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NAME

       lsort -

 SYNOPSIS
       lsort ?options? list
_________________________________________________________________

 DESCRIPTION
        list ()lsort     O(n log   n)

        ASCII    list    ():

       -ascii               ASCII ()(collation)

       -dictionary            -ascii(a)      tie-breaker   (b)     -dictionary
                           bigBoy    bigbang  bigboy  x10y     x9y  x11y

       -integer

       -real

       -command command     command     command    Tcl ()

       -increasing         ( )

       -decreasing         ( )

       -index index        list    Tcl lsort    index index    end    ,   end- |
                           index  sorts  on  a sublist element offset from the |
                           end
                                  lsort -integer -index 1 {{First 24} {Second 18} {Third 30}}
                            {Second 18} {First 24} {Third 30},                 |
                                  lsort -index end-1 {{a 1 e i} {b 2 3 f g} {c 4 5 6 d h}}|
                            {c 4 5 6 d h} {a 1 e i} {b 2 3 f g}.   -command

       -unique             (duplicate)    -index 0 {1 a}  {1 b}    {1 b}

 NOTES
       The options to lsort only control what sort of comparison is used,  and
       do  not  necessarily constrain what the values themselves actually are.
       This distinction is only noticeable when the  list  to  be  sorted  has
       fewer than two elements.

       The  lsort  command  is reentrant, meaning it is safe to use as part of
       the implementation of a command used in the -command option.

 EXAMPLES
       Sorting a list using ASCII sorting:
              % lsort {a10 B2 b1 a1 a2}
              B2 a1 a10 a2 b1

       Sorting a list using Dictionary sorting:
              % lsort -dictionary {a10 B2 b1 a1 a2}
              a1 a2 a10 b1 B2

       Sorting lists of integers:
              % lsort -integer {5 3 1 2 11 4}
              1 2 3 4 5 11
              % lsort -integer {1 2 0x5 7 0 4 -1}
              -1 0 1 2 4 0x5 7

       Sorting lists of floating-point numbers:
              % lsort -real {5 3 1 2 11 4}
              1 2 3 4 5 11
              % lsort -real {.5 0.07e1 0.4 6e-1}
              0.4 .5 6e-1 0.07e1

       Sorting using indices:
              % # Note the space character before the c
              % lsort {{a 5} { c 3} {b 4} {e 1} {d 2}}
              { c 3} {a 5} {b 4} {d 2} {e 1}
              % lsort -index 0 {{a 5} { c 3} {b 4} {e 1} {d 2}}
              {a 5} {b 4} { c 3} {d 2} {e 1}
              % lsort -index 1 {{a 5} { c 3} {b 4} {e 1} {d 2}}
              {e 1} {d 2} { c 3} {b 4} {a 5}

       Stripping duplicate values using sorting:
              % lsort -unique {a b c a b c a b c}
              a b c

       More complex sorting using a comparison function:
              % proc compare {a b} {
                  set a0 [lindex $a 0]
                  set b0 [lindex $b 0]
                  if {$a0 < $b0} {
                      return -1
                  } elseif {$a0 > $b0} {
                      return 1
                  }
                  return [string compare [lindex $a 1] [lindex $b 1]]
              }
              % lsort -command compare \
                      {{3 apple} {0x2 carrot} {1 dingo} {2 banana}}
              {1 dingo} {2 banana} {0x2 carrot} {3 apple}

 SEE ALSO
       lappend(n),  lindex(n),  linsert(n),  list(n),  llength(n),  lrange(n),
       lreplace(n), lsearch(n)

 KEYWORDS
       element, list, order, sort

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       2001/09/06

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