Provided by: erlang-manpages_16.b.3-dfsg-1ubuntu2_all bug

NAME

       erl_error - Error Print Routines

DESCRIPTION

       This  module  contains some error printing routines taken from Advanced Programming in the
       UNIX Environment by W. Richard Stevens.

       These functions are all called in  the  same  manner  as  printf(),  i.e.  with  a  string
       containing  format  specifiers  followed  by a list of corresponding arguments. All output
       from these functions is to stderr.

EXPORTS

       void erl_err_msg(FormatStr, ... )

              Types:

                 const char *FormatStr;

              The message provided by the caller is printed. This function is  simply  a  wrapper
              for fprintf().

       void erl_err_quit(FormatStr, ... )

              Types:

                 const char *FormatStr;

              Use this function when a fatal error has occurred that is not due to a system call.
              The message provided by the caller is printed and the process  terminates  with  an
              exit value of 1. The function does not return.

       void erl_err_ret(FormatStr, ... )

              Types:

                 const char *FormatStr;

              Use this function after a failed system call. The message provided by the caller is
              printed followed by a string describing the reason for failure.

       void erl_err_sys(FormatStr, ... )

              Types:

                 const char *FormatStr;

              Use this function after a failed system call. The message provided by the caller is
              printed  followed  by  a  string describing the reason for failure, and the process
              terminates with an exit value of 1. The function does not return.

ERROR REPORTING

       Most functions in erl_interface report failures to the caller by returning some  otherwise
       meaningless  value  (typically  NULL  or  a  negative number). As this only tells you that
       things did not go well, you will have to examine the error code in erl_errno if  you  want
       to find out more about the failure.

EXPORTS

       volatile int erl_errno

              erl_errno  is  initially  (at  program  startup)  zero  and  is  then  set  by many
              erl_interface functions on failure to a non-zero error code to indicate  what  kind
              of  error  it  encountered.  A  successful function call might change erl_errno (by
              calling some other function that fails), but no function will ever set it to  zero.
              This means that you cannot use erl_errno to see if a function call failed. Instead,
              each function reports failure in its own  way  (usually  by  returning  a  negative
              number or NULL), in which case you can examine erl_errno for details.

              erl_errno uses the error codes defined in your system's <errno.h>.

          Note:
              Actually,  erl_errno is a "modifiable lvalue" (just like ISO C defines errno to be)
              rather than a variable. This means it might be implemented as  a  macro  (expanding
              to,  e.g., *_erl_errno()). For reasons of thread- (or task-)safety, this is exactly
              what we do on most platforms.