Provided by: libbson-doc_1.15.0-1_all bug

NAME

       bson_parsing - Parsing and Iterating BSON Documents

PARSING

       BSON  documents  are lazily parsed as necessary. To begin parsing a BSON document, use one
       of the provided Libbson functions to create a  new  bson_t  from  existing  data  such  as
       bson_new_from_data().  This  will make a copy of the data so that additional mutations may
       occur to the BSON document.

       TIP:
          If you only want to parse a BSON document and have no need to mutate it,  you  may  use
          bson_init_static() to avoid making a copy of the data.

          bson_t *b;

          b = bson_new_from_data (my_data, my_data_len);
          if (!b) {
             fprintf (stderr, "The specified length embedded in <my_data> did not match "
                              "<my_data_len>\n");
             return;
          }

          bson_destroy (b);

       Only  two  checks are performed when creating a new bson_t from an existing buffer. First,
       the document must begin with the buffer length, matching what was expected by the  caller.
       Second, the document must end with the expected trailing \0 byte.

       To  parse  the  document  further  we use a bson_iter_t to iterate the elements within the
       document. Let's print all of the field names in the document.

          bson_t *b;
          bson_iter_t iter;

          if ((b = bson_new_from_data (my_data, my_data_len))) {
             if (bson_iter_init (&iter, b)) {
                while (bson_iter_next (&iter)) {
                   printf ("Found element key: \"%s\"\n", bson_iter_key (&iter));
                }
             }
             bson_destroy (b);
          }

       Converting a document to JSON uses a bson_iter_t and bson_visitor_t to iterate all  fields
       of a BSON document recursively and generate a UTF-8 encoded JSON string.

          bson_t *b;
          char *json;

          if ((b = bson_new_from_data (my_data, my_data_len))) {
             if ((json = bson_as_canonical_extended_json (b, NULL))) {
                printf ("%s\n", json);
                bson_free (json);
             }
             bson_destroy (b);
          }

RECURSING INTO SUB-DOCUMENTS

       Libbson  provides  convenient sub-iterators to dive down into a sub-document or sub-array.
       Below is an example that will dive into a sub-document named "foo" and  print  it's  field
       names.

          bson_iter_t iter;
          bson_iter_t child;
          char *json;

          if (bson_iter_init_find (&iter, doc, "foo") &&
              BSON_ITER_HOLDS_DOCUMENT (&iter) && bson_iter_recurse (&iter, &child)) {
             while (bson_iter_next (&child)) {
                printf ("Found sub-key of \"foo\" named \"%s\"\n",
                        bson_iter_key (&child));
             }
          }

FINDING FIELDS USING DOT NOTATION

       Using  the bson_iter_recurse() function exemplified above, bson_iter_find_descendant() can
       find a field for you using the MongoDB style path notation such as "foo.bar.0.baz".

       Let's create a document like {"foo": {"bar": [{"baz: 1}]}} and locate the "baz" field.

          bson_t *b;
          bson_iter_t iter;
          bson_iter_t baz;

          b =
             BCON_NEW ("foo", "{", "bar", "[", "{", "baz", BCON_INT32 (1), "}", "]", "}");

          if (bson_iter_init (&iter, b) &&
              bson_iter_find_descendant (&iter, "foo.bar.0.baz", &baz) &&
              BSON_ITER_HOLDS_INT32 (&baz)) {
             printf ("baz = %d\n", bson_iter_int32 (&baz));
          }

          bson_destroy (b);

VALIDATING A BSON DOCUMENT

       If all you  want  to  do  is  validate  that  a  BSON  document  is  valid,  you  can  use
       bson_validate().

          size_t err_offset;

          if (!bson_validate (doc, BSON_VALIDATE_NONE, &err_offset)) {
             fprintf (stderr,
                      "The document failed to validate at offset: %u\n",
                      (unsigned) err_offset);
          }

       See the bson_validate() documentation for more information and examples.

AUTHOR

       MongoDB, Inc

COPYRIGHT

       2017-present, MongoDB, Inc