Provided by: inform_6.30-2.1ubuntu1_i386 bug

NAME

       inform - interactive fiction compiler

SYNOPSIS

        inform   [-acefhijklmnopqrstuwxyzDMU]   [-g[2]]   [-vversion]    [-F1]
       [-Eerror-message-style]

DESCRIPTION

       Inform is a compiler for interactive fiction.

       It takes input in a vaguely C-like syntax (described in info inform  ),
       and outputs in a form compatible with infocom z-machine players.

   OPTIONS
       -a     Trace  assembly-language (without hex dumps; see -t); this is to
              help with maintaining inform, of for debugging assembly language
              programs.

       -c     More  concise  error  messages: in c mode, Inform does not quote
              whole source lines together with error messages.

       -d     Contract double spaces after full stops in text.  Converts  text
              like

              "...with a mango.  You applaud..."

              into  the  same  with  only  a single space after the full stop,
              which will prevent an interpreter  from  displaying  a  spurious
              space  at  the  beginning of a line when a line break happens to
              occur exactly after the full stop; this is to help  typists  who
              habitually double-space.

       -d2    Contract  double  spaces  after  exclamation and question marks,
              too.

       -e     Economy mode  (slower).  Only  in  ’Economy’  mode  does  Inform
              actually  process  abbreviations,  because this is seldom needed
              and slows the compiler by 10% or so; the game  file  should  not
              play  any differently if compiled this way, but will probably be
              shorter, if your choice of abbreviations was sensible.

       -f     Frequencies mode; show how useful abbreviations are, showing how
              many bytes they saved.

       -g     Makes  Inform automatically compile trace-printing code on every
              function call; in play this will produce reams of text  (several
              pages  between  each  chance  to type commands) but is sometimes
              useful. Note that this can be set on an  individual  command  by
              writing  *  as  its  first  local variable, without use of the g
              switch.

       -g2    Trace function calls within the library too.

       -h     Print a usage message on standard output and exit.

       -i     Ignores switches set within the source file. It is  possible  to
              set  any switches using a "Switches" command in the source; this
              option will ignore them.

       -j     List objects as constructed. Makes Inform print out steady  text
              to  prove  that it’s still awake: on very slow machines this may
              be a convenience!

       -k     Writes a "debugging information" file for the use of  the  Infix
              debugger.

       -l     List every statement run through inform.

       -m     Say how much memory has been allocated.

       -n     Print numbers of properties, attributes and actions.

       -o     Print offset addresses.

       -p     Give percentage breakdown of story file.

       -q     Keep  quiet  about  obsolete  usages.  This  may  be useful when
              compiling very long, very old programs.

       -r     Record all the text to "gametext". This is intended to help with
              proof-reading the text of a game: it transcribes all of the text
              in double-quotes.

       -s     Give statistics. This is particularly useful to  keep  track  of
              how large the game is growing.

       -t     Trace  assembly-language  (with full hex dumps; see -a); this is
              to help with  maintaining  inform,  of  for  debugging  assembly
              language programs.

       -u     Work out most useful abbreviations: tries to work out a good set
              of abbreviations  to  declare  for  your  game,  but  ‘extremely
              slowly’  (a  matter  of  hours) and ‘consuming very much memory’
              (perhaps a megabyte).

       -v     Chooses the format of the game to be compiled.  v5  ("advanced")
              is the default, but if a game begins to overflow this, try v8. A
              few very old interpreters require the  limited  v3  ("standard")
              format.

       -w     Suppresses warning messages.

       -x     Print  a  # for every 100 lines compiled. Makes Inform print out
              steady text to  prove  that  it’s  still  awake:  on  very  slow
              machines this may be a convenience!

       -y     Trace linking system, to help with maintaining Inform.

       -z     Print memory map of the z-machine.

       -D     Insert  ‘Constant  DEBUG;’ automatically. This makes the library
              add the debugging suite to a game. This is just  a  convenience:
              it’s a nuisance to keep adding and removing source code lines to
              do the same thing.

       -E     This selects an eroor  message  format,  since  different  error
              formats   fit  in  better  with  debugging  tools  on  different
              machines.  -E0,  the  default,  is  Archimedes-style,   -E1   is
              Microsoft style, -E2 is Macintosh MPW style.

       -F1    Use temporary files to reduce memory consumption.

       -M     Compile  as  a module for further linking. See the info for more
              information.

       -U     Insert ‘Constant  USE_MODULES’  automatically;  this  speeds  up
              compilation by linking in the library instead of recompiling it.

SEE ALSO

       There is extensive documentation available in /usr/share/doc/inform and
       in  the info system. You might like to install the inform-docs package,
       which includes additional documentation.

AUTHOR

       This manpage was  put  together  by  Mark  Baker,  based  on  the  info
       documentation.

                                                                     INFORM(1)