Provided by: libtime-moment-perl_0.44-1build1_amd64 bug

NAME

       Time::Moment - Represents a date and time of day with an offset from UTC

SYNOPSIS

           $tm = Time::Moment->new(
               year       => 2012,
               month      => 12,
               day        => 24,
               hour       => 15,
               minute     => 30,
               second     => 45,
               nanosecond => 123456789,
               offset     => 0,
           );
           $tm = Time::Moment->now;
           $tm = Time::Moment->now_utc;
           $tm = Time::Moment->from_epoch($seconds);
           $tm = Time::Moment->from_object($object);
           $tm = Time::Moment->from_string($string);
           $tm = Time::Moment->from_rd($rd);
           $tm = Time::Moment->from_jd($jd);
           $tm = Time::Moment->from_mjd($mjd);

           $year         = $tm->year;                      # [1, 9999]
           $quarter      = $tm->quarter;                   # [1, 4]
           $month        = $tm->month;                     # [1, 12]
           $week         = $tm->week;                      # [1, 53]

           $day          = $tm->day_of_year;               # [1, 366]
           $day          = $tm->day_of_quarter;            # [1, 92]
           $day          = $tm->day_of_month;              # [1, 31]
           $day          = $tm->day_of_week;               # [1=Monday, 7=Sunday]

           $hour         = $tm->hour;                      # [0, 23]
           $minute       = $tm->minute;                    # [0, 59]
           $minute       = $tm->minute_of_day;             # [0, 1439]
           $second       = $tm->second;                    # [0, 59]
           $second       = $tm->second_of_day;             # [0, 86_399]
           $millisecond  = $tm->millisecond;               # [0, 999]
           $millisecond  = $tm->millisecond_of_day;        # [0, 86_399_999]
           $microsecond  = $tm->microsecond;               # [0, 999_999]
           $microsecond  = $tm->microsecond_of_day;        # [0, 86_399_999_999]
           $nanosecond   = $tm->nanosecond;                # [0, 999_999_999]
           $nanosecond   = $tm->nanosecond_of_day;         # [0, 86_399_999_999_999]

           $epoch        = $tm->epoch;
           $offset       = $tm->offset;                    # [-1080, 1080] (±18:00)

           $jd           = $tm->jd;                        # Julian Date
           $mjd          = $tm->mjd;                       # Modified Julian Date
           $rd           = $tm->rd;                        # Rata Die

           $tm2          = $tm1->with($adjuster);
           $tm2          = $tm1->with_year($year);
           $tm2          = $tm1->with_quarter($quarter);
           $tm2          = $tm1->with_month($month);
           $tm2          = $tm1->with_week($week);
           $tm2          = $tm1->with_day_of_year($day);
           $tm2          = $tm1->with_day_of_quarter($day);
           $tm2          = $tm1->with_day_of_month($day);
           $tm2          = $tm1->with_day_of_week($day);
           $tm2          = $tm1->with_hour($hour);
           $tm2          = $tm1->with_minute($minute);
           $tm2          = $tm1->with_minute_of_day($minute);
           $tm2          = $tm1->with_second($second);
           $tm2          = $tm1->with_second_of_day($second);
           $tm2          = $tm1->with_millisecond($millisecond);
           $tm2          = $tm1->with_millisecond_of_day($millisecond);
           $tm2          = $tm1->with_microsecond($microsecond);
           $tm2          = $tm1->with_microsecond_of_day($microsecond);
           $tm2          = $tm1->with_nanosecond($nanosecond);
           $tm2          = $tm1->with_nanosecond_of_day($nanosecond);

           $tm2          = $tm1->with_offset_same_instant($offset);
           $tm2          = $tm1->with_offset_same_local($offset);

           $tm2          = $tm1->with_precision($precision);

           $tm2          = $tm1->plus_years($years);
           $tm2          = $tm1->plus_months($months);
           $tm2          = $tm1->plus_weeks($weeks);
           $tm2          = $tm1->plus_days($days);
           $tm2          = $tm1->plus_hours($hours);
           $tm2          = $tm1->plus_minutes($minutes);
           $tm2          = $tm1->plus_seconds($seconds);
           $tm2          = $tm1->plus_milliseconds($milliseconds);
           $tm2          = $tm1->plus_microseconds($microseconds);
           $tm2          = $tm1->plus_nanoseconds($nanoseconds);

           $tm2          = $tm1->minus_years($years);
           $tm2          = $tm1->minus_months($months);
           $tm2          = $tm1->minus_weeks($weeks);
           $tm2          = $tm1->minus_days($days);
           $tm2          = $tm1->minus_hours($hours);
           $tm2          = $tm1->minus_minutes($minutes);
           $tm2          = $tm1->minus_seconds($seconds);
           $tm2          = $tm1->minus_milliseconds($milliseconds);
           $tm2          = $tm1->minus_microseconds($microseconds);
           $tm2          = $tm1->minus_nanoseconds($nanoseconds);

           $years        = $tm1->delta_years($tm2);
           $months       = $tm1->delta_months($tm2);
           $weeks        = $tm1->delta_weeks($tm2);
           $days         = $tm1->delta_days($tm2);
           $hours        = $tm1->delta_hours($tm2);
           $minutes      = $tm1->delta_minutes($tm2);
           $seconds      = $tm1->delta_seconds($tm2);
           $milliseconds = $tm1->delta_milliseconds($tm2);
           $microseconds = $tm1->delta_microseconds($tm2);
           $nanoseconds  = $tm1->delta_nanoseconds($tm2);

           $tm2          = $tm1->at_utc;

           $tm2          = $tm1->at_midnight;              # T00:00:00.0
           $tm2          = $tm1->at_noon;                  # T12:00:00.0

           $tm2          = $tm1->at_last_day_of_year;
           $tm2          = $tm1->at_last_day_of_quarter;
           $tm2          = $tm1->at_last_day_of_month;

           $boolean      = $tm1->is_before($tm2);
           $boolean      = $tm1->is_after($tm2);
           $boolean      = $tm1->is_equal($tm2);

           $integer      = $tm1->compare($tm2);

           $boolean      = $tm->is_leap_year;

           $string       = $tm->to_string;
           $string       = $tm->strftime($format);

           $integer      = $tm->length_of_year;            # [365, 366]
           $integer      = $tm->length_of_quarter;         # [90, 92]
           $integer      = $tm->length_of_month;           # [28, 31]
           $integer      = $tm->length_of_week_year;       # [52, 53]

           @values       = $tm->utc_rd_values;
           $seconds      = $tm->utc_rd_as_seconds;
           @values       = $tm->local_rd_values;
           $seconds      = $tm->local_rd_as_seconds;

           $integer      = $tm1 <=> $tm2;

           $boolean      = $tm1 == $tm2;
           $boolean      = $tm1 != $tm2;
           $boolean      = $tm1 <  $tm2;
           $boolean      = $tm1 >  $tm2;
           $boolean      = $tm1 <= $tm2;
           $boolean      = $tm1 >= $tm2;

           $string       = "$tm";

DESCRIPTION

       "Time::Moment" is an immutable object representing a date and time of day with an offset
       from UTC in the ISO 8601 calendar system.

       Time is measured in nanoseconds since "0001-01-01T00Z". In "Time:Moment" leap seconds are
       ignored. It is assumed that there are exactly "86,400,000,000,000" nanoseconds per day.
       "Time::Moment" can represent all epoch integers from "-62,135,596,800" to
       "253,402,300,799"; this range suffices to measure times to nanosecond precision for any
       instant that is within "0001-01-01T00:00:00Z" to "9999-12-31T23:59:59Z".

CONSTRUCTORS

   new
           $tm = Time::Moment->new(
               year       => 2012,
               month      => 12,
               day        => 24,
               hour       => 15,
               minute     => 30,
               second     => 45,
               nanosecond => 123456789,
               offset     => 0,
           );

       Constructs an instance of "Time::Moment" from the given components.

       Parameters:

       year
           The year [1, 9999].

       month
           The month of the year [1, 12].

       day The day of the month [1, 31]. The day must be valid for the year and month, otherwise
           an exception is raised.

       hour
           The hour of the day [0, 23].

       minute
           The minute of the hour [0, 59].

       second
           The second of the minute [0, 59].

       nanosecond
           The nanosecond of the second [0, 999_999_999].

       offset
           The offset from UTC in minutes [-1080, 1080] (±18:00).

   now
           $tm = Time::Moment->now;

       Constructs an instance of "Time::Moment" that is set to the current date and time from the
       system clock in the system time zone, with the offset set to the system's time zone offset
       from UTC.

   now_utc
           $tm = Time::Moment->now_utc;

       Constructs an instance of "Time::Moment" that is set to the current date and time from the
       system clock in the UTC time zone.

   from_epoch
           $tm = Time::Moment->from_epoch($seconds);
           $tm = Time::Moment->from_epoch($seconds, $nanosecond);
           $tm = Time::Moment->from_epoch($seconds [, nanosecond => 0] [, precision => 6]);

       Constructs an instance of "Time::Moment" from the given seconds from the epoch of
       1970-01-01T00Z. Fractional seconds is supported if the constructor is invoked with seconds
       only, the default precision is 6 (microseconds).

       Parameters:

       nanosecond
               $tm = Time::Moment->from_epoch($seconds, nanosecond => 0);

           The optional parameter nanosecond [0, 999_999_999] specifies the nanosecond of the
           second.

       precision
               $tm = Time::Moment->from_epoch($seconds, precision => 6);

           The optional parameter precision [0, 9] specifies the precision of the fractional
           seconds. The default precision is 6 (microseconds).

   from_object
           $tm = Time::Moment->from_object($object);

       Constructs an instance of "Time::Moment" from the given object. If the given object is an
       instance of "Time::Moment" it's returned otherwise an attempt is made to coerce the given
       object to an instance of "Time::Moment".

       "Time::Moment" implements coercion handlers for the following object types:

       DateTime
               $tm = Time::Moment->from_object( DateTime->now );

           The given "DateTime" object must be within the supported range and must have a time
           zone or an offset from UTC, coercing from the 'floating' time zone is not supported.

       Time::Piece
               $tm = Time::Moment->from_object( scalar Time::Piece::localtime() );

           The given "Time::Piece" object must be within the supported date range.

       The coercion scheme is extensible and implemented as documented in Params::Coerce:

           $tm = Params::Coerce::coerce('Time::Moment', scalar Time::Piece::localtime());
           $tm = Params::Coerce::coerce('Time::Moment', DateTime->now);

       "Time::Moment" also implements a coercion handler from "Time::Moment" to "DateTime" and
       "Time::Piece":

           $dt = Params::Coerce::coerce('DateTime', Time::Moment->now);
           $tp = Params::Coerce::coerce('Time::Piece', Time::Moment->now);

   from_string
           $tm = Time::Moment->from_string($string);
           $tm = Time::Moment->from_string($string [, lenient => false]);

       Constructs an instance of "Time::Moment" from the given string. The string must consist of
       a complete date representation and time of day followed by a zone designator. The time of
       day may be reduced to hour of the day, the second of the minute may have a decimal
       fraction. The decimal sign can be either the comma [,] or the full stop [.]. A decimal
       fraction must have at least one digit and may have a total of nine digits, if the
       fractional precision is greater than nine digits, the value will be truncated.

       The following are examples of complete date and time of day representations:

           Basic format:                 Example:
           YYYYMMDDThhmmssZ              20121224T121530Z
           YYYYMMDDThhmmss±hhmm          20121224T121530+0100
           YYYYMMDDThhmmss±hh            20121224T121530+01

           YYYYMMDDThhmmss.ssZ           20121224T121530.500Z
           YYYYMMDDThhmmss.ss±hhmm       20121224T121530.500+0100
           YYYYMMDDThhmmss.ss±hh         20121224T121530.500+01

           YYYYMMDDThhZ                  20121224T12Z              (reduced accuracy)
           YYYYMMDDThhmmZ                20121224T1215Z            (reduced accuracy)
           YYYYMMDDThhmm±hhmm            20121224T1215+0100        (reduced accuracy)
           YYYYMMDDThhmm±hh              20121224T1215+01          (reduced accuracy)

           Extended format:              Example:
           YYYY-MM-DDThh:mm:ssZ          2012-12-24T12:15:30Z
           YYYY-MM-DDThh:mm:ss±hh:mm     2012-12-24T12:15:30+01:00
           YYYY-MM-DDThh:mm:ss±hh        2012-12-24T12:15:30+01

           YYYY-MM-DDThh:mm:ss.ssZ       2012-12-24T12:15:30.500Z
           YYYY-MM-DDThh:mm:ss.ss±hh:mm  2012-12-24T12:15:30.500+01:00
           YYYY-MM-DDThh:mm:ss.ss±hh     2012-12-24T12:15:30.500+01

           YYYY-MM-DDThhZ                2012-12-24T12Z            (reduced accuracy)
           YYYY-MM-DDThh:mmZ             2012-12-24T12:15Z         (reduced accuracy)
           YYYY-MM-DDThh:mm±hh:mm        2012-12-24T12:15+01:00    (reduced accuracy)
           YYYY-MM-DDThh:mm±hh           2012-12-24T12:15+01       (reduced accuracy)

       Where representations using calendar dates are shown, ordinal dates or week dates may be
       substituted. This ISO 8601 profile correspond to a subset of ISO 8601:2004 4.3 Date and
       time of day.

       If the optional boolean parameter lenient is true, the following examples are also
       accepted:

           YYYY-MM-DD hh:mm:ssZ          2012-12-24 12:15:30Z
           YYYY-MM-DD hh:mm:ssz          2012-12-24 12:15:30z
           YYYY-MM-DD hh:mm:ss±hhmm      2012-12-24 12:15:30+0100
           YYYY-MM-DD hh:mm:ss±hh:mm     2012-12-24 12:15:30+01:00
           YYYY-MM-DD hh:mm:ss±hh        2012-12-24 12:15:30+01

           YYYY-MM-DD hh:mm:ss.ssZ       2012-12-24 12:15:30.500Z
           YYYY-MM-DD hh:mm:ss.ssz       2012-12-24 12:15:30.500z
           YYYY-MM-DD hh:mm:ss.ss±hhmm   2012-12-24 12:15:30.500+0100
           YYYY-MM-DD hh:mm:ss.ss±hh:mm  2012-12-24 12:15:30.500+01:00
           YYYY-MM-DD hh:mm:ss.ss±hh     2012-12-24 12:15:30.500+01

           YYYY-MM-DD hh:mmZ             2012-12-24 12:15Z
           YYYY-MM-DD hh:mmz             2012-12-24 12:15z
           YYYY-MM-DD hh:mm±hhmm         2012-12-24 12:15+0100
           YYYY-MM-DD hh:mm±hh:mm        2012-12-24 12:15+01:00
           YYYY-MM-DD hh:mm±hh           2012-12-24 12:15+01

           YYYY-MM-DD hh:mm:ss ±hh:mm    2012-12-24 12:15:30 +01:00
           YYYY-MM-DD hh:mm:ss ±hhmm     2012-12-24 12:15:30 +0100
           YYYY-MM-DD hh:mm:ss ±hh       2012-12-24 12:15:30 +01
           YYYY-MM-DD hh:mm:ss GMT       2012-12-24 12:15:30 GMT
           YYYY-MM-DD hh:mm:ss GMT±hh    2012-12-24 12:15:30 GMT+01
           YYYY-MM-DD hh:mm:ss UTC       2012-12-24 12:15:30 UTC
           YYYY-MM-DD hh:mm:ss UTC±hh    2012-12-24 12:15:30 UTC+01

           YYYY-MM-DD hh:mm:ss.ss ±hhmm  2012-12-24 12:15:30.500 +0100
           YYYY-MM-DD hh:mm:ss.ss ±hh:mm 2012-12-24 12:15:30.500 +01:00
           YYYY-MM-DD hh:mm:ss.ss ±hh    2012-12-24 12:15:30.500 +01

           YYYY-MM-DD hh:mm ±hh:mm       2012-12-24 12:15 +01:00
           YYYY-MM-DD hh:mm ±hhmm        2012-12-24 12:15 +0100
           YYYY-MM-DD hh:mm ±hh          2012-12-24 12:15 +01

       The string representation may consist of a mixture of the basic format and the extended
       format. The time designator [T] may be in lower case [t] or replaced with a single space.
       A single space is also accepted between the time of day and the zone designator. The UTC
       designator [Z] may also be in lower case [z]. The literal string GMT or UTC may be used as
       a UTC designator and may have an offset. Usage of these string representations is strongly
       discouraged as they do not conform to the ISO 8601 standard.

   from_rd
           $tm = Time::Moment->from_rd($rd);
           $tm = Time::Moment->from_rd($rd [, offset => 0] [, precision => 3] [, epoch => 0]);

       Constructs an instance of "Time::Moment" from the given Rata Die.  The Rata Die is a count
       of days elapsed since 0000-12-31T00. The fractional part corresponds to the fraction of
       the day after midnight.  The minimum acceptable Rata Die is 1 which corresponds to
       0001-01-01T00.

       Parameters:

       offset
               $tm = Time::Moment->from_rd($rd, offset => 0);

           The optional parameter offset [-1080, 1080] (±18:00) specifies the offset from UTC in
           minutes. The default offset is 0.

       precision
               $tm = Time::Moment->from_rd($rd, precision => 3);

           The optional parameter precision [0, 9] specifies the precision of the fractional
           seconds. The default precision is 3 (milliseconds).

       epoch
               $tm = Time::Moment->from_rd($rd, epoch => 0);

           The optional parameter epoch specifies the epoch date relative to 0000-12-31T00. The
           epoch date for the Rata Die is 0.

   from_jd
           $tm = Time::Moment->from_jd($jd);
           $tm = Time::Moment->from_jd($jd [, precision => 3] [, epoch => -1721424.5]);

       Constructs an instance of "Time::Moment" from the given Julian Date.  The Julian Date is a
       count of days elapsed since -4713-11-24T12Z. The fractional part corresponds to the
       fraction of the day after noon. The minimum acceptable Julian Date is 1721425.5 which
       corresponds to 0001-01-01T00Z.

       Parameters:

       precision
               $tm = Time::Moment->from_jd($jd, precision => 3);

           The optional parameter precision [0, 9] specifies the precision of the fractional
           seconds. The default precision is 3 (milliseconds).

       epoch
               $tm = Time::Moment->from_jd($jd, epoch => -1721424.5);

           The optional parameter epoch specifies the epoch date relative to 0000-12-31T00Z. The
           epoch date for the Julian Date is "-1721424.5".

   from_mjd
           $tm = Time::Moment->from_mjd($mjd);
           $tm = Time::Moment->from_mjd($mjd [, precision => 3] [, epoch => 678576]);

       Constructs an instance of "Time::Moment" from the given Modified Julian Date. The Modified
       Julian Date is a count of days elapsed since 1858-11-17T00Z. The fractional part
       corresponds to the fraction of the day after midnight. The minimum acceptable Modified
       Julian Date is "-678575" which corresponds to 0001-01-01T00Z.

       Parameters:

       precision
               $tm = Time::Moment->from_mjd($mjd, precision => 3);

           The optional parameter precision [0, 9] specifies the precision of the fractional
           seconds. The default precision is 3 (milliseconds).

       epoch
               $tm = Time::Moment->from_mjd($mjd, epoch => 678576);

           The optional parameter epoch specifies the epoch date relative to 0000-12-31T00Z. The
           epoch date for the Modified Julian Date is 678576.

INSTANCE METHODS

   year
           $year = $tm->year;

       Returns the year [1, 9999].

   quarter
           $quarter = $tm->quarter;

       Returns the quarter of the year [1, 4].

   month
           $month = $tm->month;

       Returns the month of the year [1, 12].

   week
           $week = $tm->week;

       Returns the week of the year [1, 53].

   day_of_year
           $day = $tm->day_of_year;

       Returns the day of the year [1, 366].

   day_of_quarter
           $day = $tm->day_of_quarter;

       Returns the day of the quarter [1, 92].

   day_of_month
           $day = $tm->day_of_month;

       Returns the day of the month [1, 31].

   day_of_week
           $day = $tm->day_of_week;

       Returns the day of the week [1=Monday, 7=Sunday].

   hour
           $hour = $tm->hour;

       Returns the hour of the day [0, 23].

   minute
           $minute = $tm->minute;

       Returns the minute of the hour [0, 59].

   minute_of_day
           $minute = $tm->minute_of_day;

       Returns the minute of the day [0, 1439].

   second
           $second = $tm->second;

       Returns the second of the minute [0, 59].

   second_of_day
           $second = $tm->second_of_day;

       Returns the second of the day [0, 86_399].

   millisecond
           $millisecond = $tm->millisecond;

       Returns the millisecond of the second [0, 999].

   millisecond_of_day
           $millisecond = $tm->millisecond_of_day;

       Returns the millisecond of the day [0, 86_399_999].

   microsecond
           $microsecond = $tm->microsecond;

       Returns the microsecond of the second [0, 999_999].

   microsecond_of_day
           $microsecond = $tm->microsecond_of_day;

       Returns the microsecond of the day [0, 86_399_999_999].

   nanosecond
           $nanosecond = $tm->nanosecond;

       Returns the nanosecond of the second [0, 999_999_999].

   nanosecond_of_day
           $nanosecond = $tm->nanosecond_of_day;

       Returns the nanosecond of the day [0, 86_399_999_999_999].

   epoch
           $epoch = $tm->epoch;

       Returns the number of integral seconds from the epoch of 1970-01-01T00Z.

   offset
           $offset = $tm->offset;

       Returns the offset from UTC in minutes [-1080, 1080] (±18:00).

   precision
           $precision = $tm->precision;

       Returns the precision of the time of the day [-3, 9]. Please see with_precision for an
       explanation of the returned precision value.

   jd
           $jd = $tm->jd;
           $jd = $tm->jd([precision => 3]);

       Returns the Julian Date. The Julian Date is a count of days elapsed since -4713-11-24T12Z.
       The fractional part corresponds to the fraction of the day after noon. The optional named
       parameter precision [0, 9] specifies the precision of the fractional seconds. The default
       precision is 3 (milliseconds).

   mjd
           $mjd = $tm->mjd;
           $mjd = $tm->mjd([precision => 3]);

       Returns the Modified Julian Date. The Modified Julian Date is a count of days elapsed
       since 1858-11-17T00Z. The fractional part corresponds to the fraction of the day after
       midnight. The optional named parameter precision [0, 9] specifies the precision of the
       fractional seconds. The default precision is 3 (milliseconds).

   rd
           $rd = $tm->rd;
           $rd = $tm->rd([precision => 3]);

       Returns the Rata Die. The Rata Die is a count of days elapsed since 0000-12-31T00. The
       fractional part corresponds to the fraction of the day after midnight. The optional named
       parameter precision [0, 9] specifies the precision of the fractional seconds. The default
       precision is 3 (milliseconds).

   with
           $tm2 = $tm1->with($adjuster);

       Returns a copy of this instance adjusted by the given adjuster. The adjuster is a CODE
       reference invoked with an instance of Time::Moment and is expected to return an instance
       of Time::Moment. Please see Time::Moment::Adjusters for available adjusters.

   with_year
           $tm2 = $tm1->with_year($year);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given year [1, 9999] altered. The day of the
       month of the date is unchanged unless the day does not exist in the month. In that case,
       the day is set to the last day of the month.

   with_quarter
           $tm2 = $tm1->with_quarter($quarter);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given quarter of the year [1, 4] altered. The day
       of the month of the date is unchanged unless the day does not exist in the month of the
       quarter. In that case, the day is set to the last day of the month.

   with_month
           $tm2 = $tm1->with_month($month);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given month of the year [1, 12] altered. The day
       of the month of the date is unchanged unless the day does not exist in the given month. In
       that case, the day is set to the last day of the given month.

   with_week
           $tm2 = $tm1->with_week($week);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given week of the year [1, 53] altered. The week
       must be valid for the year, otherwise an exception is raised.

   with_day_of_year
           $tm2 = $tm1->with_day_of_year($day);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given day of the year [1, 366] altered. The day
       must be valid for the year, otherwise an exception is raised.

   with_day_of_quarter
           $tm2 = $tm1->with_day_of_quarter($day);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given day of the quarter [1, 92] altered. The day
       must be valid for the year and quarter, otherwise an exception is raised.

   with_day_of_month
           $tm2 = $tm1->with_day_of_month($day);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given day of the month [1, 31] altered. The day
       must be valid for the year and month, otherwise an exception is raised.

   with_day_of_week
           $tm2 = $tm1->with_day_of_week($day);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given day of the week [1=Monday, 7=Sunday]
       altered.

   with_hour
           $tm2 = $tm1->with_hour($hour);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given hour of the day [0, 23] altered.

   with_minute
           $tm2 = $tm1->with_minute($minute);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given minute of the hour [0, 59] altered.

   with_minute_of_day
           $tm2 = $tm1->with_minute_of_day($minute);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given minute of the day [0, 1439] altered, any
       lower-order time elements is unaltered.

   with_second
           $tm2 = $tm1->with_second($second);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given second of the minute [0, 59] altered.

   with_second_of_day
           $tm2 = $tm1->with_second_of_day($second);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given second of the day [0, 86_399] altered, any
       lower-order time elements is unaltered.

   with_millisecond
           $tm2 = $tm1->with_millisecond($millisecond);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given millisecond of the second [0, 999] altered.
       The nanosecond of the second is replaced with the given millisecond multiplied by
       1,000,000.

   with_millisecond_of_day
           $tm2 = $tm1->with_millisecond_of_day($millisecond);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given millisecond of the day [0, 86_400_000]
       altered. A millisecond value of 86_400_000 (T24:00) is normalized to midnight of the
       following day, any lower-order time elements is truncated.

   with_microsecond
           $tm2 = $tm1->with_microsecond($microsecond);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given microsecond of the second [0, 999_999]
       altered. The nanosecond of the second is replaced with the given microsecond multiplied by
       1,000.

   with_microsecond_of_day
           $tm2 = $tm1->with_microsecond_of_day($microsecond);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given microsecond of the day [0, 86_400_000_000]
       altered. A microsecond value of 86_400_000_000 (T24:00) is normalized to midnight of the
       following day, any lower-order time elements is truncated.

   with_nanosecond
           $tm2 = $tm1->with_nanosecond($nanosecond);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given nanosecond of the second [0, 999_999_999]
       altered.

   with_nanosecond_of_day
           $tm2 = $tm1->with_nanosecond_of_day($nanosecond);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given nanosecond of the day [0,
       86_400_000_000_000] altered. A nanosecond value of 86_400_000_000_000 (T24:00) is
       normalized to midnight of the following day.

   with_offset_same_instant
           $tm2 = $tm1->with_offset_same_instant($offset);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given offset from UTC in minutes [-1080, 1080]
       (±18:00) altered. The resulting time is at the same instant.

           $tm = Time::Moment->from_string('2012-12-24T15-05')
                             ->with_offset_same_instant(0);
           say $tm; # 2012-12-24T20Z

   with_offset_same_local
           $tm2 = $tm1->with_offset_same_local($offset);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given offset from UTC in minutes [-1080, 1080]
       (±18:00) altered. The resulting time has the same local time.

           $tm = Time::Moment->from_string('2012-12-24T15-05')
                             ->with_offset_same_local(0);
           say $tm; # 2012-12-24T15Z

   with_precision
           $tm2 = $tm1->with_precision($precision);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the time of the day altered to the given precision
       [-3, 9]. A precision value between [0, 9] alters the precision of the fractional seconds.
       A precision of "-1" truncates to minute of the hour; "-2" truncates to hour of the day;
       "-3" truncates to midnight of the day.

           $tm = Time::Moment->from_string('2012-12-24T12:30:45.123456789Z');
           say $tm->with_precision(6);  # T12:30:45.123456Z
           say $tm->with_precision(3);  # T12:30:45.123Z
           say $tm->with_precision(0);  # T12:30:45Z
           say $tm->with_precision(-1); # T12:30:00Z
           say $tm->with_precision(-2); # T12:00:00Z
           say $tm->with_precision(-3); # T00:00:00Z

   plus_years
           $tm2 = $tm1->plus_years($years);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given number of years added. The day of the month
       of the date is unchanged unless the day does not exist in the resulting month. In that
       case, the day is set to the last day of the resulting month. For example, 2012-02-29 plus
       one year results in 2013-02-28.

   plus_months
           $tm2 = $tm1->plus_months($months);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given number of months added. The day of the
       month of the date is unchanged unless the day does not exist in the resulting month. In
       that case, the day is set to the last day of the resulting month. For example, 2013-01-31
       plus one month results in 2013-02-28; 2013-02-28 plus one month results in 2013-03-28.

   plus_weeks
           $tm2 = $tm1->plus_weeks($weeks);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given number of weeks added.

   plus_days
           $tm2 = $tm1->plus_days($days);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given number of days added.

   plus_hours
           $tm2 = $tm1->plus_hours($hours);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given number of hours added.

   plus_minutes
           $tm2 = $tm1->plus_minutes($minutes);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given number of minutes added.

   plus_seconds
           $tm2 = $tm1->plus_seconds($seconds);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given number of seconds added.

   plus_milliseconds
           $tm2 = $tm1->plus_milliseconds($milliseconds);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given number of milliseconds added.

   plus_microseconds
           $tm2 = $tm1->plus_microseconds($microseconds);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given number of microseconds added.

   plus_nanoseconds
           $tm2 = $tm1->plus_nanoseconds($nanoeconds);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given number of nanoseconds added.

   minus_years
           $tm2 = $tm1->minus_years($years);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given number of years subtracted.  The day of the
       month of the date is unchanged unless the day does not exist in the resulting month. In
       that case, the day is set to the last day of the resulting month. For example, 2012-02-29
       minus one year results in 2011-02-28.

   minus_months
           $tm2 = $tm1->minus_months($months);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given number of months subtracted.  The day of
       the month of the date is unchanged unless the day does not exist in the resulting month.
       In that case, the day is set to the last day of the resulting month. For example,
       2013-03-31 minus one month results in 2013-02-28; 2013-02-28 minus one month results in
       2013-01-28.

   minus_weeks
           $tm2 = $tm1->minus_weeks($weeks);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given number of weeks subtracted.

   minus_days
           $tm2 = $tm1->minus_days($days);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given number of days subtracted.

   minus_hours
           $tm2 = $tm1->minus_hours($hours);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given number of hours subtracted.

   minus_minutes
           $tm2 = $tm1->minus_minutes($minutes);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given number of minutes subtracted.

   minus_seconds
           $tm2 = $tm1->minus_seconds($seconds);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given number of seconds subtracted.

   minus_milliseconds
           $tm2 = $tm1->minus_milliseconds($milliseconds);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given number of milliseconds subtracted.

   minus_microseconds
           $tm2 = $tm1->minus_microseconds($microseconds);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given number of microseconds subtracted.

   minus_nanoseconds
           $tm2 = $tm1->minus_nanoseconds($nanoseconds);

       Returns a copy of this instance with the given number of nanoseconds subtracted.

   delta_years
           $years = $tm->delta_years($other);

       Returns the difference between the local date of this moment and the other in terms of
       complete years. The result will be negative if the local date of the other moment is
       before this.

   delta_months
           $months = $tm->delta_months($other);

       Returns the difference between the local date of this moment and the other in terms of
       complete months. The result will be negative if the local date of the other moment is
       before this.

   delta_weeks
           $weeks = $tm->delta_weeks($other);

       Returns the difference between the local date of this moment and the other in terms of
       complete weeks. The result will be negative if the local date of the other moment is
       before this.

   delta_days
           $days = $tm->delta_days($other);

       Returns the difference between the local date of this moment and the other in terms of
       complete days. The result will be negative if the local date of the other moment is before
       this.

   delta_hours
           $hours = $tm->delta_hours($other);

       Returns the difference between the instant of this moment and the other in terms of
       complete hours. The result will be negative if the instant of the other moment is before
       this.

   delta_minutes
           $minutes = $tm->delta_minutes($other);

       Returns the difference between the instant of this moment and the other in terms of
       complete minutes. The result will be negative if the instant of the other moment is before
       this.

   delta_seconds
           $seconds = $tm->delta_seconds($other);

       Returns the difference between the instant of this moment and the other in terms of
       complete seconds. The result will be negative if the instant of the other moment is before
       this.

   delta_milliseconds
           $milliseconds = $tm->delta_milliseconds($other);

       Returns the difference between the instant of this moment and the other in terms of
       complete milliseconds. The result will be negative if the instant of the other moment is
       before this.

   delta_microseconds
           $microseconds = $tm->delta_microseconds($other);

       Returns the difference between the instant of this moment and the other in terms of
       complete microseconds. The result will be negative if the instant of the other moment is
       before this.

   delta_nanoseconds
           $nanoseconds = $tm->delta_nanoseconds($other);

       Returns the difference between the instant of this moment and the other in terms of
       complete nanoseconds. The result will be negative if the instant of the other moment is
       before this.

   at_utc
           $tm2 = $tm1->at_utc;

       Returns a copy of this instance with the offset from UTC set to zero. This method is
       equivalent to:

           $tm2 = $tm1->with_offset_same_instant(0);

   at_midnight
           $tm2 = $tm1->at_midnight;

       Returns a copy of this instance with the time of day set to midnight, T00:00:00.0. This
       method is equivalent to:

           $tm2 = $tm1->with_hour(0)
                      ->with_minute(0)
                      ->with_second(0)
                      ->with_nanosecond(0);

   at_noon
           $tm2 = $tm1->at_noon;

       Returns a copy of this instance with the time of day set to noon, T12:00:00.0. This method
       is equivalent to:

           $tm2 = $tm1->with_hour(12)
                      ->with_minute(0)
                      ->with_second(0)
                      ->with_nanosecond(0);

   at_last_day_of_year
           $tm2 = $tm1->at_last_day_of_year;

       Returns a copy of this instance with the date adjusted to the last day of the year, the
       time of the day is unaltered.

   at_last_day_of_quarter
           $tm2 = $tm1->at_last_day_of_quarter;

       Returns a copy of this instance with the date adjusted to the last day of the quarter, the
       time of the day is unaltered.

   at_last_day_of_month
           $tm2 = $tm1->at_last_day_of_month;

       Returns a copy of this instance with the date adjusted to the last day of the month, the
       time of the day is unaltered.

   is_before
           $boolean = $tm->is_before($other);

       Returns a boolean indicating whether or not the instant of this time is before the other
       time.

   is_after
           $boolean = $tm->is_after($other);

       Returns a boolean indicating whether or not the instant of this time is after the other
       time.

   is_equal
           $boolean = $tm->is_equal($other);

       Returns a boolean indicating whether or not the instant of this time is equal the other
       time.

   compare
           $integer = $tm->compare($other);
           $integer = $tm->compare($other [, precision => 9]);

       Returns an integer indicating whether the instant of this time is before, after or equal
       the other time. Returns a value less than zero if this time is before the other; zero if
       this date is equal the other time; a value greater than zero if this time is after the
       other time. The optional parameter precision [-3, 9] specifies the precision of the
       comparison. The default precision is 9 (nanoseconds). Please see with_precision for an
       explanation of the precision value.

   is_leap_year
           $boolean = $tm->is_leap_year;

       Returns a boolean indicating whether or not the year of the local date of this moment is a
       leap year.

   to_string
           $string = $tm->to_string;
           $string = $tm->to_string([reduced => false]);

       Returns a string representation of the instance. If the optional named boolean parameter
       reduced is true a shorter representation is attempted.

       The string will be in one of the following representations:

           YYYY-MM-DDThh:mm                (only if reduced => true)
           YYYY-MM-DDThh:mm:ss
           YYYY-MM-DDThh:mm:ss.fff
           YYYY-MM-DDThh:mm:ss.ffffff
           YYYY-MM-DDThh:mm:ss.fffffffff

       Followed by a zone designator in one of the following representations:

           Z
           ±hh                             (only if reduced => true)
           ±hh:mm

       The shortest representation will be used where the omitted parts are implied to be zero.

   strftime
           $string = $tm->strftime($format);

       Formats time according to the conversion specifications in the given $format string. The
       format string consists of zero or more conversion specifications and ordinary characters.
       All ordinary characters are copied directly into the resulting string. A conversion
       specification consists of a percent sign "%" and one other character.

       The following conversion specifications are supported:

       %a  Replaced by the C locale's abbreviated day of the week name.  Example: Mon, Tue, ...,
           Sun.

       %A  Replaced by the C locale's full day of the week name.  Example: Monday, Tuesday, ...,
           Sunday.

       %b  Replaced by the C locale's abbreviated month name.  Example: Jan, Feb, ..., Dec.

       %B  Replaced by the C locale's full month name.  Example: January, February, ...,
           December.

       %c  Replaced by the C locale's date and time representation.  Equivalent to "%a %b %e
           %H:%M:%S %Y".

       %C  Replaced by the year divided by 100 and truncated to an integer, as a decimal number
           [00, 99].

       %d  Replaced by the day of the month as a decimal number [01, 31].

       %D  Equivalent to "%m/%d/%y".

       %e  Replaced by the day of the month as a decimal number [1, 31]; a single digit is
           preceded by a space.

       %f  Replaced by the fractional second including the preceding decimal point or by an empty
           string if no fractional seconds are present. This conversion specification permits use
           of an optional maximum field width [0, 9] where the default field width of 0 will use
           the shortest of the following representations:

               .fff        (millisecond)
               .ffffff     (microsecond)
               .fffffffff  (nanosecond)

           Example:

               $tm = Time::Moment->from_string('2012-12-24T15:30:45.123456Z');
               $tm->strftime('%f');    # '.123456'
               $tm->strftime('%3f');   # '.123'
               $tm->strftime('%9f');   # '.123456000'

               $tm = Time::Moment->from_string('2012-12-24T15:30:45Z');
               $tm->strftime('%f');    # ''
               $tm->strftime('%3f');   # ''

           %3f is replaced by decimal point and exactly three fractional digits (zero-padded on
           the right or truncated if needed) if fractional seconds are present.

           This conversion specification is an extension to the "IEEE Std 1003.1"
           <http://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/functions/strftime.html>.

       %F  Equivalent to "%Y-%m-%d".

       %g  Replaced by the last 2 digits of the year of the week as a decimal number [00, 99].

       %G  Replaced by the week-based year as a decimal number [0001, 9999].

       %h  Equivalent to %b.

       %H  Replaced by the hour of day (24-hour clock) as a decimal number [00, 23].

       %I  Replaced by the hour of day (12-hour clock) as a decimal number [01, 12].

       %j  Replaced by the day of the year as a decimal number [001, 366].

       %k  Replaced by the hour of day (24-hour clock) as a decimal number [1, 23]; a single
           digit is preceded by a space.

           This conversion specification is an extension to the "IEEE Std 1003.1"
           <http://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/functions/strftime.html>.

       %l  Replaced by the hour of day (12-hour clock) as a decimal number [1, 12]; a single
           digit is preceded by a space.

           This conversion specification is an extension to the "IEEE Std 1003.1"
           <http://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/functions/strftime.html>.

       %m  Replaced by the month of the year as a decimal number [01, 12].

       %M  Replaced by the minute of hour as a decimal number [00, 59].

       %n  Replaced by a <newline> character.

       %N  Replaced by the fractional second as a decimal number. This conversion specification
           permits use of an optional maximum field width [0, 9] where the default field width of
           0 will use the shortest of the following representations:

               fff        (millisecond)
               ffffff     (microsecond)
               fffffffff  (nanosecond)

           Example:

               $tm = Time::Moment->from_string('2012-12-24T15:30:45.123456Z');
               $tm->strftime('%N');    # '123456'
               $tm->strftime('%3N');   # '123'
               $tm->strftime('%9N');   # '123456000'

           %3N is replaced by exactly three fractional digits (zero-padded on the right or
           truncated if needed).

           This conversion specification is an extension to the "IEEE Std 1003.1"
           <http://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/functions/strftime.html>.

       %p  Replaced by the C locale's meridian notation. Example: AM, PM.

       %r  Replaced by the C locale's time in a.m. and p.m. notation. Equivalent to "%I:%M:%S
           %p".

       %R  Replaced by the time in 24-hour notation. Equivalent to "%H:%M".

       %s  Replaced by the number of seconds from the epoch of 1970-01-01T00:00:00Z as a decimal
           number.

           This conversion specification is an extension to the "IEEE Std 1003.1"
           <http://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/functions/strftime.html>.

       %S  Replaced by the second of hour as a decimal number [00, 59].

       %t  Replaced by a <tab> character.

       %T  Replaced by the time of day. Equivalent to "%H:%M:%S".

       %u  Replaced by the day of the week as a decimal number [1, 7], with 1 representing
           Monday.

       %U  Replaced by the week number of the year as a decimal number [00, 53]. The first Sunday
           of January is the first day of week 1; days in the new year before this are in week 0.

       %V  Replaced by the week number of the year (Monday as the first day of the week) as a
           decimal number [01, 53]. If the week containing 1 January has four or more days in the
           new year, then it is considered week 1. Otherwise, it is the last week of the previous
           year, and the next week is week 1. Both January 4th and the first Thursday of January
           are always in week 1.

       %w  Replaced by the day of the week as a decimal number [0, 6], with 0 representing
           Sunday.

       %W  Replaced by the week number of the year as a decimal number [00, 53]. The first Monday
           of January is the first day of week 1; days in the new year before this are in week 0.

       %x  Replaced by the C locale's date representation. Equivalent to "%m/%d/%y".

       %X  Replaced by the C locale's time representation. Equivalent to "%H:%M:%S".

       %y  Replaced by the last two digits of the year as a decimal number [00, 99].

       %Y  Replaced by the year as a decimal number [0001, 9999].

       %z  Replaced by the offset from UTC in the ISO 8601 basic format (±hhmm).

       %:z Replaced by the offset from UTC in the ISO 8601 extended format (±hh:mm).

       %Z  Replaced by the offset from UTC in the ISO 8601 extended format or by UTC designator
           (±hh:mm or Z).

       "%%"
           Replaced by %.

   length_of_year
           $integer = $tm->length_of_year;

       Returns the length of the year in days [365, 366].

   length_of_quarter
           $integer = $tm->length_of_quarter;

       Returns the length of the quarter of the year in days [90, 92].

   length_of_month
           $integer = $tm->length_of_month;

       Returns the length of the month of the year in days [28, 31].

   length_of_week_year
           $integer = $tm->length_of_week_year;

       Returns the length of the week of the year in weeks [52, 53].

   utc_rd_values
           ($rdn, $sod, $nanosecond) = $tm->utc_rd_values;

       Returns a list of three elements:

       $rdn
           The number of integral days from the Rata Die epoch of 0000-12-31.

       $sod
           The second of the day [0, 86_399].

       $nanosecond
           The nanosecond of the second [0, 999_999_999].

   utc_rd_as_seconds
           $seconds = $tm->utc_rd_as_seconds;

       Returns the number of integral seconds from the Rata Die epoch of 0000-12-31T00:00:00Z.

   local_rd_values
           ($rdn, $sod, $nanosecond) = $tm->local_rd_values;

       Returns a list of three elements:

       $rdn
           The number of integral days from the Rata Die epoch of 0000-12-31.

       $sod
           The second of the day [0, 86_399].

       $nanosecond
           The nanosecond of the second [0, 999_999_999].

   local_rd_as_seconds
           $seconds = $tm->local_rd_as_seconds;

       Returns the number of integral seconds from the Rata Die epoch of 0000-12-31T00:00:00.

OVERLOADED OPERATORS

   stringification
           $string = "$tm";

       The $string will be in one of the following representations:

           YYYY-MM-DDThh:mm:ss
           YYYY-MM-DDThh:mm:ss.fff
           YYYY-MM-DDThh:mm:ss.ffffff
           YYYY-MM-DDThh:mm:ss.fffffffff

       Followed by a zone designator in one of the following representations:

           Z
           ±hh:mm

       The shortest representation will be used where the omitted parts are implied to be zero.
       This representation is conformant with ISO 8601 profiles, such as:

       ·   RFC 3339 Date and Time on the Internet: Timestamps
           <http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3339>

       ·   RFC 4287 The Atom Syndication Format <http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4287#section-3.3>

       ·   W3C Date and Time Formats <http://www.w3.org/TR/NOTE-datetime>

       ·   HTML5 <http://www.w3.org/TR/html5/infrastructure.html#global-dates-and-times>

       ·   XML Schema <http://www.w3.org/TR/xmlschema-2/#dateTime>

       The "to_string" method or the "strftime" format string "%Y-%m-%dT%H:%M:%S%f%Z" produces an
       equivalent string representation:

           "$tm" eq $tm->to_string;
           "$tm" eq $tm->strftime("%Y-%m-%dT%H:%M:%S%f%Z");

       The total length of the string representation will be between 20 and 35 characters
       (inclusive).

   comparison
           $integer      = $tm1 <=> $tm2;

           $boolean      = $tm1 == $tm2;
           $boolean      = $tm1 != $tm2;
           $boolean      = $tm1 <  $tm2;
           $boolean      = $tm1 >  $tm2;
           $boolean      = $tm1 <= $tm2;
           $boolean      = $tm1 >= $tm2;

SERIALIZATION

   Storable
       The serialized representation of a "Time::Moment" is a string of 16 bytes that contains
       MAGIC (2 bytes), time zone offset from UTC (2 bytes), the number of days from Rata Die (4
       bytes), second of the day (4 bytes) and nanosecond of the second (4 bytes).

       The total size of the serialized "Time::Moment" instance using "nfreeze" is 34 bytes.

   JSON
       "Time::Moment" implements a "TO_JSON" method that returns the stringified representation
       of the instance.

   CBOR
       "Time::Moment" implements a "TO_CBOR" method that returns the stringified representation
       of the instance using tag 0 (standard date/time string).

       See CBOR::XS, RFC 7049 Section 2.4.1 <http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc7049#section-2.4.1>
       and "eg/cbor.pl" for an example how to roundtrip instances of "Time::Moment".

   Sereal
       Sereal version 2.030 or later implements support for the generic serialization protocol
       "FREEZE/THAW".

   FREEZE/THAW
       "Time::Moment" implements a "FREEZE" method that returns the stringified representation of
       the instance and a "THAW" method according to the serialization protocol specified in
       Types::Serialiser.

EXAMPLE FORMAT STRINGS

   ISO 8601 - Data elements and interchange formats
       Date

       Calendar date - 24 December 2012

           Basic format:               Example:
           %Y%m%d                      20121224
           %y%m                        201212      (reduced accuracy)

           Extended format:            Example:
           %Y-%m-%d                    2012-12-24
           %Y-%m                       2012-12     (reduced accuracy)

       Ordinal date - 24 December 2012

           Basic format:               Example:
           %Y%j                        2012359

           Extended format:            Example:
           %Y-%j                       2012-359

       Week date - Monday, 24 December 2012

           Basic format:               Example:
           %GW%V%u                     2012W521
           %GW%V                       2012W52     (reduced accuracy)

           Extended format:            Example:
           %G-W%V-%u                   2012-W52-1
           %G-W%V                      2012-W52    (reduced accuracy)

       Time of day

       Local time - 30 minutes and 45 seconds past 15 hours

           Basic format:               Example:
           %H%M%S                      153045
           %H%M                        1530        (reduced accuracy)

           Extended format:            Example:
           %H:%M:%S                    15:30:45
           %H:%M                       15:30       (reduced accuracy)

       Local time with decimal fractions - 30 minutes and 45 and a half second past 15 hours

           Basic format:               Example:
           %H%M%S%f                    153045.500
           %H%M%S.%1N                  153045.5

           Extended format:            Example:
           %H:%M:%S%f                  15:30:45.500
           %H:%M:%S.%1N                15:30:45.5

       Local time and the difference from UTC - 30 minutes and 45 seconds past 15 hours, one hour
       ahead of UTC

           Basic format:               Example:
           %H%M%S%z                    153045+0100

           Extended format:            Example:
           %H:%M:%S%Z                  15:30:45+01:00

       Date and time of day

       Combinations of calendar date and time of day

           Basic format:               Example:
           %Y%m%dT%H%M%S%z             20121224T153045+0100
           %Y%m%dT%H%M%S%f%z           20121224T153045.500+0100
           %Y%m%dT%H%M%z               20121224T1530+0100      (reduced accuracy)

           Extended format:            Example:
           %Y-%m-%dT%H:%M:%S%Z         2012-12-24T15:30:45+01:00
           %Y-%m-%dT%H:%M:%S%f%Z       2012-12-24T15:30:45.500+01:00
           %Y-%m-%dT%H:%M%Z            2012-12-24T15:30+01:00  (reduced accuracy)

       Combinations of ordinal date and time of day

           Basic format:               Example:
           %Y%jT%H%M%S%z               2012359T153045+0100
           %Y%jT%H%M%S%f%z             2012359T153045.500+0100
           %Y%jT%H%M%z                 2012359T1530+0100       (reduced accuracy)

           Extended format:            Example:
           %Y-%jT%H:%M:%S%Z            2012-359T15:30:45+01:00
           %Y-%jT%H:%M:%S%f%Z          2012-359T15:30:45.500+01:00
           %Y-%jT%H:%M%Z               2012-359T15:30+01:00    (reduced accuracy)

       Combinations of week date and time of day

           Basic format:               Example:
           %GW%V%uT%H%M%S%z            2012W521T153045+0100
           %GW%V%uT%H%M%S%f%z          2012W521T153045.500+0100
           %GW%V%uT%H%M%f%z            2012W521T1530+0100      (reduced accuracy)

           Extended format:            Example:
           %G-W%V-%uT%H:%M:%S%Z        2012-W52-1T15:30:45+01:00
           %G-W%V-%uT%H:%M:%S%f%Z      2012-W52-1T15:30:45.500+01:00
           %G-W%V-%uT%H:%M%Z           2012-W52-1T15:30+01:00  (reduced accuracy)

   ISO 9075 - Information technology - Database languages - SQL
       Literal values from Part 2: Foundation (SQL/Foundation)

           Date:                       Example:
           %Y-%m-%d                    2012-12-24

           Time:                       Example:
           %H:%M:%S                    15:30:45
           %H:%M:%S%f                  15:30:45.500

           Timestamp:                  Example:
           %Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S           2012-12-24 15:30:45
           %Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S %:z       2012-12-24 15:30:45 +01:00
           %Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S%f         2012-12-24 15:30:45.500
           %Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S%f %:z     2012-12-24 15:30:45.500 +01:00

   RFC 1123 - Requirements for Internet Hosts
       RFC 822 <http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc822#section-5> as updated by RFC 1123
       <http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc1123>.

           Format:                     Example:
           %a, %d %b %Y %H:%M:%S %z    Mon, 24 Dec 2012 15:30:45 +0100

   RFC 2616 - HTTP/1.1
       RFC 2616 - 3.3.1 Full Date <http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc2616#section-3.3.1>.

           Format:                     Example:
           %a, %d %b %Y %H:%M:%S GMT   Mon, 24 Dec 2012 14:30:45 GMT

       An HTTP date value represents time as an instance of UTC:

           $string = $tm->at_utc->strftime("%a, %d %b %Y %H:%M:%S GMT");

   RFC 5322 - Internet Message Format
       RFC 5322 - 3.3. Date and Time Specification
       <http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc5322#section-3.3>.

           Format:                     Example:
           %a, %d %b %Y %H:%M:%S %z    Mon, 24 Dec 2012 15:30:45 +0100
           %a, %d %b %Y %H:%M %z       Mon, 24 Dec 2012 15:30 +0100
           %d %b %Y %H:%M:%S %z        24 Dec 2012 15:30:45 +0100
           %d %b %Y %H:%M %z           24 Dec 2012 15:30 +0100

TIME ZONES

       An instance of "Time::Moment" represents an unambiguous point in time, but it's not time
       zone aware. When performing arithmetic on the local date/time or altering the components
       of the local date/time it may be necessary to use a time zone to convert to the correct
       representation.

       "Time::Moment" is API compatible with DateTime::TimeZone and DateTime::TimeZone::Tzfile.

   Converting from instant time to designated time zone
           $tm = Time::Moment->new(
               year   => 2012,
               month  => 12,
               day    => 24,
               hour   => 15
           );
           $zone   = DateTime::TimeZone->new(name => 'America/New_York');
           $offset = $zone->offset_for_datetime($tm) / 60;

           say $tm->with_offset_same_instant($offset); # 2012-12-24T10-05

   Converting from local time to designated time zone
           $tm = Time::Moment->new(
               year   => 2012,
               month  => 12,
               day    => 24,
               hour   => 15
           );
           $zone   = DateTime::TimeZone->new(name => 'America/New_York');
           $offset = $zone->offset_for_local_datetime($tm) / 60;

           say $tm->with_offset_same_local($offset); # 2012-12-24T15-05

   The Effect of Daylight Saving Time
       The time zone Europe/Brussels has 01:00 UTC as standard time, and 02:00 UTC as daylight
       savings time, with transition dates according to the European Summer Time
       <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Summer_Time_in_Europe>.

           $zone = DateTime::TimeZone->new(name => 'Europe/Brussels');

           sub convert_from_instant {
               my ($tm, $zone) = @_;
               my $offset = $zone->offset_for_datetime($tm) / 60;
               return $tm->with_offset_same_instant($offset);
           }

           sub convert_from_local {
               my ($tm, $zone) = @_;
               my $offset = $zone->offset_for_local_datetime($tm) / 60;
               return $tm->with_offset_same_local($offset);
           }

       European Summer Time begins (clocks go forward) at 01:00 UTC on the last Sunday in March,
       in 2014 the transition date was March 30.

           $tm1 = Time::Moment->from_string('2014-03-29T12+01');
           $tm2 = $tm1->plus_hours(24);
           say convert_from_instant($tm2, $zone); # 2014-03-30T13+02
           say convert_from_local($tm2, $zone);   # 2014-03-30T12+02

       During the transition from standard time to daylight savings time, the local time interval
       between 02:00:00 and 02:59:59 does not exist. Local time values in that interval are
       invalid. "DateTime::TimeZone" raises an exception when attempting to convert non-existing
       local time.

           $tm1 = Time::Moment->from_string('2014-03-29T22+01');
           $tm2 = $tm1->plus_hours(4);
           say convert_from_instant($tm2, $zone); # 2014-03-30T03+02
           say convert_from_local($tm2, $zone);   # raises an exception

       European Summer Time ends (clocks go backward) at 01:00 UTC on the last Sunday in October,
       in 2014 the transition date was October 26.

           $tm1 = Time::Moment->from_string('2014-10-25T12+02');
           $tm2 = $tm1->plus_hours(24);
           say convert_from_instant($tm2, $zone); # 2014-10-26T11+01
           say convert_from_local($tm2, $zone);   # 2014-10-26T12+01

       During the transition from daylight savings time to standard time, the local time interval
       between 02:00:00 and 02:59:59 is repeated. Local time values in that interval are
       ambiguous because they occur twice.  When "DateTime::TimeZone" converts an ambiguous local
       time it returns the numerically lowest offset (usually the standard one).

           $tm1 = Time::Moment->from_string('2014-10-25T22+02');
           $tm2 = $tm1->plus_hours(4);
           say convert_from_instant($tm2, $zone); # 2014-10-26T02+02
           say convert_from_local($tm2, $zone);   # 2014-10-26T02+01

DIAGNOSTICS

       (F) Usage: %s
           Method called with wrong number of arguments.

       (F) Parameter '%s' is out of range
       (F) Parameter '%s' is out of the range [%d, %d]
       (F) Cannot coerce object of type %s to Time::Moment
       (F) Could not parse the given string
       (F) %s is not an instance of Time::Moment
       (F) A %s object can only be compared to another %s object ('%s', '%s')

THREAD SAFETY

       "Time::Moment" is thread safe.

SEE ALSO

       DateTime

       Time::Piece

SUPPORT

   Bugs / Feature Requests
       Please report any bugs or feature requests through the issue tracker at
       <https://github.com/chansen/p5-time-moment/issues>.  You will be notified automatically of
       any progress on your issue.

   SOURCE CODE
       This is open source software. The code repository is available for public review and
       contribution under the terms of the license.

       <https://github.com/chansen/p5-time-moment>

           git clone https://github.com/chansen/p5-time-moment

AUTHOR

       Christian Hansen "chansen@cpan.org"

COPYRIGHT

       Copyright 2013-2017 by Christian Hansen.

       This is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the same terms as
       the Perl 5 programming language system itself.