Provided by: librose-db-perl_0.763-1_all bug

NAME

       Rose::DB::Oracle - Oracle driver class for Rose::DB.

SYNOPSIS

         use Rose::DB;

         Rose::DB->register_db
         (
           domain   => 'development',
           type     => 'main',
           driver   => 'Oracle',
           database => 'dev_db',
           host     => 'localhost',
           username => 'devuser',
           password => 'mysecret',
         );

         Rose::DB->default_domain('development');
         Rose::DB->default_type('main');
         ...

         $db = Rose::DB->new; # $db is really a Rose::DB::Oracle-derived object
         ...

DESCRIPTION

       Rose::DB blesses objects into a class derived from Rose::DB::Oracle when the driver is
       "oracle".  This mapping of driver names to class names is configurable.  See the
       documentation for Rose::DB's new() and driver_class() methods for more information.

       This class cannot be used directly.  You must use Rose::DB and let its new() method return
       an object blessed into the appropriate class for you, according to its driver_class()
       mappings.

       Only the methods that are new or have different behaviors than those in Rose::DB are
       documented here.  See the Rose::DB documentation for the full list of methods.

       Oracle 9 or later is required.

       Note: This class is a work in progress.  Support for Oracle databases is not yet complete.
       If you would like to help, please contact John Siracusa at siracusa@gmail.com or post to
       the mailing list.

CLASS METHODS

       default_post_connect_sql [STATEMENTS]
           Get or set the default list of SQL statements that will be run immediately after
           connecting to the database.  STATEMENTS should be a list or reference to an array of
           SQL statements.  Returns a reference to the array of SQL statements in scalar context,
           or a list of SQL statements in list context.

           The default_post_connect_sql statements will be run before any statements set using
           the post_connect_sql method.  The default list contains the following:

               ALTER SESSION SET NLS_DATE_FORMAT = 'YYYY-MM-DD HH24:MI:SS'
               ALTER SESSION SET NLS_TIMESTAMP_FORMAT = 'YYYY-MM-DD HH24:MI:SS.FF'
               ALTER SESSION SET NLS_TIMESTAMP_TZ_FORMAT = 'YYYY-MM-DD HH24:MI:SS.FF TZHTZM'

           These statements enable date/time column value parsing and formatting to work
           correctly.

OBJECT METHODS

       post_connect_sql [STATEMENTS]
           Get or set the SQL statements that will be run immediately after connecting to the
           database.  STATEMENTS should be a list or reference to an array of SQL statements.
           Returns a reference to an array (in scalar) or a list of the default_post_connect_sql
           statements and the post_connect_sql statements.  Example:

               $db->post_connect_sql('UPDATE mytable SET num = num + 1');

               print join("\n", $db->post_connect_sql);

               ALTER SESSION SET NLS_DATE_FORMAT='YYYY-MM-DD HH24:MI:SS'
               ALTER SESSION SET NLS_TIMESTAMP_FORMAT='YYYY-MM-DD HH24:MI:SSxFF'
               UPDATE mytable SET num = num + 1

       schema [SCHEMA]
           Get or set the database schema name.  In Oracle, every user has a corresponding
           schema.  The schema is comprised of all objects that user owns, and has the same name
           as that user.  Therefore, this attribute defaults to the username if it is not set
           explicitly.

   Value Parsing and Formatting
       validate_date_keyword STRING
           Returns true if STRING is a valid keyword for the PostgreSQL "date" data type.  Valid
           (case-insensitive) date keywords are:

               current_date
               current_timestamp
               localtimestamp
               months_between
               sysdate
               systimestamp

           The keywords are case sensitive.  Any string that looks like a function call (matches
           "/^\w+\(.*\)$/") is also considered a valid date keyword if keyword_function_calls is
           true.

       validate_timestamp_keyword STRING
           Returns true if STRING is a valid keyword for the Oracle "timestamp" data type, false
           otherwise.  Valid timestamp keywords are:

               current_date
               current_timestamp
               localtimestamp
               months_between
               sysdate
               systimestamp

           The keywords are case sensitive.  Any string that looks like a function call (matches
           "/^\w+\(.*\)$/") is also considered a valid timestamp keyword if
           keyword_function_calls is true.

AUTHORS

       John C. Siracusa (siracusa@gmail.com), Ron Savage (ron@savage.net.au)

LICENSE

       Copyright (c) 2008 by John Siracusa and Ron Savage.  All rights reserved. This program is
       free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the same terms as Perl
       itself.