.
           $worksheet1->set_column( 'B:G', 12 );

           # Write the caption.
           $worksheet1->write( 'B1', $caption );

           # Add a table to the worksheet.
           $worksheet1->add_table( 'B3:F7' );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 2.
           #
           $caption = 'Default table with data.';

           # Set the columns widths.
           $worksheet2->set_column( 'B:G', 12 );

           # Write the caption.
           $worksheet2->write( 'B1', $caption );

           # Add a table to the worksheet.
           $worksheet2->add_table( 'B3:F7', { data => $data } );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 3.
           #
           $caption = 'Table without default autofilter.';

           # Set the columns widths.
           $worksheet3->set_column( 'B:G', 12 );

           # Write the caption.
           $worksheet3->write( 'B1', $caption );

           # Add a table to the worksheet.
           $worksheet3->add_table( 'B3:F7', { autofilter => 0 } );

           # Table data can also be written separately, as an array or individual cells.
           $worksheet3->write_col( 'B4', $data );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 4.
           #
           $caption = 'Table without default header row.';

           # Set the columns widths.
           $worksheet4->set_column( 'B:G', 12 );

           # Write the caption.
           $worksheet4->write( 'B1', $caption );

           # Add a table to the worksheet.
           $worksheet4->add_table( 'B4:F7', { header_row => 0 } );

           # Table data can also be written separately, as an array or individual cells.
           $worksheet4->write_col( 'B4', $data );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 5.
           #
           $caption = 'Default table with "First Column" and "Last Column" options.';

           # Set the columns widths.
           $worksheet5->set_column( 'B:G', 12 );

           # Write the caption.
           $worksheet5->write( 'B1', $caption );

           # Add a table to the worksheet.
           $worksheet5->add_table( 'B3:F7', { first_column => 1, last_column => 1 } );

           # Table data can also be written separately, as an array or individual cells.
           $worksheet5->write_col( 'B4', $data );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 6.
           #
           $caption = 'Table with banded columns but without default banded rows.';

           # Set the columns widths.
           $worksheet6->set_column( 'B:G', 12 );

           # Write the caption.
           $worksheet6->write( 'B1', $caption );

           # Add a table to the worksheet.
           $worksheet6->add_table( 'B3:F7', { banded_rows => 0, banded_columns => 1 } );

           # Table data can also be written separately, as an array or individual cells.
           $worksheet6->write_col( 'B4', $data );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 7.
           #
           $caption = 'Table with user defined column headers';

           # Set the columns widths.
           $worksheet7->set_column( 'B:G', 12 );

           # Write the caption.
           $worksheet7->write( 'B1', $caption );

           # Add a table to the worksheet.
           $worksheet7->add_table(
               'B3:F7',
               {
                   data    => $data,
                   columns => [
                       { header => 'Product' },
                       { header => 'Quarter 1' },
                       { header => 'Quarter 2' },
                       { header => 'Quarter 3' },
                       { header => 'Quarter 4' },
                   ]
               }
           );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 8.
           #
           $caption = 'Table with user defined column headers';

           # Set the columns widths.
           $worksheet8->set_column( 'B:G', 12 );

           # Write the caption.
           $worksheet8->write( 'B1', $caption );

           # Add a table to the worksheet.
           $worksheet8->add_table(
               'B3:G7',
               {
                   data    => $data,
                   columns => [
                       { header => 'Product' },
                       { header => 'Quarter 1' },
                       { header => 'Quarter 2' },
                       { header => 'Quarter 3' },
                       { header => 'Quarter 4' },
                       {
                           header  => 'Year',
                           formula => '=SUM(Table8[@[Quarter 1]:[Quarter 4]])'
                       },
                   ]
               }
           );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 9.
           #
           $caption = 'Table with totals row (but no caption or totals).';

           # Set the columns widths.
           $worksheet9->set_column( 'B:G', 12 );

           # Write the caption.
           $worksheet9->write( 'B1', $caption );

           # Add a table to the worksheet.
           $worksheet9->add_table(
               'B3:G8',
               {
                   data      => $data,
                   total_row => 1,
                   columns   => [
                       { header => 'Product' },
                       { header => 'Quarter 1' },
                       { header => 'Quarter 2' },
                       { header => 'Quarter 3' },
                       { header => 'Quarter 4' },
                       {
                           header  => 'Year',
                           formula => '=SUM(Table9[@[Quarter 1]:[Quarter 4]])'
                       },
                   ]
               }
           );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 10.
           #
           $caption = 'Table with totals row with user captions and functions.';

           # Set the columns widths.
           $worksheet10->set_column( 'B:G', 12 );

           # Write the caption.
           $worksheet10->write( 'B1', $caption );

           # Add a table to the worksheet.
           $worksheet10->add_table(
               'B3:G8',
               {
                   data      => $data,
                   total_row => 1,
                   columns   => [
                       { header => 'Product',   total_string   => 'Totals' },
                       { header => 'Quarter 1', total_function => 'sum' },
                       { header => 'Quarter 2', total_function => 'sum' },
                       { header => 'Quarter 3', total_function => 'sum' },
                       { header => 'Quarter 4', total_function => 'sum' },
                       {
                           header         => 'Year',
                           formula        => '=SUM(Table10[@[Quarter 1]:[Quarter 4]])',
                           total_function => 'sum'
                       },
                   ]
               }
           );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 11.
           #
           $caption = 'Table with alternative Excel style.';

           # Set the columns widths.
           $worksheet11->set_column( 'B:G', 12 );

           # Write the caption.
           $worksheet11->write( 'B1', $caption );

           # Add a table to the worksheet.
           $worksheet11->add_table(
               'B3:G8',
               {
                   data      => $data,
                   style     => 'Table Style Light 11',
                   total_row => 1,
                   columns   => [
                       { header => 'Product',   total_string   => 'Totals' },
                       { header => 'Quarter 1', total_function => 'sum' },
                       { header => 'Quarter 2', total_function => 'sum' },
                       { header => 'Quarter 3', total_function => 'sum' },
                       { header => 'Quarter 4', total_function => 'sum' },
                       {
                           header         => 'Year',
                           formula        => '=SUM(Table11[@[Quarter 1]:[Quarter 4]])',
                           total_function => 'sum'
                       },
                   ]
               }
           );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example 12.
           #
           $caption = 'Table with column formats.';

           # Set the columns widths.
           $worksheet12->set_column( 'B:G', 12 );

           # Write the caption.
           $worksheet12->write( 'B1', $caption );

           # Add a table to the worksheet.
           $worksheet12->add_table(
               'B3:G8',
               {
                   data      => $data,
                   total_row => 1,
                   columns   => [
                       { header => 'Product', total_string => 'Totals' },
                       {
                           header         => 'Quarter 1',
                           total_function => 'sum',
                           format         => $currency_format,
                       },
                       {
                           header         => 'Quarter 2',
                           total_function => 'sum',
                           format         => $currency_format,
                       },
                       {
                           header         => 'Quarter 3',
                           total_function => 'sum',
                           format         => $currency_format,
                       },
                       {
                           header         => 'Quarter 4',
                           total_function => 'sum',
                           format         => $currency_format,
                       },
                       {
                           header         => 'Year',
                           formula        => '=SUM(Table12[@[Quarter 1]:[Quarter 4]])',
                           total_function => 'sum',
                           format         => $currency_format,
                       },
                   ]
               }
           );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/tables.pl>

   Example: write_handler1.pl
       Example of how to add a user defined data handler to the Excel::Writer::XLSX write()
       method.

       The following example shows how to add a handler for a 7 digit ID number.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl -w

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example of how to add a user defined data handler to the
           # Excel::Writer::XLSX write() method.
           #
           # The following example shows how to add a handler for a 7 digit ID number.
           #
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), September 2004, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'write_handler1.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Add a handler for 7 digit id numbers. This is useful when you want a string
           # such as 0000001 written as a string instead of a number and thus preserve
           # the leading zeroes.
           #
           # Note: you can get the same effect using the keep_leading_zeros() method but
           # this serves as a simple example.
           #
           $worksheet->add_write_handler( qr[^\d{7}$], \&write_my_id );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # The following function processes the data when a match is found.
           #
           sub write_my_id {

               my $worksheet = shift;

               return $worksheet->write_string( @_ );
           }

           # This format maintains the cell as text even if it is edited.
           my $id_format = $workbook->add_format( num_format => '@' );

           # Write some numbers in the user defined format
           $worksheet->write( 'A1', '0000000', $id_format );
           $worksheet->write( 'A2', '0000001', $id_format );
           $worksheet->write( 'A3', '0004000', $id_format );
           $worksheet->write( 'A4', '1234567', $id_format );

           # Write some numbers that don't match the defined format
           $worksheet->write( 'A6', '000000', $id_format );
           $worksheet->write( 'A7', '000001', $id_format );
           $worksheet->write( 'A8', '004000', $id_format );
           $worksheet->write( 'A9', '123456', $id_format );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/write_handler1.pl>

   Example: write_handler2.pl
       Example of how to add a user defined data handler to the Excel::Writer::XLSX write()
       method.

       The following example shows how to add a handler for a 7 digit ID number.  It adds an
       additional constraint to the write_handler1.pl in that it only filters data that isn't in
       the third column.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl -w

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example of how to add a user defined data handler to the
           # Excel::Writer::XLSX write() method.
           #
           # The following example shows how to add a handler for a 7 digit ID number.
           # It adds an additional constraint to the write_handler1.pl in that it only
           # filters data that isn't in the third column.
           #
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), September 2004, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'write_handler2.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Add a handler for 7 digit id numbers. This is useful when you want a string
           # such as 0000001 written as a string instead of a number and thus preserve
           # the leading zeroes.
           #
           # Note: you can get the same effect using the keep_leading_zeros() method but
           # this serves as a simple example.
           #
           $worksheet->add_write_handler( qr[^\d{7}$], \&write_my_id );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # The following function processes the data when a match is found. The handler
           # is set up so that it only filters data if it is in the third column.
           #
           sub write_my_id {

               my $worksheet = shift;
               my $col       = $_[1];

               # col is zero based
               if ( $col != 2 ) {
                   return $worksheet->write_string( @_ );
               }
               else {

                   # Reject the match and return control to write()
                   return undef;
               }

           }

           # This format maintains the cell as text even if it is edited.
           my $id_format = $workbook->add_format( num_format => '@' );

           # Write some numbers in the user defined format
           $worksheet->write( 'A1', '0000000', $id_format );
           $worksheet->write( 'B1', '0000001', $id_format );
           $worksheet->write( 'C1', '0000002', $id_format );
           $worksheet->write( 'D1', '0000003', $id_format );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/write_handler2.pl>

   Example: write_handler3.pl
       Example of how to add a user defined data handler to the Excel::Writer::XLSX write()
       method.

       The following example shows how to add a handler for dates in a specific format.

       See write_handler4.pl for a more rigorous example with error handling.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl -w

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example of how to add a user defined data handler to the
           # Excel::Writer::XLSX write() method.
           #
           # The following example shows how to add a handler for dates in a specific
           # format.
           #
           # See write_handler4.pl for a more rigorous example with error handling.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), September 2004, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook    = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'write_handler3.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet   = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $date_format = $workbook->add_format( num_format => 'dd/mm/yy' );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Add a handler to match dates in the following format: d/m/yyyy
           #
           # The day and month can be single or double digits.
           #
           $worksheet->add_write_handler( qr[^\d{1,2}/\d{1,2}/\d{4}$], \&write_my_date );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # The following function processes the data when a match is found.
           # See write_handler4.pl for a more rigorous example with error handling.
           #
           sub write_my_date {

               my $worksheet = shift;
               my @args      = @_;

               my $token = $args[2];
               $token =~ qr[^(\d{1,2})/(\d{1,2})/(\d{4})$];

               # Change to the date format required by write_date_time().
               my $date = sprintf "%4d-%02d-%02dT", $3, $2, $1;

               $args[2] = $date;

               return $worksheet->write_date_time( @args );
           }

           # Write some dates in the user defined format
           $worksheet->write( 'A1', '22/12/2004', $date_format );
           $worksheet->write( 'A2', '1/1/1995',   $date_format );
           $worksheet->write( 'A3', '01/01/1995', $date_format );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/write_handler3.pl>

   Example: write_handler4.pl
       Example of how to add a user defined data handler to the Excel::Writer::XLSX write()
       method.

       The following example shows how to add a handler for dates in a specific format.

       This is a more rigorous version of write_handler3.pl.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl -w

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Example of how to add a user defined data handler to the
           # Excel::Writer::XLSX write() method.
           #
           # The following example shows how to add a handler for dates in a specific
           # format.
           #
           # This is a more rigorous version of write_handler3.pl.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), September 2004, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook    = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'write_handler4.xlsx' );
           my $worksheet   = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           my $date_format = $workbook->add_format( num_format => 'dd/mm/yy' );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # Add a handler to match dates in the following formats: d/m/yy, d/m/yyyy
           #
           # The day and month can be single or double digits and the year can be  2 or 4
           # digits.
           #
           $worksheet->add_write_handler( qr[^\d{1,2}/\d{1,2}/\d{2,4}$], \&write_my_date );

           ###############################################################################
           #
           # The following function processes the data when a match is found.
           #
           sub write_my_date {

               my $worksheet = shift;
               my @args      = @_;

               my $token = $args[2];

               if ( $token =~ qr[^(\d{1,2})/(\d{1,2})/(\d{2,4})$] ) {

                   my $day  = $1;
                   my $mon  = $2;
                   my $year = $3;

                   # Use a window for 2 digit dates. This will keep some ragged Perl
                   # programmer employed in thirty years time. :-)
                   if ( length $year == 2 ) {
                       if ( $year < 50 ) {
                           $year += 2000;
                       }
                       else {
                           $year += 1900;
                       }
                   }

                   my $date = sprintf "%4d-%02d-%02dT", $year, $mon, $day;

                   # Convert the ISO ISO8601 style string to an Excel date
                   $date = $worksheet->convert_date_time( $date );

                   if ( defined $date ) {

                       # Date was valid
                       $args[2] = $date;
                       return $worksheet->write_number( @args );
                   }
                   else {

                       # Not a valid date therefore write as a string
                       return $worksheet->write_string( @args );
                   }
               }
               else {

                   # Shouldn't happen if the same match is used in the re and sub.
                   return undef;
               }
           }

           # Write some dates in the user defined format
           $worksheet->write( 'A1', '22/12/2004', $date_format );
           $worksheet->write( 'A2', '22/12/04',   $date_format );
           $worksheet->write( 'A3', '2/12/04',    $date_format );
           $worksheet->write( 'A4', '2/5/04',     $date_format );
           $worksheet->write( 'A5', '2/5/95',     $date_format );
           $worksheet->write( 'A6', '2/5/1995',   $date_format );

           # Some erroneous dates
           $worksheet->write( 'A8', '2/5/1895',  $date_format ); # Date out of Excel range
           $worksheet->write( 'A9', '29/2/2003', $date_format ); # Invalid leap day
           $worksheet->write( 'A10', '50/50/50', $date_format ); # Matches but isn't a date

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/write_handler4.pl>

   Example: write_to_scalar.pl
       An example of writing an Excel::Writer::XLSX file to a perl scalar.

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           ##############################################################################
           #
           # An example of writing an Excel::Writer::XLSX file to a perl scalar.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), September 2004, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           # Use a scalar as a filehandle.
           open my $fh, '>', \my $str or die "Failed to open filehandle: $!";

           # Spreadsheet::WriteExce accepts filehandle as well as file names.
           my $workbook  = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( $fh );
           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();

           $worksheet->write( 0, 0, 'Hi Excel!' );

           $workbook->close();

           # The Excel file in now in $str. Remember to binmode() the output
           # filehandle before printing it.
           open my $out_fh, '>', 'write_to_scalar.xlsx'
             or die "Failed to open out filehandle: $!";

           binmode $out_fh;
           print   $out_fh $str;
           close   $out_fh;

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/write_to_scalar.pl>

   Example: unicode_2022_jp.pl
       A simple example of converting some Unicode text to an Excel file using
       Excel::Writer::XLSX.

       This example generates some Japanese from a file with ISO-2022-JP encoded text.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           ##############################################################################
           #
           # A simple example of converting some Unicode text to an Excel file using
           # Excel::Writer::XLSX.
           #
           # This example generates some Japanese from a file with ISO-2022-JP
           # encoded text.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), September 2004, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'unicode_2022_jp.xlsx' );

           die "Couldn't create new Excel file: $!.\n" unless defined $workbook;

           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           $worksheet->set_column( 'A:A', 50 );

           my $file = 'unicode_2022_jp.txt';

           open FH, '<:encoding(iso-2022-jp)', $file or die "Couldn't open $file: $!\n";

           my $row = 0;

           while ( <FH> ) {
               next if /^#/;    # Ignore the comments in the sample file.
               chomp;
               $worksheet->write( $row++, 0, $_ );
           }

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/unicode_2022_jp.pl>

   Example: unicode_8859_11.pl
       A simple example of converting some Unicode text to an Excel file using
       Excel::Writer::XLSX.

       This example generates some Thai from a file with ISO-8859-11 encoded text.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           ##############################################################################
           #
           # A simple example of converting some Unicode text to an Excel file using
           # Excel::Writer::XLSX.
           #
           # This example generates some Thai from a file with ISO-8859-11 encoded text.
           #
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), September 2004, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'unicode_8859_11.xlsx' );

           die "Couldn't create new Excel file: $!.\n" unless defined $workbook;

           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           $worksheet->set_column( 'A:A', 50 );

           my $file = 'unicode_8859_11.txt';

           open FH, '<:encoding(iso-8859-11)', $file or die "Couldn't open $file: $!\n";

           my $row = 0;

           while ( <FH> ) {
               next if /^#/;    # Ignore the comments in the sample file.
               chomp;
               $worksheet->write( $row++, 0, $_ );
           }

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/unicode_8859_11.pl>

   Example: unicode_8859_7.pl
       A simple example of converting some Unicode text to an Excel file using
       Excel::Writer::XLSX.

       This example generates some Greek from a file with ISO-8859-7 encoded text.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           ##############################################################################
           #
           # A simple example of converting some Unicode text to an Excel file using
           # Excel::Writer::XLSX.
           #
           # This example generates some Greek from a file with ISO-8859-7 encoded text.
           #
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), September 2004, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'unicode_8859_7.xlsx' );

           die "Couldn't create new Excel file: $!.\n" unless defined $workbook;

           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           $worksheet->set_column( 'A:A', 50 );

           my $file = 'unicode_8859_7.txt';

           open FH, '<:encoding(iso-8859-7)', $file or die "Couldn't open $file: $!\n";

           my $row = 0;

           while ( <FH> ) {
               next if /^#/;    # Ignore the comments in the sample file.
               chomp;
               $worksheet->write( $row++, 0, $_ );
           }

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/unicode_8859_7.pl>

   Example: unicode_big5.pl
       A simple example of converting some Unicode text to an Excel file using
       Excel::Writer::XLSX.

       This example generates some Chinese from a file with BIG5 encoded text.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           ##############################################################################
           #
           # A simple example of converting some Unicode text to an Excel file using
           # Excel::Writer::XLSX.
           #
           # This example generates some Chinese from a file with BIG5 encoded text.
           #
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), September 2004, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'unicode_big5.xlsx' );

           die "Couldn't create new Excel file: $!.\n" unless defined $workbook;

           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           $worksheet->set_column( 'A:A', 80 );

           my $file = 'unicode_big5.txt';

           open FH, '<:encoding(big5)', $file or die "Couldn't open $file: $!\n";

           my $row = 0;

           while ( <FH> ) {
               next if /^#/;    # Ignore the comments in the sample file.
               chomp;
               $worksheet->write( $row++, 0, $_ );
           }

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/unicode_big5.pl>

   Example: unicode_cp1251.pl
       A simple example of converting some Unicode text to an Excel file using
       Excel::Writer::XLSX.

       This example generates some Russian from a file with CP1251 encoded text.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           ##############################################################################
           #
           # A simple example of converting some Unicode text to an Excel file using
           # Excel::Writer::XLSX.
           #
           # This example generates some Russian from a file with CP1251 encoded text.
           #
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), September 2004, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'unicode_cp1251.xlsx' );

           die "Couldn't create new Excel file: $!.\n" unless defined $workbook;

           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           $worksheet->set_column( 'A:A', 50 );

           my $file = 'unicode_cp1251.txt';

           open FH, '<:encoding(cp1251)', $file or die "Couldn't open $file: $!\n";

           my $row = 0;

           while ( <FH> ) {
               next if /^#/;    # Ignore the comments in the sample file.
               chomp;
               $worksheet->write( $row++, 0, $_ );
           }

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/unicode_cp1251.pl>

   Example: unicode_cp1256.pl
       A simple example of converting some Unicode text to an Excel file using
       Excel::Writer::XLSX.

       This example generates some Arabic text from a CP-1256 encoded file.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           ##############################################################################
           #
           # A simple example of converting some Unicode text to an Excel file using
           # Excel::Writer::XLSX.
           #
           # This example generates some Arabic text from a CP-1256 encoded file.
           #
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), September 2004, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'unicode_cp1256.xlsx' );

           die "Couldn't create new Excel file: $!.\n" unless defined $workbook;

           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           $worksheet->set_column( 'A:A', 50 );

           my $file = 'unicode_cp1256.txt';

           open FH, '<:encoding(cp1256)', $file or die "Couldn't open $file: $!\n";

           my $row = 0;

           while ( <FH> ) {
               next if /^#/;    # Ignore the comments in the sample file.
               chomp;
               $worksheet->write( $row++, 0, $_ );
           }

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/unicode_cp1256.pl>

   Example: unicode_cyrillic.pl
       A simple example of writing some Russian cyrillic text using Excel::Writer::XLSX.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           ##############################################################################
           #
           # A simple example of writing some Russian cyrillic text using
           # Excel::Writer::XLSX.
           #
           #
           #
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), March 2005, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           # In this example we generate utf8 strings from character data but in a
           # real application we would expect them to come from an external source.
           #

           # Create a Russian worksheet name in utf8.
           my $sheet = pack "U*", 0x0421, 0x0442, 0x0440, 0x0430, 0x043D, 0x0438,
             0x0446, 0x0430;

           # Create a Russian string.
           my $str = pack "U*", 0x0417, 0x0434, 0x0440, 0x0430, 0x0432, 0x0441,
             0x0442, 0x0432, 0x0443, 0x0439, 0x0020, 0x041C,
             0x0438, 0x0440, 0x0021;

           my $workbook = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'unicode_cyrillic.xlsx' );

           die "Couldn't create new Excel file: $!.\n" unless defined $workbook;

           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet( $sheet . '1' );

           $worksheet->set_column( 'A:A', 18 );
           $worksheet->write( 'A1', $str );

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/unicode_cyrillic.pl>

   Example: unicode_koi8r.pl
       A simple example of converting some Unicode text to an Excel file using
       Excel::Writer::XLSX.

       This example generates some Russian from a file with KOI8-R encoded text.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           ##############################################################################
           #
           # A simple example of converting some Unicode text to an Excel file using
           # Excel::Writer::XLSX.
           #
           # This example generates some Russian from a file with KOI8-R encoded text.
           #
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), September 2004, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'unicode_koi8r.xlsx' );

           die "Couldn't create new Excel file: $!.\n" unless defined $workbook;

           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           $worksheet->set_column( 'A:A', 50 );

           my $file = 'unicode_koi8r.txt';

           open FH, '<:encoding(koi8-r)', $file or die "Couldn't open $file: $!\n";

           my $row = 0;

           while ( <FH> ) {
               next if /^#/;    # Ignore the comments in the sample file.
               chomp;
               $worksheet->write( $row++, 0, $_ );
           }

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/unicode_koi8r.pl>

   Example: unicode_polish_utf8.pl
       A simple example of converting some Unicode text to an Excel file using
       Excel::Writer::XLSX.

       This example generates some Polish from a file with UTF8 encoded text.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           ##############################################################################
           #
           # A simple example of converting some Unicode text to an Excel file using
           # Excel::Writer::XLSX.
           #
           # This example generates some Polish from a file with UTF8 encoded text.
           #
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), September 2004, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'unicode_polish_utf8.xlsx' );

           die "Couldn't create new Excel file: $!.\n" unless defined $workbook;

           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           $worksheet->set_column( 'A:A', 50 );

           my $file = 'unicode_polish_utf8.txt';

           open FH, '<:encoding(utf8)', $file or die "Couldn't open $file: $!\n";

           my $row = 0;

           while ( <FH> ) {
               next if /^#/;    # Ignore the comments in the sample file.
               chomp;
               $worksheet->write( $row++, 0, $_ );
           }

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/unicode_polish_utf8.pl>

   Example: unicode_shift_jis.pl
       A simple example of converting some Unicode text to an Excel file using
       Excel::Writer::XLSX.

       This example generates some Japenese text from a file with Shift-JIS encoded text.

       Source code for this example:

           #!/usr/bin/perl

           ##############################################################################
           #
           # A simple example of converting some Unicode text to an Excel file using
           # Excel::Writer::XLSX.
           #
           # This example generates some Japenese text from a file with Shift-JIS
           # encoded text.
           #
           # reverse ('(c)'), September 2004, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
           #

           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Excel::Writer::XLSX;

           my $workbook = Excel::Writer::XLSX->new( 'unicode_shift_jis.xlsx' );

           die "Couldn't create new Excel file: $!.\n" unless defined $workbook;

           my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();
           $worksheet->set_column( 'A:A', 50 );

           my $file = 'unicode_shift_jis.txt';

           open FH, '<:encoding(shiftjis)', $file or die "Couldn't open $file: $!\n";

           my $row = 0;

           while ( <FH> ) {
               next if /^#/;    # Ignore the comments in the sample file.
               chomp;
               $worksheet->write( $row++, 0, $_ );
           }

           $workbook->close();

           __END__

       Download this example:
       <http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/JMCNAMARA/Excel-Writer-XLSX-0.99/examples/unicode_shift_jis.pl>

AUTHOR

       John McNamara jmcnamara@cpan.org

       Contributed examples contain the original author's name.

COPYRIGHT

       Copyright MM-MMXVI, John McNamara.

       All Rights Reserved. This module is free software. It may be used, redistributed and/or
       modified under the same terms as Perl itself.