Provided by: wulflogger_2.6.0-0ubuntu1_amd64 bug

NAME

       wulflogger - A logging utility/client for xmlsysd

SYNOPSIS

       wulflogger [-h] [-v] [-t display_type] [-d delay] [-c count]
                    [-f /path/to/wulfhosts] [-l]

WULFLOGGER OPTIONS

        -h shows help (command synopsis).
        -v makes execution verbose for debugging or the bored.
        -t display_type selects display type from list below
        -d delay (in seconds) selects update loop delay
        -c count causes it to output count pages (only) and exit
        -f /path/to/wulfhosts to use a particular wulfhosts file
        -l show localhost only (use no wulfhosts file from any location)

DESCRIPTION

       wulflogger  is  a  simple  yet  powerful  tty  based cluster monitoring tool.  It requires
       xmlsysd (running on each system to be monitored) to efficiently provide it with system and
       proc-derived  information  that  is  processed  and provided to the user in one of several
       user-selectable display formats.  With it a user  can  monitor  things  across  en  entire
       beowulf,  cluster,  or  workstation  LAN  systems descriptors such as load average, memory
       consumption, swap, page, and interrupt activity and network loads or can even retrieve and
       display  such mundane information is CPU make and base clock, system time, uptime or other
       potentially useful but slowly varying system descriptors.  The  information  presented  is
       updated  regularly  after  a  user-selectable  delay.  This tool prints cluster results to
       stdout, from which they can be redirected into a log  file  or  piped  into  a  tool  (for
       example, a graphing utility or web application).

WULFHOST

       To  run  wulflogger  as  anything  but a monitor of the local host one REQUIRES a wulfhost
       file.  wulflogger run with no viable wulfhost file defaults to a localhost connection.   A
       localhost  connection  can also be forced (overriding the search for a wulfhost file) with
       the -l command line argument.

       The wulfhost file tells wulflogger where to to connect to xmlsysd's.  It consists  of  any
       mix of the following xml discriptors:

       <?xml version="1.0"?>

       <wulfstat>

         <root/>
         <user>rgb</user>
         <task>On_spin3d</task>

         <host>
           <name>ganesh</name>
         </host>

         <host>
            <ip>192.168.1.132</ip>
           <port>7887</port>
         <host>

         <host>
           <name>lucifer</name>
           <ip>192.168.1.131</ip>
           <port>7887</port>
         </host>

         <hostrange>
           <hostfmt>g%02d</hostfmt>
           <imin>1</imin>
           <imax>15</imax>
           <port>7887</port>
         </hostrange>

         <iprange>
           <ipmin>152.3.182.193</ipmin>
           <ipmax>152.3.182.200</ipmax>
           <port>7887</port>
         </iprange>

       </wulfstat>

       From  this  example,  one  sees  that  the <host></host> tag defines a host to connect to.
       Within this tag, the host can be specified by the <name></name> tag (which can contain any
       name  resolvable by gethostbyname()) or the <ip></ip> tag, most commonly used for hosts in
       a cluster that haven't been  named.   In  addition,  for  each  host  one  can  specify  a
       <port></port>  if  one  for any reason is running the xmlsysd on a different port than its
       installation default.

       This information can easily be overspecified.  In most cases, for example, it is better to
       just  use  the  default  port (7887) and let local hostname ip address lookup take care of
       determining the interface IP number. Note that xml doesn't care how the tags are laid  out
       as  long  as  they  are  nested  correctly,  and  that  there can be more than one <host>,
       <hostrange>, or <iprange> tagset in a wulfhosts to specify the simultaneous monitoring  of
       any mix of hosts, clusters, lans.

       Note also that xml DOES preserve whitespace, so

         <host><name>b0 </name></host>

       is NOT the same is

         <host><name>b0</name></host>

       and  would  likely  not work correctly.  If you do enter port, name, and ip explicitly and
       incorrectly or inconsistently, be prepared for odd behavior.

       The <hostrange> is hopefully self explanatory.  It can be used to rapidly define an entire
       cluster  on the basis of a systematic ordering of hostname.  The contents of the <hostfmt>
       tag should be a SIMPLE printf-format string for a presumed integer that will  be  iterated
       from  <imin> to <imax> in steps of one.  In this way a single xml tag can define an entire
       cluster e.g. g01-g15.

       The <iprange> is similar, except that it uses ip number directly in <ipmin>  and  <ipmax>.
       Use  caution  -- in almost all cases the first three tuples in the ip number should be the
       SAME in <ipmin> and <ipmax>. This option is provided in case the hosts don't have a  well-
       defined  and published hostname and are accessible only by e.g. dhcp-assigned ip number in
       any event.

       All forms of defining a host or list of hosts permit an optional <port> to be assigned  to
       override xmlsysd's installation default of 7887.

       wulflogger  will  connect  to these hosts as fast as it can in a parallel thread, and then
       will periodically attempt to REconnect to any hosts that might be down or  that  might  go
       down  while  wulflogger  is  running.  wulflogger itself is thus moderately robust against
       cluster node state changes.

       Note that any hosts that do not resolve are displayed but marked unknown.  Any hosts  that
       resolve  but that cannot accept a connection (which could mean that no daemon is installed
       or  running,  the  daemon  has  more  connections  than  the  number  permitted  in   e.g.
       /etc/xinetd.d/xmlsysd, or that the host is down) are marked down.

DISPLAY TYPES

       The following display types are supported by wulflogger:

         0 - load and status only (default), a very useful display for cluster
             users
         1 - stat -- information and rates primary derived from /proc/stat
         2 - memory only (similar to running "free" on each host)
         3 - network rates
         4 - time displays system clocks, uptime, cpu type and clock
         5 - pids interface for monitoring running distributed tasks.
         6 - pids interface for monitoring running distributed tasks with
             full command line displayed.

       The  pids  interface  is  a  bit  quirky.  It  will generally ignore root-owned tasks, for
       example, presuming that the tool is intended to  monitor  userspace  applications.   There
       exist wulfhosts controls for these properties; eventually they will likely be controllable
       at the command line as well.

CRON USAGE

       wulflogger can be used in a cron script in a variety of  ways.   The  -c  count  flag  was
       introduced  to  facilitate  this  usage.   For  example, one could put wulflogger into the
       following sort of pipe:

        #!/bin/sh

        DOWN=`/usr/bin/wulflogger -f /etc/wulfhosts.cluster1 -t 1 -c 1 \
           | grep down | cut -f 1 -d ´ ´`
        # now do something about the down hosts...

DEBUGGING

       To help debug wulflogger (or problems you might have with wulfhosts), note  the  table  of
       verbose/debugging  values  that  is  printed  as part of its Usage (-h flag).  This yields
       anything from a simple  trace  of  a  particular  subsystem  such  as  connect_hosts()  to
       everything  the  program does.  To limit the output, one can also use the -c count flag to
       only display a single cycle.  It is a good idea to pipe stderr into a  logfile  separately
       so that the display output is unaltered.  The logfile can be examined later or mailed back
       to me for analysis.

       An example of this might be:

         wulflogger -l -c 1 -v 10 2>connect_hosts.log

       to trace what wulflogger does connecting to localhost.

SEE ALSO

       libwulf(3), wulfstat(1)

PUBLICATION RULES

       wulflogger can be modified and used at will by any user, provided that:

         a) The original copyright notices are maintained and  that  the  source,  including  all
       modifications,  is made publically available at the time of any derived publication.  This
       is open source software according to the precepts and spirit of the  Gnu  Public  License.
       See the accompanying file COPYING, which also must accompany any redistribution.

         b) The author of the code (Robert G. Brown) is appropriately acknowledged and referenced
       in any derived use or publication.

         c) Full responsibility for the accuracy, suitability, and effectiveness of  the  program
       rests  with  the  users  and/or  modifiers.   As  is  clearly  stated  in the accompanying
       copyright.h:

       THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS DISCLAIM ALL WARRANTIES WITH REGARD TO THIS SOFTWARE, INCLUDING  ALL
       IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS, IN NO EVENT SHALL THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS
       BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES  OR  ANY  DAMAGES  WHATSOEVER
       RESULTING  FROM LOSS OF USE, DATA OR PROFITS, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE
       OR OTHER TORTIOUS ACTION, ARISING OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE USE OR  PERFORMANCE  OF
       THIS SOFTWARE.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

       None  to  speak  of  now, but a good place to comply with b) above later, if you hack this
       code.  Well, I  should  probably  acknowledge  the  essential  help  of  Icon  (Konstantin
       Raibetsev)  and  Seth  Vidal,  the  entire beowulf list, and various books on xml, network
       programming (e.g. Stevens) and a cast of thousands.  So let's assume that I just did;-)

       GPL 2b; see the file COPYING that accompanies the source of this  program.   This  is  the
       "standard  Gnu  General Public License version 2 or any later version", with the one minor
       (humorous) "Beverage" modification listed below.  Note that this modification is  probably
       not legally defensible and can be followed really pretty much according to the honor rule.

       As  to  my  personal  preferences in beverages, red wine is great, beer is delightful, and
       Coca Cola or coffee or tea or even milk acceptable to those who for religious or  personal
       reasons wish to avoid stressing my liver.

       The Beverage Modification to the GPL:

       Any  satisfied  user  of  this  software shall, upon meeting the primary author(s) of this
       software for the first time under the appropriate circumstances, offer to buy him  or  her
       or  them a beverage.  This beverage may or may not be alcoholic, depending on the personal
       ethical and moral views of the offerer.  The beverage cost need not exceed one U.S. dollar
       (although  it  certainly may at the whim of the offerer:-) and may be accepted or declined
       with no further obligation on the part of the offerer.  It is not necessary to repeat  the
       offer after the first meeting, but it can't hurt...