Provided by: exim4-base_4.96-3ubuntu1_amd64 bug

NAME

       exim4 - a Mail Transfer Agent

SYNOPSIS

       exim4 [options] arguments ...
       mailq [options] arguments ...
       rsmtp [options] arguments ...
       rmail [options] arguments ...
       runq [options] arguments ...
       newaliases [options] arguments ...

DESCRIPTION


       Exim  is  a  mail  transfer agent (MTA) developed at the University of Cambridge.  It is a
       large program with very many facilities. For  a  full  specification,  see  the  reference
       manual. This man page contains only a description of the command line options. It has been
       automatically generated from the reference  manual  source,  hopefully  without  too  much
       mangling.

       Like  other  MTAs,  Exim  replaces  Sendmail, and is normally called by user agents (MUAs)
       using the path /usr/sbin/sendmail when they submit messages for delivery  (some  operating
       systems  use  /usr/lib/sendmail).  This  path is normally set up as a symbolic link to the
       Exim binary. It may also be used by boot scripts to start the Exim daemon. Many of  Exim's
       command  line  options  are  compatible  with  Sendmail  so  that  it can act as a drop-in
       replacement.

DEFAULT ACTION


       If no options are present that require a specific action (such as starting the daemon or a
       queue runner, testing an address, receiving a message in a specific format, or listing the
       queue), and there are no arguments on the command line, Exim outputs a brief message about
       itself and exits.

       However,  if  there  is at least one command line argument, -bm (accept a local message on
       the standard input, with the arguments specifying the recipients) is  assumed.  Thus,  for
       example,  if  Exim is installed in /usr/sbin, you can send a message from the command line
       like this:

         /usr/sbin/exim4 -i <recipient-address(es)>
         <message content, including all the header lines>
         CTRL-D

       The -i option prevents a line containing just a dot from terminating the message. Only  an
       end-of-file (generated by typing CTRL-D if the input is from a terminal) does so.

SETTING OPTIONS BY PROGRAM NAME


       If an Exim binary is called using one of the names listed in this section (typically via a
       symbolic link), certain options are assumed.

       mailq  Behave as if the option -bp were present before any other options.  The -bp  option
              requests a listing of the contents of the mail queue on the standard output.

       rsmtp  Behaves  as  if  the  option  -bS  were  present  before  any  other  options,  for
              compatibility with Smail. The -bS option  is  used  for  reading  in  a  number  of
              messages in batched SMTP format.

       rmail  Behave  as  if  the  -i and -oee options were present before any other options, for
              compatibility with Smail. The name rmail is used  as  an  interface  by  some  UUCP
              systems.  The -i option specifies that a dot on a line by itself does not terminate
              a non-SMTP message; -oee requests that errors  detected  in  non-SMTP  messages  be
              reported by emailing the sender.

       runq   Behave as if the option -q were present before any other options, for compatibility
              with Smail. The -q option causes a single queue runner process to  be  started.  It
              processes the queue once, then exits.

       newaliases
              Behave   as  if  the  option  -bi  were  present  before  any  other  options,  for
              compatibility with Sendmail. This option is used for  rebuilding  Sendmail's  alias
              file.  Exim does not have the concept of a single alias file, but can be configured
              to run a specified command if called with the -bi option.

OPTIONS


       --        This is a pseudo-option whose only purpose  is  to  terminate  the  options  and
                 therefore  to  cause  subsequent  command  line items to be treated as arguments
                 rather than options, even if they begin with hyphens.

       --help    This option causes Exim to output a few sentences stating what it is.  The  same
                 output  is  generated  if  the  Exim  binary  is  called  with no options and no
                 arguments.

       --version This option is an alias for -bV and causes version information to be displayed.

       -Ac       -Am These options are used by Sendmail for selecting configuration files and are
                 ignored by Exim.

       -B<type>  This  is  a  Sendmail  option for selecting 7 or 8 bit processing. Exim is 8-bit
                 clean; it ignores this option.

       -bd       This option runs Exim as a daemon, awaiting incoming SMTP  connections.  Usually
                 the  -bd option is combined with the -q<time> option, to specify that the daemon
                 should also initiate periodic queue runs.

                 The -bd option can be  used  only  by  an  admin  user.  If  either  of  the  -d
                 (debugging)  or  -v  (verifying) options are set, the daemon does not disconnect
                 from the controlling terminal. When running this  way,  it  can  be  stopped  by
                 pressing ctrl-C.

                 By  default,  Exim listens for incoming connections to the standard SMTP port on
                 all the host's running interfaces. However, it is possible to  listen  on  other
                 ports, on multiple ports, and only on specific interfaces.

                 When  a  listening  daemon  is  started without the use of -oX (that is, without
                 overriding the normal configuration), it writes its process id to a file  called
                 /run/exim4/exim.pid. This location can be overridden by setting PID_FILE_PATH in
                 Local/Makefile. The file is written while Exim is still running as root.

                 When -oX is used on the command line to start a listening daemon, the process id
                 is  not written to the normal pid file path. However, -oP can be used to specify
                 a path on the command line if a pid file is required.

                 The SIGHUP signal can be used to cause the daemon  to  re-execute  itself.  This
                 should  be  done  whenever  Exim's  configuration  file,  or  any  file  that is
                 incorporated into it by means of the .include facility,  is  changed,  and  also
                 whenever a new version of Exim is installed. It is not necessary to do this when
                 other files that are referenced  from  the  configuration  (for  example,  alias
                 files) are changed, because these are reread each time they are used.

       -bdf      This option has the same effect as -bd except that it never disconnects from the
                 controlling terminal, even when no debugging is specified.

       -be       Run Exim in expansion testing mode. Exim discards its root privilege, to prevent
                 ordinary  users from using this mode to read otherwise inaccessible files. If no
                 arguments are given, Exim runs  interactively,  prompting  for  lines  of  data.
                 Otherwise, it processes each argument in turn.

                 If  Exim was built with USE_READLINE=yes in Local/Makefile, it tries to load the
                 libreadline library dynamically whenever the -be option is used without  command
                 line  arguments.  If successful, it uses the readline() function, which provides
                 extensive line-editing facilities, for reading the test data. A line history  is
                 supported.

                 Long  expansion  expressions  can be split over several lines by using backslash
                 continuations. As in Exim's runtime configuration, white space at the  start  of
                 continuation  lines is ignored. Each argument or data line is passed through the
                 string expansion mechanism, and the result is output. Variable values  from  the
                 configuration   file  (for  example,  $qualify_domain)  are  available,  but  no
                 message-specific values (such as $message_exim_id) are set, because  no  message
                 is being processed (but see -bem and -Mset).

                 Note:  If  you use this mechanism to test lookups, and you change the data files
                 or databases you are using, you must exit and restart  Exim  before  trying  the
                 same  lookup  again.  Otherwise, because each Exim process caches the results of
                 lookups, you will just get the same result as before.

                 Macro processing is done on lines before string-expansion:  new  macros  can  be
                 defined  and  macros  will  be  expanded.  Because macros in the config file are
                 often used for secrets, those are only available to admin users.

       -bem <filename>
                 This option operates like -be except that it must be followed by the name  of  a
                 file. For example:

                   exim4 -bem /tmp/testmessage

                 The  file  is  read  as  a message (as if receiving a locally-submitted non-SMTP
                 message) before any of the test  expansions  are  done.  Thus,  message-specific
                 variables  such  as  $message_size  and $header_from: are available. However, no
                 Received: header is added to the message. If the -t option  is  set,  recipients
                 are  read  from  the headers in the normal way, and are shown in the $recipients
                 variable. Note that recipients cannot be given  on  the  command  line,  because
                 further arguments are taken as strings to expand (just like -be).

       -bF <filename>
                 This  option  is  the  same  as -bf except that it assumes that the filter being
                 tested is a system filter. The additional commands that are  available  only  in
                 system filters are recognized.

       -bf <filename>
                 This  option  runs Exim in user filter testing mode; the file is the filter file
                 to be tested, and a test message must be supplied  on  the  standard  input.  If
                 there  are  no  message-dependent  tests  in  the  filter,  an empty file can be
                 supplied.

                 If you want to test a system filter file, use -bF instead of -bf.  You  can  use
                 both  -bF  and  -bf  on the same command, in order to test a system filter and a
                 user filter in the same run. For example:

                   exim4 -bF /system/filter -bf /user/filter </test/message

                 This is helpful when  the  system  filter  adds  header  lines  or  sets  filter
                 variables that are used by the user filter.

                 If the test filter file does not begin with one of the special lines

                   # Exim filter
                   # Sieve filter

                 it  is taken to be a normal .forward file, and is tested for validity under that
                 interpretation.

                 The result of an Exim command that uses -bf, provided no errors are detected, is
                 a  list of the actions that Exim would try to take if presented with the message
                 for real. More details of filter testing are  given  in  the  separate  document
                 entitled Exim's interfaces to mail filtering.

                 When  testing a filter file, the envelope sender can be set by the -f option, or
                 by a "From " line at the start of the  test  message.  Various  parameters  that
                 would  normally  be taken from the envelope recipient address of the message can
                 be set by means of additional command line options (see the next four options).

       -bfd <domain>
                 This sets the domain of the recipient address when a filter file is being tested
                 by means of the -bf option. The default is the value of $qualify_domain.

       -bfl <local part>
                 This  sets  the  local part of the recipient address when a filter file is being
                 tested by means of the -bf option. The default is the username  of  the  process
                 that  calls  Exim.  A  local  part should be specified with any prefix or suffix
                 stripped, because that is how it  appears  to  the  filter  when  a  message  is
                 actually being delivered.

       -bfp <prefix>
                 This  sets  the  prefix of the local part of the recipient address when a filter
                 file is being tested by means of the -bf option. The default is an empty prefix.

       -bfs <suffix>
                 This sets the suffix of the local part of the recipient address  when  a  filter
                 file is being tested by means of the -bf option. The default is an empty suffix.

       -bh <IP address>
                 This  option runs a fake SMTP session as if from the given IP address, using the
                 standard input and output. The IP address may include a port number at the  end,
                 after a full stop. For example:

                   exim4 -bh 10.9.8.7.1234
                   exim4 -bh fe80::a00:20ff:fe86:a061.5678

                 When  an IPv6 address is given, it is converted into canonical form. In the case
                 of the second example above, the value of $sender_host_address after  conversion
                 to the canonical form is fe80:0000:0000:0a00:20ff:fe86:a061.5678.

                 Comments  as  to  what is going on are written to the standard error file. These
                 include lines beginning with "LOG" for anything that  would  have  been  logged.
                 This  facility  is  provided  for  testing  configuration  options  for incoming
                 messages, to make sure they implement the required policy. For example, you  can
                 test your relay controls using -bh.

                 Warning  1:  You  can test features of the configuration that rely on ident (RFC
                 1413) information by using  the  -oMt  option.  However,  Exim  cannot  actually
                 perform  an  ident  callout  when testing using -bh because there is no incoming
                 SMTP connection.

                 Warning 2: Address verification callouts are also  skipped  when  testing  using
                 -bh. If you want these callouts to occur, use -bhc instead.

                 Messages  supplied  during  the  testing  session  are discarded, and nothing is
                 written to any of the real log files. There may be pauses when DNS  (and  other)
                 lookups  are taking place, and of course these may time out. The -oMi option can
                 be used to specify a specific IP interface and port if this  is  important,  and
                 -oMaa  and  -oMai  can  be  used  to  set parameters as if the SMTP session were
                 authenticated.

                 The exim_checkaccess utility is a "packaged" version of -bh  whose  output  just
                 states whether a given recipient address from a given host is acceptable or not.

                 Features  such  as  authentication and encryption, where the client input is not
                 plain text, cannot easily  be  tested  with  -bh.  Instead,  you  should  use  a
                 specialized SMTP test program such as swaks.

       -bhc <IP address>
                 This  option  operates  in the same way as -bh, except that address verification
                 callouts are performed if required. This includes consulting  and  updating  the
                 callout cache database.

       -bi       Sendmail interprets the -bi option as a request to rebuild its alias file.  Exim
                 does not have the concept of a single alias file, and so it  cannot  mimic  this
                 behaviour.  However,  calls  to  /usr/lib/sendmail  with  the -bi option tend to
                 appear in various scripts such  as  NIS  make  files,  so  the  option  must  be
                 recognized.

                 If  -bi  is  encountered,  the command specified by the bi_command configuration
                 option is run, under the uid and gid of the caller of Exim. If the -oA option is
                 used,  its  value  is  passed to the command as an argument.  The command set by
                 bi_command may not contain arguments. The  command  can  use  the  exim_dbmbuild
                 utility, or some other means, to rebuild alias files if this is required. If the
                 bi_command option is not set, calling Exim with -bi is a no-op.

       -bI:help  We  shall  provide  various  options  starting  -bI:  for  querying   Exim   for
                 information.   The  output  of  many  of  these  will  be  intended  for machine
                 consumption.  This one is not.  The -bI:help option asks Exim for a synopsis  of
                 supported  options beginning -bI:.  Use of any of these options shall cause Exim
                 to exit after producing the requested output.

       -bI:dscp  This option causes Exim to emit an alphabetically sorted list of all  recognised
                 DSCP names.

       -bI:sieve This  option  causes Exim to emit an alphabetically sorted list of all supported
                 Sieve protocol extensions on stdout, one per line.  This is  anticipated  to  be
                 useful  for ManageSieve (RFC 5804) implementations, in providing that protocol's
                 SIEVE  capability  response  line.   As  the  precise  list  may   depend   upon
                 compile-time  build  options,  which this option will adapt to, this is the only
                 way to guarantee a correct response.

       -bm       This  option  runs  an  Exim  receiving  process  that  accepts   an   incoming,
                 locally-generated message on the standard input. The recipients are given as the
                 command arguments (except when -t is also present - see  below).  Each  argument
                 can  be a comma-separated list of RFC 2822 addresses. This is the default option
                 for selecting the overall action of an Exim call; it  is  assumed  if  no  other
                 conflicting option is present.

                 If  any  addresses  in  the  message  are unqualified (have no domain), they are
                 qualified by the values of the qualify_domain or qualify_recipient  options,  as
                 appropriate.  The -bnq option (see below) provides a way of suppressing this for
                 special cases.

                 Policy checks on the contents of local messages can be enforced by means of  the
                 non-SMTP ACL.

                 The  return code is zero if the message is successfully accepted. Otherwise, the
                 action is controlled by the -oex option setting - see below.

                 The format of the message must be as defined  in  RFC  2822,  except  that,  for
                 compatibility with Sendmail and Smail, a line in one of the forms

                   From sender Fri Jan  5 12:55 GMT 1997
                   From sender Fri, 5 Jan 97 12:55:01

                 (with the weekday optional, and possibly with additional text after the date) is
                 permitted to appear at the  start  of  the  message.  There  appears  to  be  no
                 authoritative  specification  of  the format of this line. Exim recognizes it by
                 matching against the regular expression defined by the uucp_from_pattern option,
                 which can be changed if necessary.

                 The  specified  sender  is treated as if it were given as the argument to the -f
                 option, but if a -f option is also present, its argument is used  in  preference
                 to the address taken from the message. The caller of Exim must be a trusted user
                 for the sender of a message to be set in this way.

       -bmalware <filename>
                 This debugging option causes Exim to scan the given file or directory (depending
                 on  the  used  scanner  interface),  using  the malware scanning framework.  The
                 option of av_scanner  influences  this  option,  so  if  av_scanner's  value  is
                 dependent  upon an expansion then the expansion should have defaults which apply
                 to this invocation.  ACLs are not invoked, so if av_scanner  references  an  ACL
                 variable then that variable will never be populated and -bmalware will fail.

                 Exim will have changed working directory before resolving the filename, so using
                 fully qualified pathnames is advisable.  Exim will be running as the  Exim  user
                 when  it  tries to open the file, rather than as the invoking user.  This option
                 requires admin privileges.

                 The -bmalware option will not be extended to be more generally useful, there are
                 better  tools  for  file-scanning.   This  option  exists to help administrators
                 verify their Exim and AV scanner configuration.

       -bnq      By default, Exim automatically qualifies unqualified  addresses  (those  without
                 domains)  that  appear in messages that are submitted locally (that is, not over
                 TCP/IP).  This  qualification  applies  both  to  addresses  in  envelopes,  and
                 addresses  in header lines. Sender addresses are qualified using qualify_domain,
                 and recipient addresses using qualify_recipient (which defaults to the value  of
                 qualify_domain).

                 Sometimes,  qualification  is  not  wanted.  For example, if -bS (batch SMTP) is
                 being used to re-submit messages that originally came from  remote  hosts  after
                 content  scanning,  you probably do not want to qualify unqualified addresses in
                 header lines. (Such lines will be present only if you have not enabled a  header
                 syntax check in the appropriate ACL.)

                 The  -bnq  option  suppresses  all  qualification  of  unqualified  addresses in
                 messages that originate on the  local  host.  When  this  is  used,  unqualified
                 addresses  in  the  envelope  provoke  errors  (causing  message  rejection) and
                 unqualified addresses in header lines are left alone.

       -bP       If this option is given with no arguments, it causes the values  of  all  Exim's
                 main  configuration  options to be written to the standard output. The values of
                 one or more  specific  options  can  be  requested  by  giving  their  names  as
                 arguments, for example:

                   exim4 -bP qualify_domain hold_domains

                 However,  any  option  setting  that  is  preceded  by  the  word  "hide" in the
                 configuration file is not shown in full, except to  an  admin  user.  For  other
                 users, the output is as in this example:

                   mysql_servers = <value not displayable>

                 If  config  is given as an argument, the config is output, as it was parsed, any
                 include file resolved, any comment removed.

                 If config_file is given as an argument, the name of  the  runtime  configuration
                 file  is  output.  (configure_file works too, for backward compatibility.)  If a
                 list of configuration files was supplied, the value that is output here  is  the
                 name of the file that was actually used.

                 If  the -n flag is given, then for most modes of -bP operation the name will not
                 be output.

                 If log_file_path or pid_file_path are given, the names of the directories  where
                 log  files  and  daemon pid files are written are output, respectively. If these
                 values are unset, log  files  are  written  in  a  sub-directory  of  the  spool
                 directory  called  log,  and  the  pid  file  is written directly into the spool
                 directory.

                 If -bP is followed by a name preceded by +, for example,

                   exim4 -bP +local_domains

                 it searches for a matching named list of any type  (domain,  host,  address,  or
                 local part) and outputs what it finds.

                 If  one  of  the words router, transport, or authenticator is given, followed by
                 the name of an appropriate driver instance, the option settings for that  driver
                 are output. For example:

                   exim4 -bP transport local_delivery

                 The  generic  driver  options are output first, followed by the driver's private
                 options. A list of the names of drivers of a particular type can be obtained  by
                 using one of the words router_list, transport_list, or authenticator_list, and a
                 complete list of all drivers with their option settings can be obtained by using
                 routers, transports, or authenticators.

                 If  environment  is  given  as  an argument, the set of environment variables is
                 output, line by line. Using the -n flag suppresses the value of the variables.

                 If invoked by an admin user, then macro, macro_list and  macros  are  available,
                 similarly  to  the  drivers.   Because  macros  are  sometimes  used for storing
                 passwords, this option is restricted.  The output format is one item  per  line.
                 For  the "-bP macro <name>" form, if no such macro is found the exit status will
                 be nonzero.

       -bp       This option requests a listing of the contents of the mail queue on the standard
                 output.  If  the  -bp  option  is  followed by a list of message ids, just those
                 messages are listed. By default, this option can be used only by an admin  user.
                 However, the queue_list_requires_admin option can be set false to allow any user
                 to see the queue.

                 Each message in the queue is displayed as in the following example:

                   25m  2.9K 0t5C6f-0000c8-00 <alice@wonderland.fict.example>
                             red.king@looking-glass.fict.example
                             <other addresses>

                 The first line contains the length of time the message has been in the queue (in
                 this  case  25  minutes),  the  size  of  the  message  (2.9K), the unique local
                 identifier for the  message,  and  the  message  sender,  as  contained  in  the
                 envelope. For bounce messages, the sender address is empty, and appears as "<>".
                 If the message was submitted locally by  an  untrusted  user  who  overrode  the
                 default sender address, the user's login name is shown in parentheses before the
                 sender address.

                 If the message is frozen (attempts to deliver it are suspended)  then  the  text
                 "*** frozen ***" is displayed at the end of this line.

                 The  recipients  of  the  message (taken from the envelope, not the headers) are
                 displayed on subsequent lines. Those addresses to which the message has  already
                 been  delivered  are  marked  with  the  letter  D.  If an original address gets
                 expanded into several addresses via an alias or forward file,  the  original  is
                 displayed  with  a  D  only  when  deliveries for all of its child addresses are
                 complete.

       -bpa      This option operates like -bp, but in addition it shows delivered addresses that
                 were  generated from the original top level address(es) in each message by alias
                 or forwarding operations. These addresses are flagged with "+D" instead of  just
                 "D".

       -bpc      This  option counts the number of messages in the queue, and writes the total to
                 the   standard   output.   It   is   restricted   to   admin    users,    unless
                 queue_list_requires_admin is set false.

       -bpr      This  option  operates like -bp, but the output is not sorted into chronological
                 order of message arrival. This can speed it up when there are lots  of  messages
                 in  the  queue,  and  is  particularly  useful  if  the  output  is  going to be
                 post-processed in a way that doesn't need the sorting.

       -bpra     This option is a combination of -bpr and -bpa.

       -bpru     This option is a combination of -bpr and -bpu.

       -bpu      This option operates like -bp but shows only undelivered top-level addresses for
                 each  message  displayed.  Addresses generated by aliasing or forwarding are not
                 shown, unless the message was deferred after processing by  a  router  with  the
                 one_time option set.

       -brt      This  option  is for testing retry rules, and it must be followed by up to three
                 arguments. It causes Exim to look for a retry rule that matches the  values  and
                 to write it to the standard output. For example:

                   exim4 -brt bach.comp.mus.example
                   Retry rule: *.comp.mus.example  F,2h,15m; F,4d,30m;

                  The  first  argument,  which is required, can be a complete address in the form
                 local_part@domain, or it can be just a  domain  name.  If  the  second  argument
                 contains a dot, it is interpreted as an optional second domain name; if no retry
                 rule is found for the first argument, the second is tried.  This  ties  in  with
                 Exim's  behaviour  when looking for retry rules for remote hosts - if no rule is
                 found that matches the host,  one  that  matches  the  mail  domain  is  sought.
                 Finally,  an  argument that is the name of a specific delivery error, as used in
                 setting up retry rules, can be given. For example:

                   exim4 -brt haydn.comp.mus.example quota_3d
                   Retry rule: *@haydn.comp.mus.example quota_3d  F,1h,15m

       -brw      This option is for testing address rewriting rules, and it must be followed by a
                 single  argument,  consisting  of  either  a  local  part without a domain, or a
                 complete address with a fully qualified domain. Exim outputs  how  this  address
                 would be rewritten for each possible place it might appear.

       -bS       This  option  is  used for batched SMTP input, which is an alternative interface
                 for non-interactive local message  submission.  A  number  of  messages  can  be
                 submitted  in  a  single run. However, despite its name, this is not really SMTP
                 input. Exim reads each message's envelope from SMTP  commands  on  the  standard
                 input,   but   generates   no   responses.   If   the   caller  is  trusted,  or
                 untrusted_set_sender is set, the senders in the SMTP MAIL commands are believed;
                 otherwise the sender is always the caller of Exim.

                 The message itself is read from the standard input, in SMTP format (leading dots
                 doubled), terminated by a line  containing  just  a  single  dot.  An  error  is
                 provoked if the terminating dot is missing. A further message may then follow.

                 As  for  other  local  message  submissions, the contents of incoming batch SMTP
                 messages can be checked using  the  non-SMTP  ACL.   Unqualified  addresses  are
                 automatically   qualified   using   qualify_domain   and  qualify_recipient,  as
                 appropriate, unless the -bnq option is used.

                 Some other SMTP commands are recognized in the input. HELO and EHLO act as RSET;
                 VRFY,  EXPN,  ETRN,  and  HELP act as NOOP; QUIT quits, ignoring the rest of the
                 standard input.

                 If any error is encountered, reports are written  to  the  standard  output  and
                 error  streams,  and Exim gives up immediately. The return code is 0 if no error
                 was detected; it is 1 if one or more messages were accepted before the error was
                 detected; otherwise it is 2.

       -bs       This  option causes Exim to accept one or more messages by reading SMTP commands
                 on the standard input, and producing SMTP replies on the standard  output.  SMTP
                 policy  controls,  as  defined  in  ACLs are applied.  Some user agents use this
                 interface as a way of passing locally-generated messages to the MTA.

                 In this usage, if the caller of Exim is trusted, or untrusted_set_sender is set,
                 the  senders  of  messages are taken from the SMTP MAIL commands.  Otherwise the
                 content of these commands is ignored and the sender is set  up  as  the  calling
                 user. Unqualified addresses are automatically qualified using qualify_domain and
                 qualify_recipient, as appropriate, unless the -bnq option is used.

                 The -bs option is also used to run Exim from inetd, as an alternative to using a
                 listening  daemon.  Exim  can  distinguish the two cases by checking whether the
                 standard input is a TCP/IP socket. When Exim is called from inetd, the source of
                 the  mail is assumed to be remote, and the comments above concerning senders and
                 qualification do not apply. In this situation, Exim behaves in exactly the  same
                 way as it does when receiving a message via the listening daemon.

       -bt       This  option  runs Exim in address testing mode, in which each argument is taken
                 as a recipient address to be tested for deliverability. The results are  written
                 to the standard output. If a test fails, and the caller is not an admin user, no
                 details of the  failure  are  output,  because  these  might  contain  sensitive
                 information such as usernames and passwords for database lookups.

                 If  no arguments are given, Exim runs in an interactive manner, prompting with a
                 right angle bracket for addresses to be tested.

                 Unlike the -be test option, you cannot arrange for Exim to  use  the  readline()
                 function, because it is running as root and there are security issues.

                 Each  address  is  handled  as  if  it  were  the recipient address of a message
                 (compare the -bv option). It is passed to the routers and the result is  written
                 to  the  standard  output.  However,  any router that has no_address_test set is
                 bypassed. This can make -bt easier to use for  genuine  routing  tests  if  your
                 first router passes everything to a scanner program.

                 The  return  code  is  2  if  any address failed outright; it is 1 if no address
                 failed outright but at least one could not be resolved for some  reason.  Return
                 code 0 is given only when all addresses succeed.

                 Note:  When  actually  delivering  a  message,  Exim removes duplicate recipient
                 addresses after routing is complete, so that  only  one  delivery  takes  place.
                 This  does  not  happen  when  testing with -bt; the full results of routing are
                 always shown.

                 Warning: -bt can only do relatively simple testing. If any of the routers in the
                 configuration  makes  any  tests on the sender address of a message, you can use
                 the -f option to set an appropriate sender when running -bt tests.  Without  it,
                 the  sender  is assumed to be the calling user at the default qualifying domain.
                 However, if you have set up (for example) routers whose behaviour depends on the
                 contents of an incoming message, you cannot test those conditions using -bt. The
                 -N option provides a possible way of doing such tests.

       -bV       This option causes Exim to write the current version number, compilation number,
                 and  compilation date of the exim4 binary to the standard output.  It also lists
                 the DBM library that is being used,  the  optional  modules  (such  as  specific
                 lookup  types), the drivers that are included in the binary, and the name of the
                 runtime configuration file that is in use.

                 As part of its  operation,  -bV  causes  Exim  to  read  and  syntax  check  its
                 configuration file. However, this is a static check only. It cannot check values
                 that are to be expanded. For example, although a misspelt ACL verb is  detected,
                 an  error  in  the  verb's  arguments  is  not.  You cannot rely on -bV alone to
                 discover (for example) all  the  typos  in  the  configuration;  some  realistic
                 testing  is  needed.  The  -bh  and  -N  options  provide  more  dynamic testing
                 facilities.

       -bv       This option runs Exim in address verification mode, in which  each  argument  is
                 taken  as  a  recipient  address  to  be verified by the routers. (This does not
                 involve  any  verification  callouts).  During  normal  operation,  verification
                 happens  mostly as a consequence processing a verify condition in an ACL. If you
                 want to test an entire ACL, possibly including callouts, see the  -bh  and  -bhc
                 options.

                 If  verification  fails,  and the caller is not an admin user, no details of the
                 failure are output, because these might contain sensitive  information  such  as
                 usernames and passwords for database lookups.

                 If  no arguments are given, Exim runs in an interactive manner, prompting with a
                 right angle bracket for addresses to be verified.

                 Unlike the -be test option, you cannot arrange for Exim to  use  the  readline()
                 function, because it is running as exim4 and there are security issues.

                 Verification  differs from address testing (the -bt option) in that routers that
                 have no_verify set are skipped, and if the address is accepted by a router  that
                 has  fail_verify set, verification fails. The address is verified as a recipient
                 if -bv is used; to test verification for a sender address, -bvs should be used.

                 If the -v option is not set, the output consists  of  a  single  line  for  each
                 address,  stating  whether  it  was  verified or not, and giving a reason in the
                 latter case. Without -v, generating more than one address by redirection  causes
                 verification  to  end successfully, without considering the generated addresses.
                 However, if just  one  address  is  generated,  processing  continues,  and  the
                 generated  address  must  verify  successfully  for  the overall verification to
                 succeed.

                 When -v is set, more details are given of how the address has been handled,  and
                 in  the  case  of  address  redirection,  all  the  generated addresses are also
                 considered. Verification may succeed for some and fail for others.

                 The return code is 2 if any address failed outright;  it  is  1  if  no  address
                 failed  outright  but at least one could not be resolved for some reason. Return
                 code 0 is given only when all addresses succeed.

                 If any of the routers in the configuration makes any tests on the sender address
                 of  a  message,  you  should use the -f option to set an appropriate sender when
                 running -bv tests. Without it, the sender is assumed to be the calling  user  at
                 the default qualifying domain.

       -bvs      This  option  acts  like -bv, but verifies the address as a sender rather than a
                 recipient address. This affects  any  rewriting  and  qualification  that  might
                 happen.

       -bw       This option runs Exim as a daemon, awaiting incoming SMTP connections, similarly
                 to the -bd option.  All port specifications  on  the  command-line  and  in  the
                 configuration file are ignored.  Queue-running may not be specified.

                 In  this  mode,  Exim  expects  to  be  passed a socket as fd 0 (stdin) which is
                 listening for connections.  This permits the system to start up and  have  inetd
                 (or  equivalent) listen on the SMTP ports, starting an Exim daemon for each port
                 only when the first connection is received.

                 If the option is given as -bw<time> then the time is a timeout, after which  the
                 daemon will exit, which should cause inetd to listen once more.

       -C <filelist>
                 This  option  causes  Exim to find the runtime configuration file from the given
                 list instead of from the  list  specified  by  the  CONFIGURE_FILE  compile-time
                 setting. Usually, the list will consist of just a single filename, but it can be
                 a colon-separated list of names. In this case, the first  file  that  exists  is
                 used.  Failure  to  open an existing file stops Exim from proceeding any further
                 along the list, and an error is generated.

                 When this option is used by a caller other than root, and the list is  different
                 from  the  compiled-in  list,  Exim gives up its root privilege immediately, and
                 runs with the real and effective uid  and  gid  set  to  those  of  the  caller.
                 However,  if  a TRUSTED_CONFIG_LIST file is defined in Local/Makefile, that file
                 contains a list of full pathnames, one per line, for configuration  files  which
                 are trusted. Root privilege is retained for any configuration file so listed, as
                 long  as  the  caller  is  the  Exim  user  (or  the  user  specified   in   the
                 CONFIGURE_OWNER  option,  if  any), and as long as the configuration file is not
                 writeable by inappropriate users or groups.

                 Leaving  TRUSTED_CONFIG_LIST  unset  precludes  the  possibility  of  testing  a
                 configuration using -C right through message reception and delivery, even if the
                 caller is root. The reception works, but by that time, Exim is  running  as  the
                 Exim  user, so when it re-executes to regain privilege for the delivery, the use
                 of -C causes privilege to be lost. However, root can test reception and delivery
                 using  two separate commands (one to put a message in the queue, using -odq, and
                 another to do the delivery, using -M).

                 If ALT_CONFIG_PREFIX is defined in Local/Makefile, it specifies a prefix  string
                 with  which  any file named in a -C command line option must start. In addition,
                 the filename must not contain the sequence /../.  However, if the value  of  the
                 -C  option  is  identical to the value of CONFIGURE_FILE in Local/Makefile, Exim
                 ignores  -C  and  proceeds  as  usual.  There  is   no   default   setting   for
                 ALT_CONFIG_PREFIX; when it is unset, any filename can be used with -C.

                 ALT_CONFIG_PREFIX  can  be  used to confine alternative configuration files to a
                 directory to which only root has access. This prevents someone  who  has  broken
                 into  the  Exim  account  from  running  a  privileged  Exim  with  an arbitrary
                 configuration file.

                 The  -C  facility  is  useful  for  ensuring  that   configuration   files   are
                 syntactically correct, but cannot be used for test deliveries, unless the caller
                 is privileged, or unless it is an exotic configuration  that  does  not  require
                 privilege. No check is made on the owner or group of the files specified by this
                 option.

       -D<macro>=<value>
                 This option can be used to override macro definitions in the configuration file.
                 However,  like  -C,  if  it is used by an unprivileged caller, it causes Exim to
                 give up its root privilege.  If DISABLE_D_OPTION is defined  in  Local/Makefile,
                 the  use  of  -D  is  completely disabled, and its use causes an immediate error
                 exit.

                 If  WHITELIST_D_MACROS  is  defined  in  Local/Makefile  then  it  should  be  a
                 colon-separated  list  of  macros  which  are  considered  safe  and, if -D only
                 supplies macros from this list, and the values are acceptable,  then  Exim  will
                 not give up root privilege if the caller is root, the Exim run-time user, or the
                 CONFIGURE_OWNER, if set.  This is a transition mechanism and is expected  to  be
                 removed  in  the  future.   Acceptable values for the macros satisfy the regexp:
                 ^[A-Za-z0-9_/.-]*$

                 The entire option (including equals sign if present)  must  all  be  within  one
                 command  line  item.  -D  can  be  used to set the value of a macro to the empty
                 string, in which case the equals  sign  is  optional.  These  two  commands  are
                 synonymous:

                   exim4 -DABC  ...
                   exim4 -DABC= ...

                 To  include  spaces  in a macro definition item, quotes must be used. If you use
                 quotes, spaces are permitted around the macro name  and  the  equals  sign.  For
                 example:

                   exim4 '-D ABC = something' ...

                 -D  may be repeated up to 10 times on a command line.  Only macro names up to 22
                 letters long can be set.

       -d<debug options>
                 This option causes debugging information to be written  to  the  standard  error
                 stream.  It  is  restricted  to  admin  users  because debugging output may show
                 database queries that contain password information. Also, the details of  users'
                 filter  files  should  be protected. If a non-admin user uses -d, Exim writes an
                 error message to the standard error stream and  exits  with  a  non-zero  return
                 code.

                 When  -d  is  used,  -v is assumed. If -d is given on its own, a lot of standard
                 debugging data is output. This can be reduced, or increased to include some more
                 rarely  needed  information,  by  directly following -d with a string made up of
                 names preceded by plus  or  minus  characters.  These  add  or  remove  sets  of
                 debugging  data,  respectively.  For  example,  -d+filter adds filter debugging,
                 whereas -d-all+filter selects only filter debugging. Note  that  no  spaces  are
                 allowed in the debug setting. The available debugging categories are:
                     acl ACL interpretation
                     auth authenticators
                     deliver general delivery logic
                     dns DNS lookups (see also resolver)
                     dnsbl DNS black list (aka RBL) code
                     exec arguments for execv() calls
                     expand detailed debugging for string expansions
                     filter filter handling
                     hints_lookup hints data lookups
                     host_lookup all types of name-to-IP address handling
                     ident ident lookup
                     interface lists of local interfaces
                     lists matching things in lists
                     load system load checks
                     local_scan can be used by local_scan()
                     lookup general lookup code and all lookups
                     memory memory handling
                     noutf8 modifier: avoid UTF-8 line-drawing
                     pid modifier: add pid to debug output lines
                     process_info setting info for the process log
                     queue_run queue runs
                     receive general message reception logic
                     resolver turn on the DNS resolver's debugging output
                     retry retry handling
                     rewrite address rewriting"
                     route address routing
                     timestamp modifier: add timestamp to debug output lines
                     tls TLS logic
                     transport transports
                     uid changes of uid/gid and looking up uid/gid
                     verify address verification logic
                     all almost all of the above (see below), and also -v

                 The  all option excludes memory when used as +all, but includes it for -all. The
                 reason for this is  that  +all  is  something  that  people  tend  to  use  when
                 generating  debug  output for Exim maintainers. If +memory is included, an awful
                 lot of output that is very rarely of interest is generated, so it now has to  be
                 explicitly requested. However, -all does turn everything off.

                 The  resolver  option produces output only if the DNS resolver was compiled with
                 DEBUG  enabled.  This  is  not  the  case  in  some  operating  systems.   Also,
                 unfortunately,  debugging  output  from  the  DNS  resolver is written to stdout
                 rather than stderr.

                 The default (-d with no argument) omits expand, filter, interface, load, memory,
                 pid,  resolver,  and  timestamp.   However,  the  pid  selector  is  forced when
                 debugging is turned on for a daemon, which then passes it on to any  re-executed
                 Exims.  Exim  also automatically adds the pid to debug lines when several remote
                 deliveries are run in parallel.

                 The timestamp selector causes the current time to be inserted at  the  start  of
                 all  debug  output lines. This can be useful when trying to track down delays in
                 processing.

                 The noutf8 selector disables the use of UTF-8 line-drawing characters  to  group
                 related  information.  When disabled. ascii-art is used instead.  Using the +all
                 option does not set this modifier,

                 If the debug_print option is set in any driver, it produces output whenever  any
                 debugging is selected, or if -v is used.

       -dd<debug options>
                 This  option behaves exactly like -d except when used on a command that starts a
                 daemon process. In that case, debugging is turned off for the subprocesses  that
                 the  daemon  creates.  Thus,  it  is  useful for monitoring the behaviour of the
                 daemon without creating as much output as full debugging does.

       -dropcr   This is an obsolete option that is now a no-op. It used to affect the  way  Exim
                 handled CR and LF characters in incoming messages.

       -E        This  option  specifies that an incoming message is a locally-generated delivery
                 failure report. It is used internally by Exim when  handling  delivery  failures
                 and is not intended for external use. Its only effect is to stop Exim generating
                 certain messages to the postmaster, as otherwise message cascades could occur in
                 some  situations.  As  part  of  the  same  option,  a message id may follow the
                 characters -E. If it does, the log entry for the  receipt  of  the  new  message
                 contains the id, following "R=", as a cross-reference.

       -ex       There are a number of Sendmail options starting with -oe which seem to be called
                 by various programs without the leading  o  in  the  option.  For  example,  the
                 vacation program uses -eq. Exim treats all options of the form -ex as synonymous
                 with the corresponding -oex options.

       -F <string>
                 This option sets the sender's full name for use when a locally-generated message
                 is  being  accepted.  In the absence of this option, the user's gecos entry from
                 the password data is used. As users are generally permitted to alter their gecos
                 entries, no security considerations are involved. White space between -F and the
                 <string> is optional.

       -f <address>
                 This option sets the address of  the  envelope  sender  of  a  locally-generated
                 message (also known as the return path). The option can normally be used only by
                 a trusted user, but untrusted_set_sender can be set to allow untrusted users  to
                 use it.

                 Processes  running  as  root  or the Exim user are always trusted. Other trusted
                 users are defined by the trusted_users or trusted_groups options. In the absence
                 of  -f, or if the caller is not trusted, the sender of a local message is set to
                 the caller's login name at the default qualify domain.

                 There is one exception to the restriction on the use of -f: an empty sender  can
                 be  specified  by  any  user, trusted or not, to create a message that can never
                 provoke a bounce. An empty sender can be specified either as an empty string, or
                 as  a  pair of angle brackets with nothing between them, as in these examples of
                 shell commands:

                   exim4 -f '<>' user@domain
                   exim4 -f "" user@domain

                 In addition, the use of -f is not restricted when testing a filter file with -bf
                 or when testing or verifying addresses using the -bt or -bv options.

                 Allowing untrusted users to change the sender address does not of itself make it
                 possible to send anonymous mail. Exim still checks that the From: header  refers
                 to the local user, and if it does not, it adds a Sender: header, though this can
                 be overridden by setting no_local_from_check.

                 White space between -f and the <address> is optional (that is, they can be given
                 as  two  arguments  or one combined argument). The sender of a locally-generated
                 message can also be set (when permitted) by an  initial  "From  "  line  in  the
                 message  -  see  the  description  of  -bm above - but if -f is also present, it
                 overrides "From ".

       -G        This option is equivalent to an ACL applying:

                   control = suppress_local_fixups

                 for every message received.  Note that Sendmail will  complain  about  such  bad
                 formatting,  where  Exim  silently  just does not fix it up.  This may change in
                 future.

                 As this affects audit information, the caller must be a trusted user to use this
                 option.

       -h <number>
                 This  option is accepted for compatibility with Sendmail, but has no effect. (In
                 Sendmail it overrides the "hop count" obtained by counting Received: headers.)

       -i        This option, which has the same effect as -oi, specifies that a dot on a line by
                 itself  should  not terminate an incoming, non-SMTP message.  Solaris 2.4 (SunOS
                 5.4)     Sendmail     has     a      similar      -i      processing      option
                 https://docs.oracle.com/cd/E19457-01/801-6680-1M/801-6680-1M.pdf,   p.  1M-529),
                 and therefore a -oi command line option,  which  both  are  used  by  its  mailx
                 command.

       -L <tag>  This  option  is equivalent to setting syslog_processname in the config file and
                 setting log_file_path to syslog.  Its use is restricted to administrators.   The
                 configuration file has to be read and parsed, to determine access rights, before
                 this is set and takes effect, so early configuration file errors will not honour
                 this flag.

                 The tag should not be longer than 32 characters.

       -M <message id> <message id> ...
                 This  option requests Exim to run a delivery attempt on each message in turn. If
                 any of the messages  are  frozen,  they  are  automatically  thawed  before  the
                 delivery   attempt.  The  settings  of  queue_domains,  queue_smtp_domains,  and
                 hold_domains are ignored.

                 Retry hints for any of the addresses are overridden - Exim tries to deliver even
                 if  the  normal  retry  time  has not yet been reached. This option requires the
                 caller  to  be  an  admin   user.   However,   there   is   an   option   called
                 prod_requires_admin  which  can be set false to relax this restriction (and also
                 the same requirement for the -q, -R, and -S options).

                 The deliveries happen synchronously, that is, the original Exim process does not
                 terminate  until  all the delivery attempts have finished. No output is produced
                 unless there is a serious error. If you want to see what is happening,  use  the
                 -v option as well, or inspect Exim's main log.

       -Mar <message id> <address> <address> ...
                 This  option requests Exim to add the addresses to the list of recipients of the
                 message ("ar" for "add recipients"). The first argument must be  a  message  id,
                 and  the  remaining  ones  must  be  email addresses. However, if the message is
                 active (in the middle of a delivery attempt), it is not altered. This option can
                 be used only by an admin user.

       -MC <transport> <hostname> <host IP> <sequence number> <message id>
                 This  option  is not intended for use by external callers. It is used internally
                 by Exim to invoke another instance of itself to deliver a waiting message  using
                 an existing SMTP connection, which is passed as the standard input. This must be
                 the final option, and the caller must be root or the Exim user in order  to  use
                 it.

       -MCA      This  option  is not intended for use by external callers. It is used internally
                 by Exim in conjunction with the -MC option. It signifies that the connection  to
                 the remote host has been authenticated.

       -MCD      This  option  is not intended for use by external callers. It is used internally
                 by Exim in conjunction with the -MC option. It signifies that  the  remote  host
                 supports the ESMTP DSN extension.

       -MCd      This  option  is not intended for use by external callers. It is used internally
                 by Exim in conjunction with the -d option to pass on an  information  string  on
                 the purpose of the process.

       -MCG <queue name>
                 This  option  is not intended for use by external callers. It is used internally
                 by Exim in conjunction with the -MC option. It signifies that an alternate queue
                 is used, named by the following argument.

       -MCK      This  option  is not intended for use by external callers. It is used internally
                 by Exim in conjunction with the -MC option. It  signifies  that  a  remote  host
                 supports the ESMTP CHUNKING extension.

       -MCL      This  option  is not intended for use by external callers. It is used internally
                 by Exim in conjunction with the -MC option. It  signifies  that  the  server  to
                 which  Exim  is  connected  advertised limits on numbers of mails, recipients or
                 recipient domains.  The limits are given by the following three arguments.

       -MCP      This option is not intended for use by external callers. It is  used  internally
                 by  Exim  in  conjunction  with  the -MC option. It signifies that the server to
                 which Exim is connected supports pipelining.

       -MCp      This option is not intended for use by external callers. It is  used  internally
                 by Exim in conjunction with the -MC option. It signifies that the connection t a
                 remote server is via a SOCKS proxy, using  addresses  and  ports  given  by  the
                 following four arguments.

       -MCQ <process id> <pipe fd>
                 This  option  is not intended for use by external callers. It is used internally
                 by Exim in conjunction with the  -MC  option  when  the  original  delivery  was
                 started  by  a  queue  runner.  It passes on the process id of the queue runner,
                 together with the file descriptor number of an open pipe. Closure  of  the  pipe
                 signals  the  final  completion  of  the  sequence of processes that are passing
                 messages through the same SMTP connection.

       -MCq <recipient address> <size>
                 This option is not intended for use by external callers. It is  used  internally
                 by Exim to implement quota checking for local users.

       -MCS      This  option  is not intended for use by external callers. It is used internally
                 by Exim in conjunction with the -MC option, and passes  on  the  fact  that  the
                 ESMTP  SIZE  option  should  be  used  on  messages  delivered down the existing
                 connection.

       -MCT      This option is not intended for use by external callers. It is  used  internally
                 by Exim in conjunction with the -MC option, and passes on the fact that the host
                 to which Exim is connected supports TLS encryption.

       -MCr <SNI>
                 -MCs <SNI> These options are not intended for use by  external  callers.  It  is
                 used  internally  by Exim in conjunction with the -MCt option, and passes on the
                 fact that a TLS  Server  Name  Indication  was  sent  as  part  of  the  channel
                 establishment.   The argument gives the SNI string.  The "r" variant indicates a
                 DANE-verified connection.

       -MCt <IP address> <port> <cipher>
                 This option is not intended for use by external callers. It is  used  internally
                 by  Exim  in  conjunction  with  the -MC option, and passes on the fact that the
                 connection is being proxied by a parent process  for  handling  TLS  encryption.
                 The arguments give the local address and port being proxied, and the TLS cipher.

       -Mc <message id> <message id> ...
                 This  option  requests  Exim to run a delivery attempt on each message, in turn,
                 but unlike the -M option, it does check for retry hints, and respects  any  that
                 are  found.  This  option is not very useful to external callers. It is provided
                 mainly for internal use by Exim when it needs to re-invoke itself  in  order  to
                 regain  root privilege for a delivery.  However, -Mc can be useful when testing,
                 in order to run a delivery that respects retry times and other options  such  as
                 hold_domains that are overridden when -M is used. Such a delivery does not count
                 as a queue run.  If you want to run a specific delivery as if in  a  queue  run,
                 you  should  use  -q with a message id argument. A distinction between queue run
                 deliveries and other deliveries is made in one or two places.

       -Mes <message id> <address>
                 This option requests Exim to change the sender address in  the  message  to  the
                 given  address,  which must be a fully qualified address or "<>" ("es" for "edit
                 sender"). There must be exactly two arguments. The  first  argument  must  be  a
                 message  id,  and  the  second  one an email address. However, if the message is
                 active (in the middle of a delivery attempt), its status is not  altered.   This
                 option can be used only by an admin user.

       -Mf <message id> <message id> ...
                 This option requests Exim to mark each listed message as "frozen". This prevents
                 any delivery attempts  taking  place  until  the  message  is  "thawed",  either
                 manually  or as a result of the auto_thaw configuration option.  However, if any
                 of the messages are active (in the middle of a delivery attempt),  their  status
                 is not altered. This option can be used only by an admin user.

       -Mg <message id> <message id> ...
                 This  option  requests  Exim  to  give up trying to deliver the listed messages,
                 including any that are frozen. However, if any of the messages are active, their
                 status is not altered. For non-bounce messages, a delivery error message is sent
                 to the  sender,  containing  the  text  "cancelled  by  administrator".   Bounce
                 messages are just discarded. This option can be used only by an admin user.

       -MG <queue name> <message id> <message id> ...
                 This option requests that each listed message be moved from its current queue to
                 the given named queue.  The destination queue name argument is required, but can
                 be  an  empty  string  to  define  the  default  queue.  If the messages are not
                 currently located in the default queue, a -qG<name> option will be  required  to
                 define the source queue.

       -Mmad <message id> <message id> ...
                 This option requests Exim to mark all the recipient addresses in the messages as
                 already delivered ("mad" for "mark all delivered"). However, if any  message  is
                 active  (in  the  middle of a delivery attempt), its status is not altered. This
                 option can be used only by an admin user.

       -Mmd <message id> <address> <address> ...
                 This option requests Exim to mark the given addresses as already delivered ("md"
                 for  "mark  delivered").  The  first  argument  must  be  a  message id, and the
                 remaining ones must be email addresses. These are matched to recipient addresses
                 in  the  message  in  a  case-sensitive manner. If the message is active (in the
                 middle of a delivery attempt), its status is not altered.  This  option  can  be
                 used only by an admin user.

       -Mrm <message id> <message id> ...
                 This option requests Exim to remove the given messages from the queue. No bounce
                 messages are sent; each message is simply forgotten.  However,  if  any  of  the
                 messages  are  active, their status is not altered. This option can be used only
                 by an admin user or by the user who originally caused the message to  be  placed
                 in the queue.

       -Mset <message id>
                 This option is useful only in conjunction with -be (that is, when testing string
                 expansions). Exim loads the given message from its spool before doing  the  test
                 expansions,  thus  setting  message-specific variables such as $message_size and
                 the header variables. The $recipients variable is made available.  This  feature
                 is  provided  to  make  it  easier  to  test  expansions  that make use of these
                 variables. However, this option can be used only by  an  admin  user.  See  also
                 -bem.

       -Mt <message id> <message id> ...
                 This  option  requests  Exim  to  "thaw"  any  of  the  listed messages that are
                 "frozen", so that delivery attempts can resume. However, if any of the  messages
                 are  active,  their  status  is  not altered. This option can be used only by an
                 admin user.

       -Mvb <message id>
                 This option causes the contents of the  message  body  (-D)  spool  file  to  be
                 written to the standard output. This option can be used only by an admin user.

       -Mvc <message id>
                 This option causes a copy of the complete message (header lines plus body) to be
                 written to the standard output in RFC 2822 format. This option can be used  only
                 by an admin user.

       -Mvh <message id>
                 This  option  causes  the  contents of the message headers (-H) spool file to be
                 written to the standard output. This option can be used only by an admin user.

       -Mvl <message id>
                 This option causes the contents of the message log spool file to be  written  to
                 the standard output. This option can be used only by an admin user.

       -m        This    is    a    synonym    for    -om    that   is   accepted   by   Sendmail
                 (https://docs.oracle.com/cd/E19457-01/801-6680-1M/801-6680-1M.pdf p. 1M-258), so
                 Exim treats it that way too.

       -N        This  is a debugging option that inhibits delivery of a message at the transport
                 level. It implies -v. Exim goes through many of the motions  of  delivery  -  it
                 just  doesn't  actually  transport the message, but instead behaves as if it had
                 successfully done so. However, it  does  not  make  any  updates  to  the  retry
                 database,  and  the log entries for deliveries are flagged with "*>" rather than
                 "=>".

                 Because -N discards any message to which it applies, only root or the Exim  user
                 are  allowed  to use it with -bd, -q, -R or -M. In other words, an ordinary user
                 can use it only when supplying an incoming  message  to  which  it  will  apply.
                 Although  transportation  never fails when -N is set, an address may be deferred
                 because of a configuration problem on a transport, or a routing problem. Once -N
                 has  been  used for a delivery attempt, it sticks to the message, and applies to
                 any subsequent delivery attempts that may happen for that message.

       -n        This option is interpreted by Sendmail to mean "no aliasing".  For normal  modes
                 of operation, it is ignored by Exim.  When combined with -bP it makes the output
                 more terse (suppresses  option  names,  environment  values  and  config  pretty
                 printing).

       -O <data> This  option  is  interpreted  by  Sendmail to mean set option. It is ignored by
                 Exim.

       -oA <file name>
                 This option  is  used  by  Sendmail  in  conjunction  with  -bi  to  specify  an
                 alternative  alias  filename.  Exim handles -bi differently; see the description
                 above.

       -oB <n>   This is a debugging option which limits the maximum number of messages that  can
                 be  delivered  down  one  SMTP  connection, overriding the value set in any smtp
                 transport. If <n> is omitted, the limit is set to 1.

       -odb      This option applies to all  modes  in  which  Exim  accepts  incoming  messages,
                 including  the  listening  daemon.  It  requests  "background"  delivery of such
                 messages, which means that the accepting process automatically starts a delivery
                 process  for each message received, but does not wait for the delivery processes
                 to finish.

                 When all the messages have been received, the reception process  exits,  leaving
                 the  delivery  processes  to  finish  in their own time. The standard output and
                 error streams are closed at the start of each delivery  process.   This  is  the
                 default action if none of the -od options are present.

                 If  one  of  the  queueing  options  in  the  configuration  file (queue_only or
                 queue_only_file,  for  example)   is   in   effect,   -odb   overrides   it   if
                 queue_only_override   is   set   true,   which   is   the  default  setting.  If
                 queue_only_override is set false, -odb has no effect.

       -odf      This option requests "foreground" (synchronous) delivery when Exim has  accepted
                 a  locally-generated message. (For the daemon it is exactly the same as -odb.) A
                 delivery process is automatically started to deliver the message, and Exim waits
                 for it to complete before proceeding.

                 The  original  Exim reception process does not finish until the delivery process
                 for the final message has ended. The standard error stream is left  open  during
                 deliveries.

                 However,  like  -odb,  this option has no effect if queue_only_override is false
                 and one of the queueing options in the configuration file is in effect.

                 If there is a temporary delivery error during foreground delivery,  the  message
                 is  left  in  the  queue  for later delivery, and the original reception process
                 exits.

       -odi      This option is synonymous with -odf.  It  is  provided  for  compatibility  with
                 Sendmail.

       -odq      This  option  applies  to  all  modes  in  which Exim accepts incoming messages,
                 including the listening daemon. It specifies that the accepting  process  should
                 not  automatically  start a delivery process for each message received. Messages
                 are placed in the queue, and  remain  there  until  a  subsequent  queue  runner
                 process  encounters  them.  There  are  several  configuration  options (such as
                 queue_only)  that  can  be  used  to  queue  incoming  messages  under   certain
                 conditions.  This  option overrides all of them and also -odqs. It always forces
                 queueing.

       -odqs     This option is a hybrid between -odb/-odi and  -odq.   However,  like  -odb  and
                 -odi,  this  option has no effect if queue_only_override is false and one of the
                 queueing options in the configuration file is in effect.

                 When -odqs does operate,  a  delivery  process  is  started  for  each  incoming
                 message,  in  the  background  by default, but in the foreground if -odi is also
                 present. The recipient addresses are routed, and local deliveries  are  done  in
                 the  normal way. However, if any SMTP deliveries are required, they are not done
                 at this time, so the message remains in  the  queue  until  a  subsequent  queue
                 runner  process  encounters  it.  Because  routing  was  done,  Exim knows which
                 messages are waiting for which hosts, and so a number of messages for  the  same
                 host   can   be  sent  in  a  single  SMTP  connection.  The  queue_smtp_domains
                 configuration option has the same effect for specific domains. See also the  -qq
                 option.

       -oee      If an error is detected while a non-SMTP message is being received (for example,
                 a malformed address), the error is reported to the sender in a mail message.

                 Provided this error message is successfully sent,  the  Exim  receiving  process
                 exits with a return code of zero. If not, the return code is 2 if the problem is
                 that the original message has no recipients, or 1 for any other error.  This  is
                 the default -oex option if Exim is called as rmail.

       -oem      This  is  the same as -oee, except that Exim always exits with a non-zero return
                 code, whether or not the error message  was  successfully  sent.   This  is  the
                 default -oex option, unless Exim is called as rmail.

       -oep      If an error is detected while a non-SMTP message is being received, the error is
                 reported by writing a message to the standard error file (stderr).   The  return
                 code is 1 for all errors.

       -oeq      This  option  is  supported  for  compatibility  with Sendmail, but has the same
                 effect as -oep.

       -oew      This option is supported for compatibility  with  Sendmail,  but  has  the  same
                 effect as -oem.

       -oi       This  option, which has the same effect as -i, specifies that a dot on a line by
                 itself should not terminate an incoming, non-SMTP message. Otherwise,  a  single
                 dot  does terminate, though Exim does no special processing for other lines that
                 start with a dot. This option is set by default if Exim is called as rmail.  See
                 also -ti.

       -oitrue   This option is treated as synonymous with -oi.

       -oMa <host address>
                 A  number of options starting with -oM can be used to set values associated with
                 remote hosts on locally-submitted messages (that is, messages not received  over
                 TCP/IP).  These  options  can be used by any caller in conjunction with the -bh,
                 -be, -bf, -bF, -bt, or -bv testing options. In  other  circumstances,  they  are
                 ignored unless the caller is trusted.

                 The  -oMa option sets the sender host address. This may include a port number at
                 the end, after a full stop (period). For example:

                   exim4 -bs -oMa 10.9.8.7.1234

                 An alternative syntax is to enclose the IP address in square brackets,  followed
                 by a colon and the port number:

                   exim4 -bs -oMa [10.9.8.7]:1234

                 The  IP address is placed in the $sender_host_address variable, and the port, if
                 present, in $sender_host_port. If both -oMa and -bh are present on  the  command
                 line, the sender host IP address is taken from whichever one is last.

       -oMaa <name>
                 See  -oMa above for general remarks about the -oM options. The -oMaa option sets
                 the value of $sender_host_authenticated (the authenticator name).   This  option
                 can  be  used  with  -bh and -bs to set up an authenticated SMTP session without
                 actually using the SMTP AUTH command.

       -oMai <string>
                 See -oMa above for general remarks about the -oM options. The -oMai option  sets
                 the  value of $authenticated_id (the id that was authenticated).  This overrides
                 the default value (the caller's login id, except with -bh,  where  there  is  no
                 default) for messages from local sources.

       -oMas <address>
                 See  -oMa above for general remarks about the -oM options. The -oMas option sets
                 the authenticated sender value in $authenticated_sender. It overrides the sender
                 address  that  is  created  from  the  caller's login id for messages from local
                 sources, except when -bh is used, when there is no default.  For  both  -bh  and
                 -bs,  an authenticated sender that is specified on a MAIL command overrides this
                 value.

       -oMi <interface address>
                 See -oMa above for general remarks about the -oM options. The -oMi  option  sets
                 the  IP  interface  address value. A port number may be included, using the same
                 syntax as for -oMa. The interface address is placed in $received_ip_address  and
                 the port number, if present, in $received_port.

       -oMm <message reference>
                 See  -oMa  above for general remarks about the -oM options. The -oMm option sets
                 the message reference, e.g. message-id, and is logged during delivery.  This  is
                 useful  when  some kind of audit trail is required to tie messages together. The
                 format of the message reference is checked and  will  abort  if  the  format  is
                 invalid.  The  option  will only be accepted if exim is running in trusted mode,
                 not as any regular user.

                 The best example of a message reference is when Exim  sends  a  bounce  message.
                 The  message  reference is the message-id of the original message for which Exim
                 is sending the bounce.

       -oMr <protocol name>
                 See -oMa above for general remarks about the -oM options. The -oMr  option  sets
                 the  received  protocol  value that is stored in $received_protocol. However, it
                 does not apply (and is ignored) when -bh or -bs is used. For -bh,  the  protocol
                 is  forced  to one of the standard SMTP protocol names. For -bs, the protocol is
                 always "local-" followed by one of those same  names.  For  -bS  (batched  SMTP)
                 however,  the  protocol  can  be set by -oMr. Repeated use of this option is not
                 supported.

       -oMs <host name>
                 See -oMa above for general remarks about the -oM options. The -oMs  option  sets
                 the  sender  host  name  in $sender_host_name. When this option is present, Exim
                 does not attempt to look up a host name from an IP address; it uses the name  it
                 is given.

       -oMt <ident string>
                 See  -oMa  above for general remarks about the -oM options. The -oMt option sets
                 the sender ident value in $sender_ident. The default setting for  local  callers
                 is  the  login id of the calling process, except when -bh is used, when there is
                 no default.

       -om       In Sendmail, this option means "me too", indicating that the sender of a message
                 should  receive  a  copy  of  the  message  if  the  sender  appears in an alias
                 expansion. Exim always does this, so the option does nothing.

       -oo       This option is ignored. In Sendmail it specifies "old style  headers",  whatever
                 that means.

       -oP <path>
                 This  option is useful only in conjunction with -bd or -q with a time value. The
                 option specifies the file to which the process id of the daemon is written. When
                 -oX  is  used  with -bd, or when -q with a time is used without -bd, this is the
                 only way of causing Exim to write a pid file, because in those cases, the normal
                 pid file is not used.

       -oPX      This  option  is  not  intended  for  general  use.   The  daemon  uses  it when
                 terminating due to a SIGTEM, possibly in combination with -oP <path>.  It causes
                 the pid file to be removed.

       -or <time>
                 This  option  sets  a timeout value for incoming non-SMTP messages. If it is not
                 set, Exim will wait forever for the standard input. The value can also be set by
                 the receive_timeout option.

       -os <time>
                 This option sets a timeout value for incoming SMTP messages. The timeout applies
                 to each SMTP command and block of data.  The  value  can  also  be  set  by  the
                 smtp_receive_timeout option; it defaults to 5 minutes.

       -ov       This option has exactly the same effect as -v.

       -oX <number or string>
                 This  option  is  relevant  only when the -bd (start listening daemon) option is
                 also given. It controls which ports and interfaces the daemon uses. When -oX  is
                 used  to  start  a  daemon, no pid file is written unless -oP is also present to
                 specify a pid filename.

       -oY       This option controls the creation of an inter-process communications endpoint by
                 the  Exim  daemon.   It  is  only relevant when the -bd (start listening daemon)
                 option is also given.  Normally the daemon creates this socket, unless a -oX and
                 no -oP option is also present.  If this option is given then the socket will not
                 be created.  This could be required if the system is running multiple daemons.

                 The socket is currently used for

                 fast ramp-up of queue runner processes

                 obtaining a current queue size

       -pd       This option applies when an embedded Perl interpreter is linked  with  Exim.  It
                 overrides  the  setting of the perl_at_start option, forcing the starting of the
                 interpreter to be delayed until it is needed.

       -ps       This option applies when an embedded Perl interpreter is linked  with  Exim.  It
                 overrides  the  setting of the perl_at_start option, forcing the starting of the
                 interpreter to occur as soon as Exim is started.

       -p<rval>:<sval>
                 For compatibility with Sendmail, this option is equivalent to

                   -oMr <rval> -oMs <sval>

                 It sets the incoming protocol and host name (for trusted callers). The host name
                 and its colon can be omitted when only the protocol is to be set.  Note the Exim
                 already has two private options, -pd and -ps, that refer to embedded Perl. It is
                 therefore  impossible  to  set a protocol value of d or s using this option (but
                 that does not seem a real limitation).  Repeated  use  of  this  option  is  not
                 supported.

       -q        This  option  is  normally  restricted  to  admin  users.  However,  there  is a
                 configuration option called prod_requires_admin which can be set false to  relax
                 this restriction (and also the same requirement for the -M, -R, and -S options).

                 If  other commandline options do not specify an action, the -q option starts one
                 queue runner process. This scans the queue  of  waiting  messages,  and  runs  a
                 delivery  process  for  each  one in turn. It waits for each delivery process to
                 finish before starting the next one. A delivery process may not actually do  any
                 deliveries  if  the retry times for the addresses have not been reached. Use -qf
                 (see below) if you want to override this.

                 If the delivery process spawns other processes to deliver  other  messages  down
                 passed  SMTP  connections,  the  queue  runner  waits for these to finish before
                 proceeding.

                 When all the queued messages have been considered,  the  original  queue  runner
                 process terminates. In other words, a single pass is made over the waiting mail,
                 one message at a time. Use -q with a time (see below) if you  want  this  to  be
                 repeated periodically.

                 Exim  processes  the  waiting  messages in an unpredictable order. It isn't very
                 random, but it is likely to be different each time, which is all  that  matters.
                 If one particular message screws up a remote MTA, other messages to the same MTA
                 have a chance of getting through if they get tried first.

                 It is possible to cause the messages to  be  processed  in  lexical  message  id
                 order,  which  is  essentially  the  order in which they arrived, by setting the
                 queue_run_in_order option, but this is not recommended for normal use.

       -q<qflags>
                 The -q option may be followed by one  or  more  flag  letters  that  change  its
                 behaviour.  They  are  all  optional, but if more than one is present, they must
                 appear in the correct order. Each flag is described in a separate item below.

       -qq...    An option starting with -qq requests a two-stage queue run. In the first  stage,
                 the  queue  is scanned as if the queue_smtp_domains option matched every domain.
                 Addresses are routed, local deliveries happen, but no remote transports are run.

                 Performance will be best if the queue_run_in_order option is false.  If that  is
                 so  and  the  queue_fast_ramp option is true then in the first phase of the run,
                 once a threshold number of messages are routed for  a  given  host,  a  delivery
                 process is forked in parallel with the rest of the scan.

                 The  hints database that remembers which messages are waiting for specific hosts
                 is updated, as if delivery to those hosts  had  been  deferred.  After  this  is
                 complete,  a second, normal queue scan happens, with routing and delivery taking
                 place as normal. Messages that are routed to the  same  host  should  mostly  be
                 delivered  down  a  single SMTP connection because of the hints that were set up
                 during the first queue scan.  This option may  be  useful  for  hosts  that  are
                 connected to the Internet intermittently.

       -q[q]i... If  the  i  flag  is  present, the queue runner runs delivery processes only for
                 those messages that haven't  previously  been  tried.  (i  stands  for  "initial
                 delivery".)  This  can be helpful if you are putting messages in the queue using
                 -odq and want a queue runner just to process the new messages.

       -q[q][i]f...
                 If one f flag is present, a delivery  attempt  is  forced  for  each  non-frozen
                 message,  whereas  without  f  only  those non-frozen addresses that have passed
                 their retry times are tried.

       -q[q][i]ff...
                 If ff is present, a delivery attempt is forced for every message, whether frozen
                 or not.

       -q[q][i][f[f]]l
                 The  l  (the  letter  "ell") flag specifies that only local deliveries are to be
                 done. If a message requires any remote deliveries, it remains in the  queue  for
                 later delivery.

       -q[q][i][f[f]][l][G<name>[/<time>]]]
                 If the G flag and a name is present, the queue runner operates on the queue with
                 the given name rather than the default queue.  The name should not contain  a  /
                 character.   For a periodic queue run (see below) append to the name a slash and
                 a time value.

                 If other commandline options specify an action, a -qG<name> option will  specify
                 a queue to operate on.  For example:

                   exim4 -bp -qGquarantine
                   mailq -qGquarantine
                   exim4 -qGoffpeak -Rf @special.domain.example

       -q<qflags> <start id> <end id>
                 When  scanning  the  queue, Exim can be made to skip over messages whose ids are
                 lexically less than a given value by following the -q  option  with  a  starting
                 message id. For example:

                   exim4 -q 0t5C6f-0000c8-00

                 Messages  that  arrived  earlier  than  0t5C6f-0000c8-00 are not inspected. If a
                 second message id is given, messages whose ids are lexically greater than it are
                 also skipped. If the same id is given twice, for example,

                   exim4 -q 0t5C6f-0000c8-00 0t5C6f-0000c8-00

                 just  one delivery process is started, for that message. This differs from -M in
                 that retry data is respected, and it also differs from -Mc in that it counts  as
                 a  delivery  from a queue run. Note that the selection mechanism does not affect
                 the order in which the messages are  scanned.  There  are  also  other  ways  of
                 selecting specific sets of messages for delivery in a queue run - see -R and -S.

       -q<qflags><time>
                 When  a  time  value  is  present, the -q option causes Exim to run as a daemon,
                 starting a queue runner process at intervals specified by the given time  value.
                 This  form  of  the -q option is commonly combined with the -bd option, in which
                 case a single daemon process handles both functions. A common way of starting up
                 a combined daemon at system boot time is to use a command such as

                   /usr/sbin/exim4 -bd -q30m

                 Such  a  daemon  listens for incoming SMTP calls, and also starts a queue runner
                 process every 30 minutes.

                 When a daemon is started by -q with a time value, but without -bd, no  pid  file
                 is written unless one is explicitly requested by the -oP option.

       -qR<rsflags> <string>
                 This option is synonymous with -R. It is provided for Sendmail compatibility.

       -qS<rsflags> <string>
                 This option is synonymous with -S.

       -R<rsflags> <string>
                 The  <rsflags>  may be empty, in which case the white space before the string is
                 optional, unless the string is f, ff, r, rf, or  rff,  which  are  the  possible
                 values for <rsflags>. White space is required if <rsflags> is not empty.

                 This  option  is  similar  to  -q with no time value, that is, it causes Exim to
                 perform a single queue run, except that,  when  scanning  the  messages  on  the
                 queue,  Exim  processes  only those that have at least one undelivered recipient
                 address containing the given string, which is checked in a case-independent way.
                 If  the <rsflags> start with r, <string> is interpreted as a regular expression;
                 otherwise it is a literal string.

                 If you want to do periodic queue runs for messages with specific recipients, you
                 can combine -R with -q and a time value. For example:

                   exim4 -q25m -R @special.domain.example

                 This  example  does a queue run for messages with recipients in the given domain
                 every 25 minutes. Any additional flags that are specified with -q are applied to
                 each queue run.

                 Once a message is selected for delivery by this mechanism, all its addresses are
                 processed. For the first selected message, Exim overrides any retry  information
                 and  forces  a delivery attempt for each undelivered address. This means that if
                 delivery of any address in the first message is successful, any  existing  retry
                 information   is   deleted,  and  so  delivery  attempts  for  that  address  in
                 subsequently selected messages (which are processed without forcing)  will  run.
                 However,  if  delivery of any address does not succeed, the retry information is
                 updated, and in subsequently selected messages,  the  failing  address  will  be
                 skipped.

                 If  the  <rsflags> contain f or ff, the delivery forcing applies to all selected
                 messages, not just the first; frozen messages are included when ff is present.

                 The -R option makes it straightforward to initiate delivery of all messages to a
                 given  domain  after  a  host has been down for some time. When the SMTP command
                 ETRN is accepted by its ACL, its default effect is  to  run  Exim  with  the  -R
                 option, but it can be configured to run an arbitrary command instead.

       -r        This is a documented (for Sendmail) obsolete alternative name for -f.

       -S<rsflags> <string>
                 This option acts like -R except that it checks the string against each message's
                 sender instead of against the recipients. If -R is  also  set,  both  conditions
                 must  be  met for a message to be selected. If either of the options has f or ff
                 in its flags, the associated action is taken.

       -Tqt <times>
                 This is an option that is exclusively for use by the Exim testing suite.  It  is
                 not  recognized  when  Exim  is  run  normally.  It allows for the setting up of
                 explicit "queue times" so that various warning/retry features can be tested.

       -t        When Exim is receiving a locally-generated, non-SMTP  message  on  its  standard
                 input,  the  -t  option causes the recipients of the message to be obtained from
                 the To:, Cc:, and Bcc: header lines in the message instead of from  the  command
                 arguments.  The addresses are extracted before any rewriting takes place and the
                 Bcc: header line, if present, is then removed.

                 If the command has any arguments, they specify addresses to which the message is
                 not  to  be  delivered.  That  is,  the  argument addresses are removed from the
                 recipients list obtained from the headers. This is compatible with Smail  3  and
                 in  accordance with the documented behaviour of several versions of Sendmail, as
                 described in man pages on a number of operating systems (e.g.  Solaris  8,  IRIX
                 6.5,  HP-UX  11).  However,  some versions of Sendmail add argument addresses to
                 those obtained from the headers, and the O'Reilly  Sendmail  book  documents  it
                 that way. Exim can be made to add argument addresses instead of subtracting them
                 by setting the option extract_addresses_remove_arguments false.

                 If there are any Resent- header lines in the message, Exim  extracts  recipients
                 from  all  Resent-To:,  Resent-Cc:, and Resent-Bcc: header lines instead of from
                 To:, Cc:, and Bcc:. This is for compatibility  with  Sendmail  and  other  MTAs.
                 (Prior  to  release  4.20, Exim gave an error if -t was used in conjunction with
                 Resent- header lines.)

                 RFC 2822 talks about different sets of Resent- header lines (for when a  message
                 is  resent  several  times). The RFC also specifies that they should be added at
                 the front of the message, and separated by Received: lines. It  is  not  at  all
                 clear  how -t should operate in the present of multiple sets, nor indeed exactly
                 what constitutes a "set".  In practice, it seems that MUAs  do  not  follow  the
                 RFC.  The  Resent-  lines  are  often  added  at the end of the header, and if a
                 message is resent more than once, it is common for the original set  of  Resent-
                 headers  to  be  renamed  as X-Resent- when a new set is added. This removes any
                 possible ambiguity.

       -ti       This option is exactly equivalent to -t -i. It  is  provided  for  compatibility
                 with Sendmail.

       -tls-on-connect
                 This  option  is available when Exim is compiled with TLS support. It forces all
                 incoming SMTP connections to behave as if the incoming port  is  listed  in  the
                 tls_on_connect_ports option.

       -U        Sendmail   uses   this   option   for  "initial  message  submission",  and  its
                 documentation  states  that  in  future  releases,   it   may   complain   about
                 syntactically  invalid  messages  rather  than fixing them when this flag is not
                 set. Exim ignores this option.

       -v        This option causes Exim to write  information  to  the  standard  error  stream,
                 describing what it is doing. In particular, it shows the log lines for receiving
                 and delivering a message, and if an SMTP connection is made, the  SMTP  dialogue
                 is  shown. Some of the log lines shown may not actually be written to the log if
                 the setting of log_selector discards them. Any relevant selectors are shown with
                 each log line. If none are shown, the logging is unconditional.

       -x        AIX  uses -x for a private purpose ("mail from a local mail program has National
                 Language Support extended characters in the body of the mail item").  It sets -x
                 when calling the MTA from its mail command. Exim ignores this option.

       -X <logfile>
                 This  option is interpreted by Sendmail to cause debug information to be sent to
                 the named file.  It is ignored by Exim.

       -z <log-line>
                 This option writes its  argument  to  Exim's  logfile.   Use  is  restricted  to
                 administrators;  the  intent is for operational notes.  Quotes should be used to
                 maintain a multi-word item as a single argument, under most shells.

SEE ALSO

       exicyclog(8),    exigrep(8),    exim_checkaccess(8),    exim_convert4r4(8),    exim_db(8),
       exim_dbmbuild(8),   exim_lock(8),   eximon(8),   exinext(8),   exiqgrep(8),   exiqsumm(8),
       exiwhat(8),  update-exim4.conf(8),  update-exim4defaults(8),   /usr/share/doc/exim4-base/,
       /usr/share/doc/exim4-base/README.Debian.[gz|html].

       The full Exim specification, the Exim book, and the Exim wiki.

AUTHOR

       This  manual page was provided with the upstream Exim source package.  It was enhanced for
       the Debian GNU/Linux system.

                                                                                         EXIM4(8)