Provided by: task_1.9.2-1_i386 bug

NAME

       task-tutorial - A tutorial for the task(1) command line todo manager.

NOTE

       Please note that this tutorial was written for task 1.7.0. Though it is
       still accurate on the general usage of task, it  might  not  longer  be
       100%  correct  in  all  details. A new tutorial for task is planned for
       task 2.0.0.

DESCRIPTION

       Task is a command line TODO list manager. It maintains a list of  tasks
       that  you  want  to  do,  allowing  you  to  add/remove,  and otherwise
       manipulate them.  Task has a rich list of commands that allow you to do
       various things with it.

30 second tutorial

       For the excessively lazy. Add two tasks:
              $ task add Read task documents later
              $ task add priority:H Pay bills

       Easy.  See that second one has a High priority? Now let's look at those
       tasks:
              $ task ls
              ID Project Pri Description
               2         H   Pay bills
               1             Read task documents later

       They are ordered by priority. Let's mark number 2 as done:
              $ task 2 done
              $ task ls
              ID Project Pri Description
               1             Read task documents later

       Gone. Now let's delete that remaining task, because, well,  why  bother
       now we are already using task:
              $ task delete 1
              $ task ls
              No matches

       That's  how  easy  managing  your  task  list can be.  But now consider
       learning what task can really do...

Simple usage of task

       Let us begin by adding some tasks:
              $ task add Book plane ticket
              $ task add Rent a tux
              $ task add Reserve a rental car
              $ task add Reserve a hotel room

       You'll notice immediately that task has a  very  minimalist  interface.
       Let us take a look at those tasks:
              $ task ls
              ID Project Pri Description
               1             Book plane ticket
               2             Rent a tux
               3             Reserve a rental car
               4             Send John a birthday card

       The 'ls' command provides the most minimal list of tasks. Each task has
       been given an id number, and you can see that there are no projects  or
       priorities  assigned. Wait a minute - I own a tux, I don't need to rent
       one. Let us delete task 2:
              $ task 2 delete
              Permanently delete task? (y/n) y

       Task wants you to confirm deletions. To suppress the confirmation, edit
       your .taskrc file and change the line:
              confirmation=yes
       to have a value of "no".  If the entry is not there, then add it.

       While the use of projects and priorities are not essential, they can be
       very useful when the list of tasks grows large.  Let's assign  projects
       to these tasks:
              $ task 1 project:Wedding
              $ task 3 project:Wedding
              $ task 4 project:Family
              $ task ls
              ID Project Pri Description
               3 Family      Send John a birthday card
               2 Wedding     Reserve a rental car
               1 Wedding     Book plane ticket

       Notice  that  the  id  numbers have changed. When tasks get deleted, or
       have their attributes changed (project, for example), the ids are prone
       to  change.   But  the id numbers will remain valid until the next 'ls'
       command is run.  You should only use the ids from the most recent  'ls'
       command.  The  ids  change,  because task is always trying to use small
       numbers so that it is easy for you to enter them  correctly.  Now  that
       projects are assigned, we can look at just the Wedding project tasks:

       Subprojects  are  supported.  If  you have a project "Wedding", you can
       specify that a  task  is  a  subproject  "Transport"  of  "Wedding"  by
       assigning the project "Wedding.Transport". Let's do this:
              $ task 2 project:Wedding.Transport
              $ task ls
              ID Project           Pri Description
               3 Family                Send John a birthday card
               2 Wedding.Transport     Reserve a rental car
               1 Wedding               Book plane ticket

       Task  matches  the  leftmost  part  of  the  project when searching, so
       projects may be abbreviated:
              $ task ls project:Wedding.Tra
              ID Project           Pri Description
               2 Wedding.Transport     Reserve a rental car

       This way of matching projects can be used to see all  tasks  under  the
       "Wedding" project and all subprojects:
              $ task ls project:Wedding
              ID Project           Pri Description
               2 Wedding.Transport     Reserve a rental car
               1 Wedding               Book plane ticket

       Let's reassign 2 back to the "Wedding" project:
              $ task 2 project:Wedding

       Now that projects are assigned, we can look at just the Wedding project
       tasks:
              $ task ls project:Wedding
              ID Project Pri Description
               1 Wedding     Book plane ticket
               2 Wedding     Reserve a rental car

       Any command arguments after the 'ls' are used for filtering the output.
       We could also have requested:
              $ task ls ticket plane
              ID Project Pri Description
               1 Wedding     Book plane ticket

       Now  let's prioritize. Priorities can be H, M or L (High, Medium, Low).
              $ task ls
              ID Project Pri Description
               3 Family      Send John a birthday card
               2 Wedding     Reserve a rental car
               1 Wedding     Book plane ticket
              $ task 1 priority:H
              $ task 2 prior:M
              $ task 3 pr:H
              Ambiguous attribute 'pr' - could be either of project, priority
              $ task 3 pri:H
              $ task ls
              ID Project Pri Description
               3 Family  H   Send John a birthday card
               1 Wedding H   Book plane ticket
               2 Wedding M   Reserve a rental car

       Notice that task supports the abbreviation of words  such  as  priority
       and project. Priority can be abbreviated to pri, but not pr, because it
       is ambiguous. Now that tasks have been prioritized, you  can  see  that
       the tasks are being sorted by priority, with the highest priority tasks
       at the top.

       These attributes can all be provided when the task is added, instead of
       applying  them afterwards, as shown. The following command shows how to
       set all the attributes at once:
              $ task add project:Wedding priority:H Book plane ticket

       The sequence of those arguments is not important,  so  you  could  have
       entered the following command instead:
              $ task project:Wedding add Book plane priority:H ticket

       This  is  because  task  knows  what attributes look like (name:value),
       knows what commands it supports (add, ...), and just assumes  the  rest
       is  part  of the description.  Incidentally, if you wanted 'priority:H'
       to be part of your  task  description,  you  need  to  fool  task  into
       ignoring it as an attribute.  That can be done in two ways:
              $  task  add "quoting makes task consider priority:H part of one
              big argument"  $  task  add  --  the  hyphens  make  task  treat
              everything after it as description

       The  'ls'  command  provides  the  least information for each task. The
       'list' command provides more:
              $ task list
              ID Project Pri Due Active Age    Description
               3 Family  H              4 mins Send John a birthday card
               1 Wedding H              5 mins Book plane ticket
               2 Wedding M              5 mins Reserve a rental car

       Notice that a task can have a due date, and can  be  active.  The  task
       lists are sorted by due date, then priority. Let's add due dates:
              $ task 3 due:6/25/2008
              $ task 1 due:7/31/2008
              $ task list
              ID Project Pri Due       Active Age    Description
               3 Family  H   6/25/2008        6 mins Send John a birthday card
               1 Wedding H   7/31/2008        7 mins Book plane ticket
               2 Wedding M                    7 mins Reserve a rental car

       Note that due tasks may be colored to highlight  the  importance.   See
       the task-color(5) man page for full details.

       Tagging  tasks  is  a  good  way to group them, aside from specifying a
       project.  To add a tag to a task:
              $ task <id> +tag

       The plus sign indicates that this is a tag. Any number of tags  may  be
       applied  to  a  task, and then used for searching. Tags are just single
       words that are labels.
              $ task list
              ID Project Pri Due       Active Age    Description
               3 Family  H   6/25/2008        8 mins Send John a birthday card
               1 Wedding H   7/31/2008        9 mins Book plane ticket
               2 Wedding M                    9 mins Reserve a rental car
              $ task 1 +phone
              $ task 2 +phone
              $ task 3 +shopping
              $ task 3 +john
              $ task list +phone
              ID Project Pri Due       Active Age    Description
               1 Wedding H   7/31/2008        9 mins Book plane ticket
               2 Wedding M                    9 mins Reserve a rental car

       To remove a tag from a task, use the minus sign:
              $ task 3 -john

       To add a task that you have already completed, use the log command:
              $ task log Notify postal service

       This  is  equivalent  to first adding a new task, then marking that new
       task as done.  It is simple a shortcut.

Advanced usage of task

       Advanced examples of the usage of task can be  found  at  the  official
       site at <http://taskwarrior.org>

CREDITS & COPYRIGHTS

       task was written by P. Beckingham <paul@beckingham.net>.
       Copyright (C) 2006 - 2010 P. Beckingham

       This man page was originally written by Federico Hernandez.

       task   is  distributed  under  the  GNU  General  Public  License.  See
       http://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl-2.0.txt for more information.

SEE ALSO

       task(1), taskrc(5), task-faq(5) task-color(5)

       For more information regarding task, the following may be referenced:

       The official site at
              <http://taskwarrior.org>

       The official code repository at
              <git://tasktools.org/task.git/>

       You can contact the project by writing an email to
              <support@taskwarrior.org>

REPORTING BUGS

       Bugs in task may be reported to the issue-tracker at
              <http://taskwarrior.org>