Provided by: libtest-compile-perl_2.2.2-1_all bug

NAME

       Test::Compile - Check whether Perl files compile correctly.

SYNOPSIS

           use Test::Compile;

           # The OO way (recommended)
           my $test = Test::Compile->new();
           $test->all_files_ok();
           $test->done_testing();

           # The procedural way (deprecated)
           use Test::Compile qw( all_pm_files_ok );
           all_pm_files_ok();

DESCRIPTION

       "Test::Compile" lets you check the whether your perl modules and scripts compile properly,
       and report its results in standard "Test::Simple" fashion.

       The basic usage - as shown above, will locate your perl files and test that they all
       compile.

       Module authors can (and probably should) include the following in a t/00-compile.t file
       and have "Test::Compile" automatically find and check all Perl files in a module
       distribution:

           #!perl
           use strict;
           use warnings;
           use Test::Compile;
           my $test = Test::Compile->new();
           $test->all_files_ok();
           $test->done_testing();

METHODS

       "new()"
           A basic constructor, nothing special except that it returns a Test::Compile::Internal
           object.

       "all_files_ok(@dirs)"
           Checks all the perl files it can find for compilation errors.

           If @dirs is defined then it is taken as an array of directories to be searched for
           perl files, otherwise it searches some default locations - see "all_pm_files(@dirs)"
           and "all_pl_files(@dirs)".

       "all_pm_files(@dirs)"
           Returns a list of all the perl module files - that is any files ending in .pm in @dirs
           and in directories below. If @dirs is undefined, it searches blib if blib exists, or
           else lib.

           Skips any files in "CVS", ".svn", or ".git" directories.

           The order of the files returned is machine-dependent. If you want them sorted, you'll
           have to sort them yourself.

       "all_pl_files(@dirs)"
           Returns a list of all the perl script files - that is, any files in @dirs that either
           have a .pl extension, or have no extension and have a perl shebang line.

           If @dirs is undefined, it searches script if script exists, or else bin if bin exists.

           Skips any files in "CVS", ".svn", or ".git" directories.

           The order of the files returned is machine-dependent. If you want them sorted, you'll
           have to sort them yourself.

   Test Methods
       "Test::Compile::Internal" encapsulates a "Test::Builder" object, and provides access to
       some of its methods.

       "done_testing()"
           Declares that you are done testing, no more tests will be run after this point.

       "diag(@msgs)"
           Prints out the given @msgs. Like print, arguments are simply appended together.

           Output will be indented and marked with a # so as not to interfere with test output. A
           newline will be put on the end if there isn't one already.

           We encourage using this rather than calling print directly.

       "skip($reason)"
           Skips the current test, reporting the $reason.

FUNCTIONS

       The use of the following functions is deprecated and strongly discouraged.

       They are automatically exported to your namespace,  which is no longer considered best
       practise.  At some stage in the future, this will stop and you'll have to import them
       explicitly.

       Even then, you really should use the object oriented methods as they provide a more
       consistent interface.  For example: "all_pm_files_ok()" calls the "plan()" function - so
       you can't call multiple test functions in the same test file.

       You should definately use the object oriented interface described in the "SYNOPSIS" and in
       Test::Compile::Internal instead of calling these functions.

       "all_pm_files_ok(@files)"
           Checks all the perl module files it can find for compilation errors.

           It uses "all_pm_files(@files)" to find the perl module files.

           It also calls the "plan()" function for you (one test for each module), so you can't
           have already called "plan()". Unfortunately, this also means you can't use this
           function with "all_pl_files_ok()".  If this is a problem you should really be using
           the object oriented interface.

           Returns true if all Perl module files are ok, or false if any fail.

       "all_pl_files_ok(@files)"
           Checks all the perl script files it can find for compilation errors.

           It uses "all_pl_files(@files)" to find the perl script files.

           It also calls the "plan()" function for you (one test for each script), so you can't
           have already called "plan". Unfortunately, this also means you can't use this function
           with "all_pm_files_ok()".  If this is a problem you should really be using the object
           oriented interface.

           Returns true if all Perl script files are ok, or false if any fail.

           Module authors can include the following in a t/00_compile_scripts.t file and have
           "Test::Compile" automatically find and check all Perl script files in a module
           distribution:

               #!perl -w
               use strict;
               use warnings;
               use Test::More;
               eval "use Test::Compile";
               plan skip_all => "Test::Compile required for testing compilation"
                 if $@;
               my $test = Test::Compile->new();
               $test->all_pl_files_ok();
               $test->done_testing();

       "pm_file_ok($filename, $testname)"
           "pm_file_ok()" will okay the test if $filename compiles as a perl module.

           The optional second argument $testname is the name of the test. If it is omitted,
           "pm_file_ok()" chooses a default test name "Compile test for $filename".

       "pl_file_ok($filename, $testname)"
           "pl_file_ok()" will okay the test if $filename compiles as a perl script. You need to
           give the path to the script relative to this distribution's base directory. So if you
           put your scripts in a 'top-level' directory called script the argument would be
           "script/filename".

           The optional second argument $testname is the name of the test. If it is omitted,
           "pl_file_ok()" chooses a default test name "Compile test for $filename".

       "all_pm_files(@dirs)"
           Returns a list of all the perl module files - that is, files ending in .pm - in @dirs
           and in directories below. If no directories are passed, it defaults to blib if blib
           exists, or else lib if not. Skips any files in "CVS", ".svn", or ".git" directories.

           The order of the files returned is machine-dependent. If you want them sorted, you'll
           have to sort them yourself.

       "all_pl_files(@dirs)"
           Returns a list of all the perl script files - that is, any files in @dirs that either
           have a .pl extension, or have no extension and have a perl shebang line.

           If @dirs is undefined, it searches script if script exists, or else bin if bin exists.

           Skips any files in "CVS" or ".svn" directories.

           The order of the files returned is machine-dependent. If you want them sorted, you'll
           have to sort them yourself.

       "all_files_ok(@dirs)"
           Checks all the perl files it can find for compilation errors.

           If @dirs is defined then it is taken as an array of directories to be searched for
           perl files, otherwise it searches some default locations - see "all_pm_files(@dirs)"
           and "all_pl_files(@dirs)".

AUTHORS

       Sagar R. Shah "<srshah@cpan.org>", Marcel Gruenauer, "<marcel@cpan.org>", Evan Giles,
       "<egiles@cpan.org>"

COPYRIGHT AND LICENSE

       Copyright 2007-2019 by the authors.

       This library is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the same
       terms as Perl itself.

SEE ALSO

       Test::Compile::Internal provides the object oriented interface to (and the inner workings
       for) the Test::Compile functionality.

       Test::Strict provides functions to ensure your perl files compile, with added bonus that
       it will check you have used strict in all your files.  Test::LoadAllModules just handles
       modules, not script files, but has more fine-grained control.