Provided by: libxml-compile-perl_1.61-1_all bug

NAME

       XML::Compile::Schema::BuiltInTypes - Define handling of built-in data-types

INHERITANCE

        XML::Compile::Schema::BuiltInTypes
          is a Exporter

SYNOPSIS

        # Not for end-users
        use XML::Compile::Schema::BuiltInTypes qw/%builtin_types/;

DESCRIPTION

       Different schema specifications specify different available types, but there is a lot over
       overlap.  The XML::Compile::Schema::Specs module defines the availability, but here the
       types are implemented.

       This implementation certainly does not try to be minimal in size: following the letter of
       the restriction rules and inheritance structure defined by the W3C schema specification
       would be too slow.

FUNCTIONS

   Real functions
       builtin_type_info($type)
           Returns the configuration for $type, which is a HASH.  Be aware that the information
           in this HASH will change over time without too much notice.  Implement regression-
           tests in this if you use it!

   The Types
       The functions named in this section are all used at compile-time by the translator.  At
       that moment, they will be placed in the kind-of opcode tree which will process the data at
       run-time.  You cannot call these functions yourself.

       XML::Compile will automatically format the value for you.  For instance, a float supplied
       to a field defined as type Integer will be converted to an integer. Data supplied to a
       field of type base64Binary will be encoded as Base64 for you: you shouldn't do the
       conversion yourself, you'll get double encoding!

       Any

       anyAtomicType()
       anySimpleType()
       anyType()
           Both any*Type built-ins can contain any kind of data.  Perl decides how to represent
           the passed values.

       error()

       Ungrouped types

       boolean()
           Contains "true", "false", 1 (is true), or 0 (is false).  When the writer sees a value
           equal to 'true' or 'false', those are used.  Otherwise, the trueth value is evaluated
           into '0' or '1'.

           The reader will return '0' (also when the XML contains the string 'false', to simplify
           the Perl code) or '1'.

       pattern()

       Big Integers

       Schema's define integer types which are derived from the "decimal" type.  These values can
       grow enormously large, and therefore can only be handled correctly using Math::BigInt.
       When the translator is built with the "sloppy_integers" option, this will simplify (speed-
       up) the produced code considerably: all integers then shall be between -2G and +2G.

       integer()
           An integer with an undertermined (but possibly large) number of digits.

       long()
           A little bit shorter than an integer, but still up-to 19 digits.

       negativeInteger()
       nonNegativeInteger()
       nonPositiveInteger()
       positiveInteger()
       unsignedInt()
           Just too long to fit in Perl's ints.

       unsignedLong()
           Value up-to 20 digits.

       Integers

       byte()
           Signed 8-bits value.

       int()
       short()
           Signed 16-bits value.

       unsignedByte()
           Unsigned 8-bits value.

       unsignedShort()
           unsigned 16-bits value.

       Floating-point

       decimal()
           Decimals are painful: they can be very large, much larger than Perl's internal floats.
           Therefore, we need to use Math::BigFloat which are slow but nearly seamlessly
           invisible in the application.

       double()
           A floating-point value "m x 2**e", where m is an integer whose absolute value is less
           than 253, and e is an integer between −1074 and 971, inclusive.

           The implementation does not limited the double in size, but maps it onto an
           precisionDecimal (Math::BigFloat) unless "sloppy_float" is set.

       float()
           A small floating-point value "m x 2**e" where m is an integer whose absolute value is
           less than 224, and e is an integer between −149 and 104, inclusive.

           The implementation does not limited the float in size, but maps it onto an
           precisionDecimal (Math::BigFloat) unless "sloppy_float" is set.

       precisionDecimal()
           Floating point value that closely corresponds to the floating-point decimal datatypes
           described by IEEE/ANSI-754.

       Encoding

       base64Binary()
           In the hash, it will be kept as binary data.  In XML, it will be base64 encoded.

       hexBinary()
           In the hash, it will be kept as binary data.  In XML, it will be hex encoded, two hex
           digits per byte.

       Dates

       date()
           A day, represented in localtime as "YYYY-MM-DD" or "YYYY-MM-DD[-+]HH:mm".  When a
           decimal value is passed, it is interpreted as "time" value in UTC, and will be
           formatted as required.  When reading, the date string will not be parsed.

       dateTime()
           A moment, represented as "date T time tz?", where date is "YYYY-MM-DD", time is
           "HH:MM:SS", and the time-zone tz is either "-HH:mm", "+HH:mm", or "Z" for UTC.  The
           time-zone is optional, but can better be used because the default is not defined in
           the standard. For that reason, the "dateTimeStamp" got introduced, which requires the
           timezone.

           When a decimal value is passed, it is interpreted as "time" value in UTC, and will be
           formatted as required.  This will not work when the dateTime extended type has facet
           "explicitTimeZome="prohibited"".

           When reading, the date string will not be parsed.  Parsing timestamps is quite
           expensive, therefore not preformed automatically.   You may try Time::Local in
           combination with Date::Parse, or Time::Piece::ISO.  Be very careful with the timezone
           settings in your program, which effects "mktime" which is used by these
           implementations.  Best to run your application in GMT/UTC/UCT/Z.

       dateTimeStamp()
           Like "dateTime", but with required timezone which means that it is better defined. All
           other handling is the same.

       gDay()
           Format "---12" or "---12+09:00" (12 days, optional time-zone)

       gMonth()
           Format "--09" or "--09+07:00" (9 months, optional time-zone)

       gMonthDay()
           Format "--09-12" or "--09-12+07:00" (9 months 12 days, optional time-zone)

       gYear()
           Format 2006 or "2006+07:00" (year 2006, optional time-zone)

       gYearMonth()
           Format "2006-11" or "2006-11+07:00" (november 2006, optional time-zone)

       time()
           An moment in time, as can happen every day.

       Duration

       See XML::Compile::Util::duration2secs() to convert duration stamps into seconds.

       dayTimeDuration()
           Format "-PnDTnHnMnS", where optional starting "-" means negative.  The "P" is
           obligatory, and the "T" indicates start of a time part.  All other "n[DHMS]" are
           optional.

       duration()
           Format "-PnYnMnDTnHnMnS", where optional starting "-" means negative.  The "P" is
           obligatory, and the "T" indicates start of a time part.  All other "n[YMDHMS]" are
           optional.

       yearMonthDuration()
           Format "-PnYnMn", where optional starting "-" means negative.  The "P" is obligatory,
           the "n[YM]" are optional.

       Strings

       ID(, IDREF, IDREFS)
           A label, reference to a label, or set of references.

           PARTIAL IMPLEMENTATION: the validity of used characters is not checked.

       NCName(, ENTITY, ENTITIES)
           A name which contains no colons (a non-colonized name).

       Name()
       language()
           An RFC3066 language indicator.

       normalizedString()
           String where all sequence of white-spaces (including new-lines) are interpreted as one
           blank.  Blanks at beginning and the end of the string are ignored.

       string()
           (Usually utf8) string.

       token(, NMTOKEN, NMTOKENS)

       URI

       NOTATION()
           NOT IMPLEMENTED, so treated as string.

       QName()
           A qualified type name: a type name with optional prefix.  The prefix notation
           "prefix:type" will be translated into the "{$ns}type" notation.

           For writers, this translation can only happen when the $ns is also in use on some
           other place in the message: the name-space declaration can not be added at run-time.
           In other cases, you will get a run-time error.  Play with
           XML::Compile::Schema::compile(prefixes), predefining evenything what may be used,
           setting the "used" count to 1.

       anyURI()
           You may pass a string or, for instance, an URI object which will be stringified into
           an URI.  When read, the data will not automatically be translated into an URI object:
           it may not be used that way.

       only in 1999 and 2000/10 schemas

       binary()
           Perl strings can contain any byte, also nul-strings, so can contain any sequence of
           bits.  Limited to byte length.

       timeDuration()
           'Old' name for duration().

       uriReference()
           Probably the same rules as anyURI().

SEE ALSO

       This module is part of XML-Compile distribution version 1.61, built on November 09, 2018.
       Website: http://perl.overmeer.net/xml-compile/

LICENSE

       Copyrights 2006-2018 by [Mark Overmeer <markov@cpan.org>]. For other contributors see
       ChangeLog.

       This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the same
       terms as Perl itself.  See http://dev.perl.org/licenses/