Provided by: orpie_1.5.1-9_i386 bug

NAME

       orpierc   is  the  configuration  textfile  for  the  orpie(1)  console
       calculator.

INTRODUCTION

       CAUTION: while this manpage should be suitable as a quick reference, it
       may  be  subject  to  miscellaneous  shortcomings  in  typesetting. The
       definitive documentation is the user manual provided with Orpie in  PDF
       format.

       Orpie  reads  a  run-configuration  textfile (generally /etc/orpierc or
       /usr/local/etc/orpierc) to determine key and command bindings. You  can
       create  a personalized configuration file in $HOME/.orpierc, and select
       bindings that match your usage patterns. The recommended  procedure  is
       to  ``include''  the  orpierc  file  provided with Orpie (see INCLUDING
       OTHER RCFILES), and add or remove settings as desired.

ORPIERC SYNTAX

       You may notice that the orpierc syntax is similar to the syntax used in
       the configuration file for the Mutt email client (muttrc).

       Within  the  orpierc  file, strings should be enclosed in double quotes
       (").  A double quote character inside a string may be represented by \"
       .  The backslash character must be represented by doubling it (\\).

   INCLUDING OTHER RCFILES
       Syntax: include filename_string
       This  syntax  can  be used to include one run-configuration file within
       another.  This command could be used to load the default  orpierc  file
       (probably found in /etc/orpierc) within your personalized rcfile,
        {/.orpierc}. The filename string should be enclosed in quotes.

   SETTING CONFIGURATION VARIABLES
       Syntax: set variable=value_string
       Several configuration variables can be set using this syntax; check the
       CONFIGURATION VARIABLES description to see a list.  The  variables  are
       unquoted, but the values should be quoted strings.

   CREATING KEY BINDINGS
       Syntax: bind key_identifier operation
       This  command  will  bind a keypress to execute a calculator operation.
       The various operations, which should not be enclosed in quotes, may  be
       found  in the section on CALCULATOR OPERATIONS.  Key identifiers may be
       specified by strings that represent a single keypress, for example  "m"
       (quotes  included).  The  key  may  be  prefixed with "\\C" or "\\M" to
       represent Control or Meta (Alt) modifiers, respectively; note that  the
       backslash   must   be   doubled.   A   number   of  special  keys  lack
       single-character representations, so the following strings may be  used
       to represent them:

       *      "<esc>"

       *      "<tab>"

       *      "<enter>"

       *      "<return>"

       *      "<insert>"

       *      "<home>"

       *      "<end>"

       *      "<pageup>"

       *      "<pagedown>"

       *      "<space>"

       *      "<left>"

       *      "<right>"

       *      "<up>"

       *      "<down>"

       *      "<f1>" to "<f12>"

       Due  to  differences  between  various  terminal  emulators,  this  key
       identifier syntax may not be adequate to describe every keypress. As  a
       workaround,  Orpie  will also accept key identifiers in octal notation.
       As an example, you could use \024 (do not  enclose  it  in  quotes)  to
       represent Ctrl-T.

       Orpie  includes  a secondary executable, orpie-curses-keys, that prints
       out the key identifiers associated with keypresses.  You  may  find  it
       useful when customizing orpierc.

       Multiple keys may be bound to the same operation, if desired.

   REMOVING KEY BINDINGS
       Syntax:
       unbind_function key_identifier
       unbind_command key_identifier
       unbind_edit key_identifier
       unbind_browse key_identifier
       unbind_abbrev key_identifier
       unbind_variable key_identifier
       unbind_integer key_identifier
       These  commands  will  remove  key bindings associated with the various
       entry modes (functions, commands, editing operations,  etc.).  The  key
       identifiers  should  be  defined  using  the  syntax  described  in the
       previous section.

   CREATING KEY AUTO-BINDINGS
       Syntax: autobind key_identifier
       In order to make repetitive calculations more pleasant, Orpie offers an
       automatic  key  binding feature. When a function or command is executed
       using its abbreviation, one of the keys selected by the autobind syntax
       will be automatically bound to that operation (unless the operation has
       already been bound to a key). The current set of  autobindings  can  be
       viewed  in the help panel by executing command_cycle_help (bound to 'h'
       by default).

       The syntax for the key identifiers is provided in the previous section.

   CREATING OPERATION ABBREVIATIONS
       Syntax: abbrev operation_abbreviation operation
       You can use this syntax to set the abbreviations used within  Orpie  to
       represent  the  various  functions  and  commands.  A list of available
       operations may be found in  the  CALCULATOR  OPERATIONS  section.   The
       operation  abbreviations should be quoted strings, for example "sin" or
       "log".

       Orpie performs autocompletion on these abbreviations, allowing  you  to
       type usually just a few letters in order to select the desired command.
       The order of the autocompletion matches will be the same as  the  order
       in  which  the  abbreviations  are registered by the rcfile--so you may
       wish to place the more commonly used operation abbreviations earlier in
       the list.

       Multiple abbreviations may be bound to the same operation, if desired.

   REMOVING OPERATION ABBREVIATIONS
       Syntax: unabbrev operation_abbreviation
       This  syntax  can  be  used  to  remove  an operation abbreviation. The
       operation abbreviations should be quoted strings, as described  in  the
       previous section.

   CREATING MACROS
       Syntax: macro key_identifier macro_string
       You can use this syntax to cause a single keypress (the key_identifier)
       to be interpreted as the series of keypresses listed  in  macro_string.
       The  syntax  for defining a keypress is the same as that defined in the
       section on CREATING KEY BINDINGS.  The macro string should be a list of
       whitespace-separated  keypresses,  e.g.   "2  <return>  2 +" (including
       quotes).

       This macro syntax provides a way to create small programs;  by  way  of
       example,  the  default  orpierc  file  includes  macros  for the base 2
       logarithm  and  the  binary  entropy  function  (bound  to  L  and   H,
       respectively),  as  well  as  ``register''  variable shortcuts (<f1> to
       <f12>).

       Macros may call other macros recursively. However,  take  care  that  a
       macro  does  not  call  itself  recursively;  Orpie  will  not trap the
       infinite loop.

       Note that operation abbreviations may be accessed  within  macros.  For
       example,  macro  "A" "' a b o u t <return>" would bind A to display the
       ``about Orpie'' screen.

   CREATING UNITS
       Syntax:
       base_unit unit_symbol preferred_prefix
       unit unit_symbol unit_definition
       Units are defined in a two-step process:

       1.     Define a set of orthogonal ``base units.'' All other units  must
              be  expressible in terms of these base units. The base units can
              be given a preferred SI prefix, which will be used whenever  the
              units  are standardized (e.g. via ustand).  The unit symbols and
              preferred prefixes should all be quoted strings;  to  prefer  no
              prefix, use the empty string ("").

       It  is  expected  that most users will use the fundamental SI units for
       base units.

       2.     Define all  other  units  in  terms  of  either  base  units  or
              previously-defined  units.   Again,  the  unit  symbol  and unit
              definition should be quoted strings. The definition should  take
              the  form  of  a  numeric value followed by a units string, e.g.
              "2.5_kN*m/s". See the UNITS FORMATTING section for more  details
              on the unit string format.

   CREATING CONSTANTS
       Syntax: constant constant_symbol constant_definition
       This  syntax  can  be  used  to  define  a  physical constant. Both the
       constant symbol and definition must be  quoted  strings.  The  constant
       definition should be a numeric constant followed by a units string e.g.
       "1.60217733e-19_C".  All units used in  the  constant  definition  must
       already have been defined.

CONFIGURATION VARIABLES

       The  following  configuration  variables may be set as described in the
       SETTING CONFIGURATION VARIABLES section.

       *      datadir
              This variable should be set to the full path of the  Orpie  data
              directory,  which  will  contain the calculator state save file,
              temporary buffers, etc.  The default directory is "\~/.orpie/".

       *      editor
              This variable may be  set  to  the  fullscreen  editor  of  your
              choice.  The  default  value is "vi". It is recommended that you
              choose an editor that offers horizontal scrolling  in  place  of
              word  wrapping,  so  that  the  columns of large matrices can be
              properly aligned. (The Vim editor could be used in this  fashion
              by setting editor to "vim -c 'set nowrap'".)

       *      hide_help
              Set  this variable to "true" to hide the left help/status panel,
              or leave it on the default of "false" to display the help panel.

       *      conserve_memory
              Set this variable to "true" to minimize memory usage,  or  leave
              it  on  the default of "false" to improve rendering performance.
              (By default, Orpie caches multiple string representations of all
              stack  elements.  Very  large  integers  in  particular  require
              significant computation for string  representation,  so  caching
              these strings can make display updates much faster.)

CALCULATOR OPERATIONS

       Every calculator operation can be made available to the interface using
       the syntax described in the  sections  on  CREATING  KEY  BINDINGS  and
       CREATING  OPERATION  ABBREVIATIONS.   The  following is a list of every
       available operation.

   FUNCTIONS
       The following operations are functions--that is, they will  consume  at
       least  one  argument  from  the  stack.  Orpie will generally abort the
       computation and provide an informative  error  message  if  a  function
       cannot  be successfully applied (for example, if you try to compute the
       transpose of something that is not a matrix).

       For the exact integer data type, basic arithmetic operations will yield
       an  exact integer result. Division of two exact integers will yield the
       quotient of the division. The more complicated functions will generally
       promote  the  integer to a real number, and as such the arithmetic will
       no longer be exact.

       *      function_10_x
              Raise 10 to the power of the  last  stack  element  (inverse  of
              function_log10).

       *      function_abs
              Compute the absolute value of the last stack element.

       *      function_acos
              Compute  the  inverse cosine of the last stack element. For real
              numbers, The result  will  be  provided  either  in  degrees  or
              radians, depending on the angle mode of the calculator.

       *      function_acosh
              Compute the inverse hyperbolic cosine of the last stack element.

       *      function_add
              Add last two stack elements.

       *      function_arg
              Compute the argument (phase angle of complex number) of the last
              stack element. The value will be provided in either  degrees  or
              radians, depending on the current angle mode of the calculator.

       *      function_asin
              Compute  the  inverse  sine  of the last stack element. For real
              numbers, The result  will  be  provided  either  in  degrees  or
              radians, depending on the angle mode of the calculator.

       *      function_asinh
              Compute the inverse hyperbolic sine of the last stack element.

       *      function_atan
              Compute  the inverse tangent of the last stack element. For real
              numbers, The result  will  be  provided  either  in  degrees  or
              radians, depending on the angle mode of the calculator.

       *      function_atanh
              Compute  the  inverse  hyperbolic  tangent  of  the  last  stack
              element.

       *      function_binomial_coeff
              Compute the binomial coefficient (``n choose k'') formed by  the
              last  two  stack  elements.  If  these  arguments  are real, the
              coefficient is computed using a fast approximation to the log of
              the  gamma  function,  and  therefore  the  result is subject to
              rounding errors. For exact integer arguments, the coefficient is
              computed  using exact arithmetic; this has the potential to be a
              slow operation.

       *      function_ceiling
              Compute the ceiling of the last stack element.

       *      function_convert_units
              Convert stack element 2 to an equivalent expression in the units
              of element 1. Element 1 should be real-valued, and its magnitude
              will be ignored when computing the conversion.

       *      function_cos
              Compute the cosine of the last stack element. If the argument is
              real,  it  will  be  assumed  to  be  either degrees or radians,
              depending on the angle mode of the calculator.

       *      function_cosh
              Compute the hyperbolic cosine of the last stack element.

       *      function_conj
              Compute the complex conjugate of the last stack element.

       *      function_div
              Divide element 2 by element 1.

       *      function_erf
              Compute the error function of the last stack element.

       *      function_erfc
              Compute the complementary  error  function  of  the  last  stack
              element.

       *      function_eval
              Obtain the contents of the variable in the last stack position.

       *      function_exp
              Evaluate the exponential function of the last stack element.

       *      function_factorial
              Compute  the  factorial  of  the  last stack element. For a real
              argument, this is computed using a  fast  approximation  to  the
              gamma  function,  and  therefore  the  result  may be subject to
              rounding errors (or overflow). For an  exact  integer  argument,
              the  factorial  is computed using exact arithmetic; this has the
              potential to be a slow operation.

       *      function_floor
              Compute the floor of the last stack element.

       *      function_gamma
              Compute the Euler gamma function of the last stack element.

       *      function_gcd
              Compute the greatest  common  divisor  of  the  last  two  stack
              elements.  This  operation  may  be applied only to integer type
              data.

       *      function_im
              Compute the imaginary part of the last stack element.

       *      function_inv
              Compute the multiplicative inverse of the last stack element.

       *      function_lcm
              Compute  the  least  common  multiple  of  the  last  two  stack
              elements.  This  operation  may  be applied only to integer type
              data.

       *      function_ln
              Compute the natural logarithm of the last stack element.

       *      function_lngamma
              Compute the natural logarithm of the Euler gamma function of the
              last stack element.

       *      function_log10
              Compute the base-10 logarithm of the last stack element.

       *      function_maximum
              Find  the  maximum  values  of each of the columns of a real NxM
              matrix, returning a 1xM matrix as a result.

       *      function_minimum
              Find the minimum values of each of the columns  of  a  real  NxM
              matrix, returning a 1xM matrix as a result.

       *      function_mean
              Compute  the  sample  means of each of the columns of a real NxM
              matrix, returning a 1xM matrix as a result.

       *      function_mod
              Compute element 2 mod element 1. This operation can  be  applied
              only to integer type data.

       *      function_mult
              Multiply last two stack elements.

       *      function_neg
              Negate last stack element.

       *      function_permutation
              Compute  the  permutation coefficient determined by the last two
              stack elements 'n' and 'k': the number of ways of  obtaining  an
              ordered subset of k elements from a set of n elements.  If these
              arguments are real, the coefficient is  computed  using  a  fast
              approximation  to  the  log of the gamma function, and therefore
              the result is subject to  rounding  errors.  For  exact  integer
              arguments,  the  coefficient is computed using exact arithmetic;
              this has the potential to be a slow operation.

       *      function_pow
              Raise element 2 to the power of element 1.

       *      function_purge
              Delete the variable in the last stack position.

       *      function_re
              Compute the real part of the last stack element.

       *      function_sin
              Compute the sine of the last stack element. If the  argument  is
              real,  it  will  be  assumed  to  be  either degrees or radians,
              depending on the angle mode of the calculator.

       *      function_sinh
              Compute the hyperbolic sine of the last stack element.

       *      function_solve_linear
              Solve a linear system of the form Ax = b, where A and b are  the
              last  two elements on the stack. A must be a square matrix and b
              must be a matrix with one column. This function does not compute
              inv(A),  but  obtains  the  solution  by  a  more  efficient  LU
              decomposition  method.   This  function  is   recommended   over
              explicitly computing the inverse, especially when solving linear
              systems  with  relatively  large  dimension   or   with   poorly
              conditioned matrices.

       *      function_sq
              Square the last stack element.

       *      function_sqrt
              Compute the square root of the last stack element.

       *      function_standardize_units
              Convert the last stack element to an equivalent expression using
              the SI standard base units (kg, m, s, etc.).

       *      function_stdev_unbiased
              Compute the unbiased sample standard deviation of  each  of  the
              columns  of  a  real  NxM  matrix,  returning  a 1xM matrix as a
              result. (Compare to HP48's sdev function.)

       *      function_stdev_biased
              Compute the biased (population)  sample  standard  deviation  of
              each of the columns of a real NxM matrix, returning a 1xM matrix
              as a result. (Compare to HP48's psdev function.)

       *      function_store
              Store element 2 in (variable) element 1.

       *      function_sub
              Subtract element 1 from element 2.

       *      function_sumsq
              Sum the squares of each of the columns of  a  real  NxM  matrix,
              returning a 1xM matrix as a result.

       *      function_tan
              Compute  the  tangent of the last stack element. If the argument
              is real, it will be assumed to be  either  degrees  or  radians,
              depending on the angle mode of the calculator.

       *      function_tanh
              Compute the hyperbolic tangent of the last stack element.

       *      function_to_int
              Convert a real number to an integer type.

       *      function_to_real
              Convert an integer type to a real number.

       *      function_total
              Sum  each  of  the columns of a real NxM matrix, returning a 1xM
              matrix as a result.

       *      function_trace
              Compute the trace of a square matrix.

       *      function_transpose
              Compute the matrix transpose of the last stack element.

       *      function_unit_value
              Drop the units of the last stack element.

       *      function_utpn
              Compute the upper tail probability of a normal distribution.
              UTPN(m, v, x) = Integrate[ 1/Sqrt[2 Pi v]  Exp[-(m-y)^2/(2  v)],
              {y, x, Infinity}]

       *      function_var_unbiased
              Compute the unbiased sample variance of each of the columns of a
              real NxM matrix, returning a 1xM matrix as a result. (Compare to
              HP48's var function.)

       *      function_var_biased
              Compute  the  biased (population) sample variance of each of the
              columns of a real NxM  matrix,  returning  a  1xM  matrix  as  a
              result. (Compare to HP48's pvar function.)

   COMMANDS
       The  following operations are referred to as commands; they differ from
       functions because  they  do  not  take  an  argument.  Many  calculator
       interface settings are implemented as commands.

       *      command_about
              Display a nifty ``about Orpie'' credits screen.

       *      command_begin_abbrev
              Begin entry of an operation abbreviation.

       *      command_begin_browsing
              Enter stack browsing mode.

       *      command_begin_constant
              Begin entry of a physical constant.

       *      command_begin_variable
              Begin entry of a variable name.

       *      command_bin
              Set the base of exact integer representation to 2 (binary).

       *      command_clear
              Clear all elements from the stack.

       *      command_cycle_base
              Cycle the base of exact integer representation between 2, 8, 10,
              and 16 (bin, oct, dec, and hex).

       *      command_cycle_help
              Cycle through multiple  help  pages.  The  first  page  displays
              commonly used bindings, and the second page displays the current
              autobindings.

       *      command_dec
              Set the base of exact integer representation to 10 (decimal).

       *      command_deg
              Set the angle mode to degrees.

       *      command_drop
              Drop the last element off the stack.

       *      command_dup
              Duplicate the last stack element.

       *      command_enter_pi
              Enter 3.1415...  on the stack.

       *      command_hex
              Set  the  base   of   exact   integer   representation   to   16
              (hexadecimal).

       *      command_oct
              Set the base of exact integer representation to 8 (octal).

       *      command_polar
              Set the complex display mode to polar.

       *      command_rad
              Set the angle mode to radians.

       *      command_rand
              Generate a random real-valued number between 0 (inclusive) and 1
              (exclusive). The deviates are uniformly distributed.

       *      command_rect
              Set the complex display mode to rectangular (cartesian).

       *      command_refresh
              Refresh the display.

       *      command_swap
              Swap stack elements 1 and 2.

       *      command_quit
              Quit Orpie.

       *      command_toggle_angle_mode
              Toggle the angle mode between degrees and radians.

       *      command_toggle_complex_mode
              Toggle the complex display mode between rectangular and polar.

       *      command_undo
              Undo the last calculator operation.

       *      command_view
              View the last stack element in an external fullscreen editor.

       *      command_edit_input
              Create a new stack element using an external editor.

   EDIT OPERATIONS
       The following operations are related  to  editing  during  data  entry.
       These  commands  cannot  be  made available as operation abbreviations,
       since abbreviations are  not  accessible  while  entering  data.  These
       operations should be made available as single keypresses using the bind
       keyword.

       *      edit_angle
              Begin entering the phase angle of a complex number. (Orpie  will
              assume  the  angle is in either degrees or radians, depending on
              the current angle mode.)

       *      edit_backspace
              Delete the last character entered.

       *      edit_begin_integer
              Begin entering an exact integer.

       *      edit_begin_units
              Begin appending units to a numeric expression.

       *      edit_complex
              Begin entering a complex number.

       *      edit_enter
              Enter the data that is currently being edited.

       *      edit_matrix
              Begin entering a matrix, or begin entering the  next  row  of  a
              matrix.

       *      edit_minus
              Enter a minus sign in input.

       *      edit_scientific_notation_base
              Begin  entering  the  scientific  notation  exponent  of  a real
              number, or the base of an exact integer.

       *      edit_separator
              Begin editing the next element of a complex  number  or  matrix.
              (This will insert a comma between elements.)

   BROWSING OPERATIONS
       The  following  list  of operations is available only in stack browsing
       mode.  As abbreviations are unavailable while browsing the stack, these
       operations should be bound to single keypresses using the bind keyword.

       *      browse_echo
              Echo the currently selected element to stack level 1.

       *      browse_end
              Exit stack browsing mode.

       *      browse_drop
              Drop the currently selected stack element.

       *      browse_dropn
              Drop all stack elements below the current selection (inclusive).

       *      browse_keep
              Drop  all  stack elements except the current selection. (This is
              complementary to browse_drop.

       *      browse_keepn
              Drop  all   stack   elements   above   the   current   selection
              (non-inclusive). (This is complementary to browse_dropn.

       *      browse_next_line
              Move the selection cursor down one line.

       *      browse_prev_line
              Move the selection cursor up one line.

       *      browse_rolldown
              Cyclically  ``roll'' stack elements downward, below the selected
              element (inclusive).

       *      browse_rollup
              Cyclically ``roll'' stack elements upward,  below  the  selected
              element (inclusive) .

       *      browse_scroll_left
              Scroll  the selected element to the left (for viewing very large
              entries such as matrices).

       *      browse_scroll_right
              Scroll the selected element to the right.

       *      browse_view
              View the  currently  selected  stack  element  in  a  fullscreen
              editor.

       *      browse_edit
              Edit  the  currently  selected  stack  element using an external
              editor.

   ABBREVIATION ENTRY OPERATIONS
       The following list of operations is available  only  while  entering  a
       function   or  command  abbreviation,  or  while  entering  a  physical
       constant. These operations must be bound to single keypresses using the
       bind keyword.

       *      abbrev_backspace
              Delete a character from the abbreviation string.

       *      abbrev_enter
              Execute the operation associated with the selected abbreviation.

       *      abbrev_exit
              Cancel abbreviation entry.

   VARIABLE ENTRY OPERATIONS
       The  following  list  of  operations is available only while entering a
       variable  name.  As  abbreviations  are  unavailable   while   entering
       variables,  these operations should be bound to single keypresses using
       the bind keyword.

       *      variable_backspace
              Delete a character from the variable name.

       *      variable_cancel
              Cancel entry of the variable name.

       *      variable_complete
              Autocomplete the variable name.

       *      variable_enter
              Enter the variable name on the stack.

   INTEGER ENTRY OPERATIONS
       The following operation is available only while entering an integer; it
       can  be  made  accessible  by binding it to a single keypress using the
       bind keyword.

       *      integer_cancel
              Cancel entry of an integer.

SEE ALSO

       orpie(1), orpie-curses-keys(1)

AUTHOR

       This manpage is written by Paul J. Pelzl <pelzlpj@eecs.umich.edu>.

configuration file for the Orpi13cSeptember 2007                    ORPIERC(5)