Provided by: syslog-ng_3.2.4-1ubuntu1_i386 bug

NAME

       syslog-ng.conf - syslog-ng configuration file

SYNOPSIS

       syslog-ng.conf

DESCRIPTION

       This manual page is only an abstract; for the complete documentation of
       syslog-ng, see The syslog-ng Administrator Guide[2].

       The syslog-ng application is a flexible and highly scalable system
       logging application. Typically, syslog-ng is used to manage log
       messages and implement centralized logging, where the aim is to collect
       the log messages of several devices on a single, central log server.
       The different devices - called syslog-ng clients - all run syslog-ng,
       and collect the log messages from the various applications, files, and
       other sources. The clients send all important log messages to the
       remote syslog-ng server, where the server sorts and stores them.

       The syslog-ng application reads incoming messages and forwards them to
       the selected destinations. The syslog-ng application can receive
       messages from files, remote hosts, and other sources.

       Log messages enter syslog-ng in one of the defined sources, and are
       sent to one or more destinations.

       Sources and destinations are independent objects; log paths define what
       syslog-ng does with a message, connecting the sources to the
       destinations. A log path consists of one or more sources and one or
       more destinations; messages arriving to a source are sent to every
       destination listed in the log path. A log path defined in syslog-ng is
       called a log statement.

       Optionally, log paths can include filters. Filters are rules that
       select only certain messages, for example, selecting only messages sent
       by a specific application. If a log path includes filters, syslog-ng
       sends only the messages satisfying the filter rules to the destinations
       set in the log path.

CONFIGURING SYSLOG-NG

       Global objects (for example sources, destinations, log paths, or
       filters) are defined in the syslog-ng configuration file. Object
       definitions consist of the following elements:

       ·   Type of the object: One of source, destination, log, filter,
           parser, rewrite rule, or template.

       ·   Identifier of the object: A unique name identifying the object.
           When using a reserved word as an identifier, enclose the identifier
           in quotation marks.

               Tip
               Use identifiers that refer to the type of the object they
               identify. For example, prefix source objects with s_,
               destinations with d_, and so on.

       ·   Parameters: The parameters of the object, enclosed in braces
           {parameters}.

       ·   Semicolon: Object definitions end with a semicolon (;).

       The syntax is summarized as follows:

       The syntax of log statements is as follows:

           log {
               source(s1); source(s2); ...
               optional_element(filter1|parser1|rewrite1); optional_element(filter2|parser2|rewrite2);...
               destination(d1); destination(d2); ...
               flags(flag1[, flag2...]);
               };

       The following log statement sends all messages arriving to the
       localhost to a remote server.

           source s_localhost { tcp(ip(127.0.0.1) port(1999) ); };
           destination d_tcp { tcp("10.1.2.3" port(1999); localport(999)); };
           log { source(s_localhost); destination(d_tcp); };

       The syslog-ng application has a number of global options governing DNS
       usage, the timestamp format used, and other general points. Each option
       may have parameters, similarly to driver specifications. To set global
       options, add an option statement to the syslog-ng configuration file
       using the following syntax:

           options { option1(params); option2(params); ... };

       The sources, destinations, and filters available in syslog-ng are
       listed below. For details, see The syslog-ng Administrator Guide[2].

       Table 1. Source drivers available in syslog-ng
       ┌──────────────┬────────────────────────────┐
       │NameDescription                │
       ├──────────────┼────────────────────────────┤
       │internal()    │ Messages generated         │
       │              │ internally in syslog-ng.   │
       ├──────────────┼────────────────────────────┤
       │file()        │ Opens the specified file   │
       │              │ and reads messages.        │
       ├──────────────┼────────────────────────────┤
       │pipe(), fifo  │ Opens the specified named  │
       │              │ pipe and reads messages.   │
       ├──────────────┼────────────────────────────┤
       │program()     │ Opens the specified        │
       │              │ application and reads      │
       │              │ messages from its standard │
       │              │ output.                    │
       ├──────────────┼────────────────────────────┤
       │sun-stream(), │ Opens the specified        │
       │sun-streams() │ STREAMS device on Solaris  │
       │              │ systems and reads incoming │
       │              │ messages.                  │
       ├──────────────┼────────────────────────────┤
       │syslog()      │ Listens for incoming       │
       │              │ messages using the new     │
       │              │ IETF-standard syslog       │
       │              │ protocol.                  │
       ├──────────────┼────────────────────────────┤
       │tcp(), tcp6() │ Listens on the specified   │
       │              │ TCP port for incoming      │
       │              │ messages using the         │
       │              │ BSD-syslog protocol over   │
       │              │ IPv4 and IPv6 networks,    │
       │              │ respectively.              │
       ├──────────────┼────────────────────────────┤
       │udp(), udp6() │ Listens on the specified   │
       │              │ UDP port for incoming      │
       │              │ messages using the         │
       │              │ BSD-syslog protocol over   │
       │              │ IPv4 and IPv6 networks,    │
       │              │ respectively.              │
       ├──────────────┼────────────────────────────┤
       │unix-dgram()  │ Opens the specified unix   │
       │              │ socket in SOCK_DGRAM mode  │
       │              │ and listens for incoming   │
       │              │ messages.                  │
       ├──────────────┼────────────────────────────┤
       │unix-stream() │ Opens the specified unix   │
       │              │ socket in SOCK_STREAM mode │
       │              │ and listens for incoming   │
       │              │ messages.                  │
       └──────────────┴────────────────────────────┘

       Table 2. Destination drivers available in syslog-ng
       ┌─────────────────┬────────────────────────────┐
       │NameDescription                │
       ├─────────────────┼────────────────────────────┤
       │file()           │ Writes messages to the     │
       │                 │ specified file.            │
       ├─────────────────┼────────────────────────────┤
       │fifo(), pipe()   │ Writes messages to the     │
       │                 │ specified named pipe.      │
       ├─────────────────┼────────────────────────────┤
       │program()        │ Forks and launches the     │
       │                 │ specified program, and     │
       │                 │ sends messages to its      │
       │                 │ standard input.            │
       ├─────────────────┼────────────────────────────┤
       │sql()            │ Sends messages into an SQL │
       │                 │ database. In addition to   │
       │                 │ the standard syslog-ng     │
       │                 │ packages, the sql()        │
       │                 │ destination requires       │
       │                 │ database-specific packages │
       │                 │ to be installed. Refer to  │
       │                 │ the section appropriate    │
       │                 │ for your platform in ???.  │
       ├─────────────────┼────────────────────────────┤
       │syslog()         │ Sends messages to the      │
       │                 │ specified remote host      │
       │                 │ using the IETF-syslog      │
       │                 │ protocol. The IETF         │
       │                 │ standard supports message  │
       │                 │ transport using the UDP,   │
       │                 │ TCP, and TLS networking    │
       │                 │ protocols.                 │
       ├─────────────────┼────────────────────────────┤
       │tcp() and tcp6() │ Sends messages to the      │
       │                 │ specified TCP port of a    │
       │                 │ remote host using the      │
       │                 │ BSD-syslog protocol over   │
       │                 │ IPv4 and IPv6,             │
       │                 │ respectively.              │
       ├─────────────────┼────────────────────────────┤
       │udp() and udp6() │ Sends messages to the      │
       │                 │ specified UDP port of a    │
       │                 │ remote host using the      │
       │                 │ BSD-syslog protocol over   │
       │                 │ IPv4 and IPv6,             │
       │                 │ respectively.              │
       ├─────────────────┼────────────────────────────┤
       │unix-dgram()     │ Sends messages to the      │
       │                 │ specified unix socket in   │
       │                 │ SOCK_DGRAM style (BSD).    │
       ├─────────────────┼────────────────────────────┤
       │unix-stream()    │ Sends messages to the      │
       │                 │ specified unix socket in   │
       │                 │ SOCK_STREAM style (Linux). │
       ├─────────────────┼────────────────────────────┤
       │usertty()        │ Sends messages to the      │
       │                 │ terminal of the specified  │
       │                 │ user, if the user is       │
       │                 │ logged in.                 │
       └─────────────────┴────────────────────────────┘

FILES

       /etc/syslog-ng/syslog-ng.conf

SEE ALSO

       syslog-ng(8)

       The syslog-ng Administrator Guide[2]

       If you experience any problems or need help with syslog-ng, visit the
       syslog-ng mailing list[3]

       For news and notifications about the documentation of syslog-ng, visit
       the BalaBit Documentation Blog[4].

AUTHOR

       This manual page was written by the BalaBit Documentation Team
       <documentation@balabit.com>.

COPYRIGHT

       Copyright © 2000-2009 BalaBit IT Security Ltd. Published under the
       Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works
       (by-nc-nd) 3.0 license. See http://creativecommons.org/ for details.
       The latest version is always available at
       http://www.balabit.com/support/documentation.

NOTES

        1. official syslog-ng website
           http://www.balabit.com/network-security/syslog-ng/

        2. The syslog-ng Administrator Guide
           http://www.balabit.com/support/documentation/

        3. syslog-ng mailing list
           https://lists.balabit.hu/mailman/listinfo/syslog-ng

        4. BalaBit Documentation Blog
           http://robert.blogs.balabit.com