Provided by: srecord_1.56-1build1_amd64 bug

NAME

       srec_mif - Memory Initialization File (MIF) format

DESCRIPTION

       This format was invented by Altera.

       An  ASCII  text  file  (with  the  extension .mif) that specifies the initial content of a
       memory block (CAM, RAM, or ROM), that is, the initial values for each address.  This  file
       is   used   during  project  compilation  and/or  simulation.  You  can  create  a  Memory
       Initialization File in the Memory Editor, the In‐System  Memory  Content  Editor,  or  the
       Quartus II Text Editor.

       A  Memory  Initialization  File  serves  as an input file for memory initialization in the
       Compiler and Simulator. You can also use  a  Hexadecimal  (Intel‐Format)  File  (.hex)  to
       provide memory initialization data.

       A Memory Initialization File contains the initial values for each address in the memory. A
       separate file is required for each memory block. In a Memory Initialization File, you must
       specify  the  memory  depth and width values. In addition, you can specify data radixes as
       binary (BIN), hexadecimal (HEX), octal (OCT), signed decimal (DEC),  or  unsigned  decimal
       (UNS)  to  display  and  interpret  addresses  and data values. Data values must match the
       specified data radix.

       When creating a Memory Initialization File in the Quartus II Text Editor, you  must  start
       with the DEPTH, WIDTH, ADDRESS_RADIX and DATA_RADIX keywords. You can use Tab "" and Space
       " " characters as separators, and insert multiple lines of comments with the  percent  "%"
       character,  or  a  single  comment  with  double dash "--" characters.  Address:data pairs
       represent data contained inside certain memory addresses and you must place  them  between
       the CONTENT BEGIN and END keywords, as shown in the following examples.
              %  multiple‐line comment
              multiple‐line comment  %
              -- single‐line comment
              DEPTH = 32;                   -- The size of data in bits
              WIDTH = 8;                    -- The size of memory in words
              ADDRESS_RADIX = HEX;          -- The radix for address values
              DATA_RADIX = BIN;             -- The radix for data values
              CONTENT                       -- start of (address : data pairs)
              BEGIN
              00 : 00000000;                -- memory address : data
              01 : 00000001;
              02 : 00000010;
              03 : 00000011;
              04 : 00000100;
              05 : 00000101;
              06 : 00000110;
              07 : 00000111;
              08 : 00001000;
              09 : 00001001;
              0A : 00001010;
              0B : 00001011;
              0C : 00001100;
              END;

       There are several ways to specify the address and data, as seen in the following table:

       Notation            Interpretation             Example
       A : D;              Addr[A] = D                2 : 4
                                                      Address: 01234567
                                                      Data:    00400000

       [A0..A1] : D;       Addr[A0] to [A1] contain   [0..7] : 6
       (See note below.)   data D                     Address: 01234567
                                                      Data:    66666666
       [A0..A1] : D0 D1;   Addr[A0] = D0,             [0..7] : 5 6
       (See note below.)   Addr[A0+1] = D1,           Address: 01234567
                           Add [A0+2] = D0,           Data:    56565656
                           Addr[A0+3] = D1,
                           until A0+n = A1
       A : D0 D1 D2;       Addr[A] = D0,              2 : 4 5 6
                           Addr[A+1] = D1,            Address: 01234567
                           Addr[A+2] = D2             Data:    00456000

       Note: The address range forms are limited in SRecord, the range  must  be  less  than  255
       bytes.  SRecord will never write an address range.

       Note: When reading MIF file, SRecord will round up the number of bits in the WIDTH to be a
       multiple of 8.  Multi‐byte values will be laid down in memory as big‐endian.

       An ASCII text file (with the extension .mif) that  specifies  the  initial  content  of  a
       memory  block (CAM, RAM, or ROM), that is, the initial values for each address.  This file
       is used during project compilation and/or simulation.  A MIF contains the  initial  values
       for  each  address  in  the memory.  In a MIF, you are also required to specify the memory
       depth and width values.  In addition, you can specify the  radixes  used  to  display  and
       interpret addresses and data values.

SIZE MULTIPLIER

       In  general,  binary data will expand in sized by approximately 3.29 times when 8‐bit data
       is represented with this format (16 bit = 2.75, 32 bit = 2.47, 64 bit = 2.34).

EXAMPLE

       Following is a sample MIF:
              DEPTH = 32; % Memory depth and width are required %
              % DEPTH is the number of addresses %
              WIDTH = 14; % WIDTH is the number of bits of data per word %
              % DEPTH and WIDTH should be entered as decimal numbers %
              ADDRESS_RADIX = HEX; % Address and value radixes are required %
              DATA_RADIX = HEX; % Enter BIN, DEC, HEX, OCT, or UNS; unless %
                                % otherwise specified, radixes = HEX %
               --Specify values for addresses, which can be single address or range
              CONTENT
              BEGIN
              [0..F]: 3FFF;     % Range: Every address from 0 to F = 3FFF %
              6     :    F;     % Single address: Address 6 = F %
              8     :    F E 5; % Range starting from specific address %
              --                % Addr[8] = F, Addr[9] = E, Addr[A] = 5 %
              END;

REFERENCE

       The    above    information    was     gleaned     from     the     following     sources:
       http://www.altera.com/support/software/nativelink/quartus2/glossary/def_mif.html
       http://www.mil.ufl.edu/4712/docs/mif_help.pdf

COPYRIGHT

       srec_mif version 1.56
       Copyright (C) 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010
       Peter Miller

       The srec_mif program comes with ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY;  for  details  use  the  'srec_mif
       -VERSion  License'  command.  This is free software and you are welcome to redistribute it
       under certain conditions; for details use the 'srec_mif -VERSion License' command.

AUTHOR

       Peter Miller   E‐Mail:   pmiller@opensource.org.au
       /\/\*             WWW:   http://miller.emu.id.au/pmiller/